Questions tagged [english-to-latin-translation]

For questions about translating English words or phrases into Latin. Bulk translation requests are off-topic.

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Looking for an accurate translation of the English phrase "Comfort in Discomfort"

I've been trying to get a translation of the English phrase "Comfort in Discomfort" There are several translators out there and they seem to produce a wide variety of results. The full ...
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How do you say “remember what angers you” in Latin?

Was thinking this could be a sort of motto, similar to "memento mori". Perhaps it would fall along the lines of "memento [that which angers you]".
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Translate to Latin: Merciful Jesus, have pity on me

How would this be properly translated to Latin?
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Trying to write: I will fervorously and with great haste send our magnum opus for printing

I am trying to write a quite convoluted sentence in Latin (this is a quick attempt at some quick humor). However I am unsure of the correct placement of the different. Magno cum gaudio impressero ...
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4 votes
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to make a pass at/ hit on

Has anyone in their reading come across Latin words for to ‘hit on’ in the sense of speaking or behaving in a way that shows they want to have a sexual relationship with you. [informal] ‘She was ...
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3 votes
1 answer
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I'm looking for a stable English to Latin translation for the below quote

I did some research about the Greek Gods associated with language and communication and found that the best approximation is the Greek God: Hermes. I'm writing a research paper about communications, ...
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4 answers
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Is "Ave Dominus Nox" the correct translation for "Hail to the Lord of Night"?

In the Warhammer 40K universe, the Night Lords (scary stealthy dudes) use the battle cry "Ave Dominus Nox." This isn't meant to be in Latin, but in High Gothic, a made-up language for the ...
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5 votes
3 answers
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Lex "customer is always right" - how to say it in Latin (e.g. "in elit semper ius")?

I am analysing conflicting software requirements and I tried to apply lex specialis and lex posterior principles, but then I understood that the "the customer is always right" is the main ...
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1 answer
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Kyrie Eleison is Greek, but what is the proper Latin Translation?

As far as I know, these are the only Greek words in the Catholic Mass. What is their translation to Latin? I'm aware of this Wikipedia page, which discusses the history and the Greek. At the very ...
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How to say "oath-breaker" in Latin?

How can I translate "oath-breaker" properly into Latin in reference to losing one's faith?
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1 answer
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blizzard (snowstorm driven by strong, sustained winds)

This word first used, it seems, in 1859, is different from a snowstorm in that it indicates “ a strong, sustained storm of wind and cold, and dry, driving snow”. The only word I can find in Latin is ...
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How to say "engineering the future" in Latin to use as a motto?

I've checked with Google Translate, but fiddling around with words versus phrases is confusing me because it doesn't seem like this can just be a direct translation. Alternatively, how would you say &...
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How do I say "Brief Mass of the Butterfly" in Latin?

I am writing a mass setting that I would like to call the "Mass of the Butterfly". Since it doesn't include all of the ordinary, it's a missa brevis. I started with Google Translate, but it ...
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4 votes
2 answers
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Trying to translate: “Blessed be God who calls us His children.”

I’m trying to translate “Blessed be God who calls us His children.” Thank you so much for any help you might have.
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Been wanting to get a tattoo saying, forgive but never forget in Latin

so I'm currently looking for what's the best way to tattoo "forgive but never forget" but I know the direct translation in Google may not always be correct, hence I am seeking for help. The ...
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What are the Roles of "quo" and "eo" In "the more...the more" Constructions: For Example: "The more you have the meaner you become!"?

In his answer to Q: '...quo plus..., eo plus ... ' translation?, Joonas offered the example: "quo plus edo, eo laetior sum." = "The more I eat, the happier I am.", in ...
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Come to think of it/ now you mention it

These idiomatic phrases overlap. Both precede another comment about something just mentioned. An example of the first one is:- The meeting is next Tuesday, which, come to think of it, is also the date ...
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4 votes
1 answer
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doodle (verb & noun) scribble absent-mindedly/ a rough drawing made absent-mindedly

What might the Latin be for this word. I first thought that the Plautine has litteras gallina scripsit might be modified but eventually went for ‘inter otia aninmi formas scribere’ and ‘formae inter ...
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4 votes
1 answer
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What is the translation of "Actions speak louder than words" in Latin?

