19

"Memento" means "remember". Literally it's "remember to die", which means: "Remember you must die." The Christian meaning is not just "remember you are a mere mortal", but especially "remember you will face Lord in the day of judgment". That's why this was the Cistercians' motto.


12

Note, in your Etymonline citation, that the word originally came into English with the meaning of "intercessory plea or prayer", rather than "vote"; that meaning wasn't established in English until the early 16th century. The Catholic prayer known as the Memorare contains suffragium as well: Memorare, O piissima Virgo Maria, non esse auditum a saeculo, ...


8

The normal word for "duty" in Latin isn't ius, but officium, and it's well attested for this meaning from Plautus to Suetonius (and later), in prose and poetry alike. Cicero's De Officiis is always translated as On Duties. Might be easier to just post the Lewis & Short definition in full: II. In gen., an obligatory service, an obligation, duty, ...


8

I don't know about that late a period, but the two dictionaries available on Perseus project give this as one definition for suffragium: B. In gen., a decision, judgment, opinion: “rhetor suffragio tuo et compotorum tuorum,” Cic. Phil. 2, 17, 42: “(apes) concorde suffragio deterrimos (reges) necant,” Plin. 11, 16, 16, § 51.— In partic., a favorable ...


6

As you noted (almost correctly), hibernum comes from hibernus, -a, -um which does mean 'wintry'. Any neuter adjective can be made into a noun by simple use. It's a feature of the language. However, hibernum is rare and not often used. 99% of the time when an author wants to say 'winter', they say hiems, if not perhaps some poetical euphemism. Hibernum's ...


6

As Aristotle is generally considered as the father of biology — Darwin wrote: “Linnaeus and Cuvier have been my two gods… but they were mere school-boys to old Aristotle.” (in a letter to W. Ogle, 1882) —, it is logical to search for such a definition in his works. According to Pierre Pellegrin (in particular in Une zoologie sans espèce, 1984), the ...


5

Criticism of Latin Translation First, a brief criticism of the Latin text that you are using as a source: Expressing purpose: The English of the song is a purpose clause, i.e. "in order to tell you..." Though later Latin can use an infinitive for this, it is more standard to use ut + subjunctive. See my answer to another question about purpose ...


4

"Memento Mori" means "Remember you will die", however, it comes from a Roman Imperial custom and, only much later, became a Christian motto with a different meaning and goal. In early Imperial Rome when an emperor or General, would return to Rome after a successful campaign (military or political) he would cruise the streets on a chariot surrounded with an ...


4

A great resource, if you can get a copy, for medieval Latin is J. F. Niermeyer's Mediae latinitatis lexicon minor (Leiden: Brill, 1976). There are other post-classical dictionaries, but this is a great single-volume supplement to Lewis & Short (the OLD is great, but mainly great for classicists / classical texts). Anyway, here's the entry for ...


4

It's not necessary to be too literal in translating something like this, and I can't see any objection to the poetic licence in your suggestion of 'reciting', which makes the English roll along nicely while avoiding repetition : in fact I rather like it. It isn't unusual to find idiomatic uses of dicere translated into English. A single word to cover all ...


2

In its original sense, capri-fīcus just means "wild fig-tree". Its fruits are harder to eat and less pleasant than the domesticated fig-tree (fīcus), but goats can eat them just fine, so the Romans named it the "goat-fig". However, one thing the caprifīcus was known for was its tenacity: it had a reputation for pushing its roots up ...


2

Latin had a word sex, but it didn't have the same meaning as in English. Instead, it's cognate with English "six", and means the same thing. English "sex" comes from Latin sexus, -ūs, which comes from a root sec- meaning "cut" (compare section, dissect, segment). The original meaning was "division", which shifted to "a way of dividing something in half", ...


2

Source: Memento Explained Memento mori translates to "remember you must die". It is a medieval Latin Christian theory that focuses reflections on death not as a morbid practice but as an inspiration to truly live. The philosophy intends its practitioners to live for a cause rather than in the pursuit of earthly goods as everything is temporary. It is also ...


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