10

Using nimis (or related words) before an adjective strengthens it, but in a specific direction: nimis frigidus is "too cold", not "very cold". You can also reach a similar tone with comparative: frigidior can mean "too cold". I suggest three ways to emphasize an adjective: Superlative: Frigidissimus is a very idiomatic way to say "too cold". The absolute ...


8

I suggest that simple word order would also do the trick here: Marcus locutus est dux [or procurator or whatever].


7

Some variations in word arrangement are a matter of style and don't necessarily affect emphasis. Although textbooks may present some ideal arrangement of words and suggest that any deviation causes the words that are out of their 'proper' place to beome emphatic, the reality is much more nuanced. For example, although lata is separated from silva, the ...


6

Another option (in addition to the several excellent ones in answers so far) is to use (in) loco + gen., as in the phrase in loco parentis "as a parent, in the position of a parent". Lewis and Short (part IID of the entry) give a number of examples of this usage, such as: “in uxoris loco habere,” Ter. Heaut. 1, 1, 52: "to consider as a wife" “in liberum ...


6

I should like to extend @brianpck's answer by providing two further suggestions. 1. A neat way to express this is by using qua, as in these examples: — Ad hoc stipatum tribunal, atque etiam ex superiore basilicae parte qua feminae qua viri et audiendi — quod difficile — et — quod facile — visendi studio imminebant. [Pl. Sec. ep.6, 33] — nam gladiatoribus ...


6

A common and classically attested way of saying "to perform the role of X" is munere X fungi, where "X" is an adjective or genitive noun. Here is an example: fungar enim iam interpretis munere, ne quis me putet fingere. (Cicero, Tusculanae Disputationes, 3.41) I will now play the role of an interpreter, lest anyone accuse me of making things up. (...


3

I wonder whether we aren't all overthinking this, and the answers your teacher expects aren't "quis" and "Diana." The first word in the sentence in Latin is most frequently the one that receives emphasis, after all, and the fact that this would be an example of perfectly ordinary Latin word order doesn't mean there isn't emphasis in perfectly ordinary Latin ...


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