5

Let me try to approach this from a slightly different angle: What would work as a citation form? A good citation form would be such that you could deduce all other forms (from the present stem) from it. I will look into the six personal forms of present active indicative and the present active infinitive. The exercise can be extended to other forms, but ...


5

For practical reasons, I imagine the index form is often (but not always) given in the first-person since it comes first in the principal parts and is usually the first in a paradigm memorized. There is however ancient precedence. In discussing Latin verbs, Varro chiefly (but again not always) gives the first person unless he was specifically discussing ...


4

Collatinus-web will decline and conjugate any word for you with macrons and breves. Just enter a word in the second entry field and press Submit: But note that Collatinus will recognise inflected forms, so it may find several words for a form you entered. This is in fact the case for vates, where it also lists the alternative form vatis (nom. sing.) which ...


4

The basic problem is that in many instances the length of the vowels is not actually known, for example in words that do not occur in poetry, or vowels in closed syllables (hidden quantity). Your best bet is to use established print dictionaries like Lewis/Short, Gaffiot or Georges and avoid automated conjugation tables like Wiktionary or online-latin-...


4

This answer might not adhere exactly or fully to the question's demands, yet I believe it contains some valuable information. Here several sources to collect idiomatic expressions or collocation are presented. (*) The expressions in italics in this answer were confirmed (and several were discovered [previously unknown to me]), using the tool in point 2. 1. ...


4

I do not know a Latin–English dictionary that gives simple, accessible, clearly structured usage notes for verbs and simple, stripped-down examples. If such a dictionary exists, I would expect it to be found in the educational market, catering to students of Latin in secondary school. I know this is an English language website, and non-English dictionaries ...


4

This isn't a full answer, but brianpck provides some interesting evidence for how the Romans thought of verbs, in his answer to a related question. From Varro's De Lingua Latina VI.5.37: Primigenia dicuntur verba ut lego, scribo, sto, sedeo et cetera, quae non sunt ab ali<o> quo verbo, sed suas habent radices. Contra verba declinata sunt, quae ab ali&...


2

I agree with TKR's comment above that vaginae {is not/cannot be} marked with locative case. I share your view that, to the extent that this expression (condere vaginae gladium) is attested, vaginae is probably a dative. In fact, it is worth noting that some eminent philologists have claimed that in examples like the following one from Horace proprio horreo ...


2

I would recommend taking a look at Fax nova linguae latinae as I find it to meet the demand of simplicity and verb usage. Personally, I would have liked to discover this source earlier on my studies. On celo, for example, it readily presents the different ways of usage: Celare aliquem aliquid & de aliqua re, alicui aliquid. So we can see the double ...


1

I think for vocab you've already got the link provided in the comment section, but on a side note, verbix.com is very useful for verb conjugation, and quite accurate (in my experience!)


1

For Latin terms for concepts that the Ancients (and Medievals) had no notion of, the Vatican is always a good address. There is a lexicon recentis latinitatis issued by the Libraria Editoria Vaticana, although I'm not sure if it will have highly technical terms, for which you may very likely have to coin some of the words yourself. There is a small Italian–...


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