I would like to translate the sentence "Actions speak louder than words" into Latin. "Actiones seneca" was the translation that Google translate provided. Is that accurate?
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What Happened to Whitaker's Words?

Don't worry it still exists. My problem is that I like speaking Latin, and Whitaker's Words has been my go-to for English to Latin translation. In the last couple of months, they have removed their ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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Why is "expugno" in the Subjunctive in this Multi-Verb Indirect-Command?

In Titus Livy's "ab Urbe Condita" 26.1.2: "Q. Fululo Ap. Claudio, prioris anni consulibus, prorogatum imperium est atque exercitus quos habebant decreti, adiectumque ne a Capua quam ...
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4 votes
1 answer
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How do you say "The Etruscan language died as many years ago as there are stars in the sky and nobody understands it." in Latin?

What do you guys think, is "Abhinc tot annos, quot stellae in caelo sint, lingua Etrusca mortua est, nemoque eam comprehendit." be good Latin for that?
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have the last word/ be the last word (in fashion)

What suggestions would colleagues suggest for this English phrase? Example sentences are:- -Everyone started shouting, trying to have the last word, and the whole meeting just descended into chaos. -...
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5 votes
1 answer
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Translation Problems in Cicero's "ad Familiares 10.21.6"

While reading the Wiki entry on "opera", I found this example from Cicero's "ad Familiares 10.21.6": "ut exercitum locis habeam opportunis, provinciam tuear, etiam si ille ...
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1 answer
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How would you translate "The Adorned" for use as a collective title?

I took a few years of Latin back in high school, but my understanding of the language never really surpassed novice levels. I've been brainstorming names for a wolf pack in a story of mine; a lot of ...
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7 votes
1 answer
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How to say "See Naples and Die" in Latin?

I am not a student of Latin; I merely wish to give my short story a Latin title, namely the Latin translation of "See Naples and Die." The best I could find, not understanding Latin grammar, ...
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6 votes
1 answer
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to fiddle while Rome burns

I only want to find if there is an equivalent to the above phrase in Latin. I am aware of the history and origin of the phrase and what instrument Nero was playing and what he was doing at the time ...
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2 votes
1 answer
362 views

How would you say “night reader?”

As the title states, I’m curious how one would say “night reader.” As in, someone who enjoys reading late at night!
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4 votes
1 answer
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How does one translate "a fighting thing" and "a running away thing"?

In the same way "a thinking thing" is translated into Latin to res cogitans, how would you translate in Latin "a fighting thing" and "a running away thing"?
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7 votes
1 answer
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how best to express 'in case of...'

can 'in case of + noun' be translated as si + genitive, e.g. 'si ignis' (in case of fire)? or is a verbal clause (i.e. si forte + subjunctive) more idiomatic? thanks!
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What is the Literal Translation of "vestigio suo" in Suetonius' "Divus Augustus 28.2"?

In Suetonius' "Div. Aug. 28.2": "...et moriens ut feram mecum spem mansura in vestigio suo fundamenta rei publicae quae iecero." = "...and in dying I will carry the hope ...
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6 votes
3 answers
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What would this site be called in Latin?

Ignoring the technological shock that would likely happen from seeing a computer and the internet, what would Cicero or Caesar call the "Latin Language Stack Exchange" website? While I would ...
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3 votes
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Yes, sir, no siir, three bags full sir

Is there a Latin expression which is used by someone who sarcastically or semi-humorously pretends to be completely subservient and complies with everything that is asked of him (without even ...
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9 votes
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How to say "having the last laugh" in Latin

The expression "to have the last laugh" means to come out on top in a dispute or contest eventually, even if it may at first not seem so. This is particularly so if the person was laughed at ...
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3 votes
2 answers
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‘like hell!’ as a strong negative

I try to conduct all my conversations in Latin with my close friends and am trying to find a good Latin equivalent for ‘like hell!’ as a strong negative. Would minime gentium be a good response’ when ...
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6 votes
2 answers
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"Why this book should cost double in digital format" in Latin

I'm trying to translate: "Why the book should cost double in digital format"; this simple surprise/disappointment that a digital format costs more than paperback version. I came up with: ...
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5 votes
3 answers
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How would the Concept of "Schadenfreude" be Expressed in Latin?

