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“In” with the ablative describes a location, time, or steady state, whereas with the accusative it describes a direction. So the ablative is the appropriate case here, as you want to describe a figurative position, or state. “In” never takes the dative (nor does any other preposition). The phrase you propose looks good to me. A precedent for it is found in ...


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Diēs was originally an irregular member of the fourth declension: in Old Latin the nom. was diūs. But the irregular acc. diēm tended to generate a new nominative by analogy, and the noun was pulled into the emerging fifth declension while keeping its gender. These 12 or so nouns don't represent any identifiable group of PIE nouns, but slowly became more ...


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