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16 votes
Accepted

Why is it "nomen mihi est" for "my name is", but it's "tibi nomen est" for "your name is"?

The Latin Duolingo course is not of particularly high quality. Completing the course will certainly give you some insight to Latin, but every detail of the course must be taken with a grain of salt. ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
16 votes
Accepted

Is Duolingo good for Latin?

I have used Duolingo for other languages, and I've now briefly tested it for Latin. There are two major issues: It goes way too fast. If the course has to be short for practical reasons, I would much ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
11 votes
Accepted

Cibus sanus — healthy food?

I think you are right that sanus more correctly describes a healthy state, whereas saluber/salubris seems to be preferred to describe those things which bestow health. Some examples: Climate: ex ...
Penelope's user avatar
  • 8,711
8 votes

Is Duolingo good for Latin?

Besides the issues found by Joonas, I'd add a few features not necessarily bad, but worth knowing in advance, for those willing to try the course: Pronunciation is consistently reconstructed. The ...
7 votes
Accepted

What is the difference between me and mihi?

I want to give a number of small answers, numbered for easy reference if they need discussion: Duolingo has tips that explains some of the grammar. They're worth checking out even if nothing puzzles ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes

Can "celare" take an accusative?

The constructional pattern at issue here (i.e. the verb celare plus a directional Prepositional Phrase (PP) with acc. case: e.g. Puella crustula sub stolam celat) does not sound quite natural since ...
Mitomino's user avatar
  • 8,911
5 votes

Is Duolingo good for Latin?

I have completed the entire Latin course. Along with Joonas's answer, I wanted to add that sometimes answers were straight up incorrect and misleading. I do not have any true gauge of my own Latin ...
NanoEta's user avatar
  • 1,411
5 votes

Is Duolingo good for Latin?

Duo keeps updating the Latin course. The company reviews comments and sends notifications that variations in certain answers have been accepted. I get one every couple of weeks. The Latin course was ...
Jay Brodell's user avatar
5 votes

Cibus sanus — healthy food?

I think the first problem here is that there are far more references to gourmandising in the classical sources than to the effects of food on health. Think, for example, of Horace Sat. II, iv passim, ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
  • 18.1k
5 votes
Accepted

“Itis” Versus “Is” in Latin

No, itis is the second person plural (present active indicative). Generally, -s is the regular active second person singular ending, and -tis the plural (except for the perfect tense). Mind you, ire ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
4 votes

Is Duolingo good for Latin?

I don’t like how the subjunctive and infinitives are handled. Psittacos tibi pulsare placet would be translated ‘you like striking the parrots’ instead of ‘it is pleasing to you to strike the parrots’
user15179's user avatar
4 votes

Cibus sanus — healthy food?

Just based on the meaning of the word, salutaris might be a better choice. I'm not sure if it was ever used that way but it seems to make more sense.
Adam's user avatar
  • 8,652
4 votes

Is the locative used with multi-part city names?

Two-word city names are sometimes put in the locative case Suessae Auruncae nuntiabant agnum cum duobus capitibus natum et Sinuessae porcum humano capite. (Livius, Ab Urbe Condita 32.9.3.2, via PHI ...
Asteroides's user avatar
  • 29.3k
1 vote

Is the locative used with multi-part city names?

I couldn't find any city names in specific, though this Wikipedia article on Rapidum mentions a road named Nova Praetentura that had the name in the first century C.E. Constantine also named ...
Adam's user avatar
  • 8,652

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