While trying to find a Latin one-word equivalent of the German word, "schadenfreude" (= "A malicious enjoyment of others' misfortunes." [Gernan: "schade" = "harm&...
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3 votes
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bouncy castle (for children to jump and play on)

I have been asked by the child of a neighbour to translate this into Latin. I am finding it difficult apart from the fact that Latin doesn’t seem to have a good word for ‘bouncy’ apart from ‘salio’ ...
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4 votes
0 answers
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the best translation of ‘artificial intelligence’ in Latin

Is artificialis [artificiosa] intellegentia the best equivalent? Would the phrase have been understood by Cicero in the sense intended? Even intellegentia ficticia seems to me to be meaningless in ...
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1 vote
1 answer
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Please translate to Latin: “Power from truth”

I would like (if possible) a pithy version of the English phrase “Power from truth”. “From truth, power” is another way of formulating the thought I am trying to convey.
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1 answer
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Synchronization primitive in latin

I want to translate in to latin some of the names for the synchronization primitives I am programming. https://www.cs.columbia.edu/~hgs/os/sync.html Semaphore was quite easy, since it means a ...
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3 votes
0 answers
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Common latin phrase for "and the opposite case too"

I recall once seeing in some notes (not for Latin) which contained a Latin phrase - I can't recall the exact definition but contextually I knew it meant something along the lines of "and the ...
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7 votes
1 answer
108 views

Translate "Asking for a friend" into Latin

A modern antiphrasis in English is the phrase, "asking for a friend". It's normally used when a person wants to know something but humorously states that they're asking on behalf of someone ...
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5 votes
3 answers
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How "Park"/"square" (view image) is translated in Latin Language please?

Park, small street square, with some threes, banks and water in the middle. http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_CGOn7X3hBUU/TGbpp3dRQ5I/AAAAAAAABZk/AQ8F0yziEJg/w1200-h630-p-k-no-nu/100_5375.JPG http://www....
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5 votes
1 answer
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Translating 'supposedly' and the phrase 'supposed to'

These words seem very difficult to translate into idiomatic Latin. 'Supposedly' is used to express doubt that something is what people say it is, e.g. 'The queen supposedly finds Meghan Markle a ...
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5 votes
1 answer
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Translation of a exhortatory phrase of encouragement to remain cheerful in difficult circumstances

The trans phrase I am looking for a colloquial translation of is ‘keep your chin up!’I received a birthday card from an in-law with the phrase sursum mentum—-I have been waiting a long time for a knee ...
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1 vote
2 answers
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The Triumph of Hope over Experience

Oscar Wilde said that a second marriage is the triumph of hope over experience. The tricky part of translating this into Latin is the "over" part. This will, I think, have to be expressed in ...
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3 votes
2 answers
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Latin equivalent of ‘mind you! and ‘mind!’

I am looking for equivalent phrases or words for the above in Latin. Here are two specimen sentences in English. I realise that the force of each idiom is slightly different but in some respects also ...
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4 votes
0 answers
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What is the Latin for good/ bad vibes?

Clearly this word ‘vibes’ is colloquial, if not slang. My first attempts were to modify a phrase from Plautus for ‘good vibes’ viz. ab initio inter nos congrūimus concorditer and from Cicero for ‘bad ...
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6 votes
2 answers
872 views

How can I translate a slogan "pain is temporary, glory eternal!" to Latin correctly?

I'm trying to translate the following expression to Latin: "Pain is temporary, glory eternal!" So far I have: "Dolor est temporalis, gloria aeternus!" I have doubts about aeternus, ...
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