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Imperatives of derivatives of facere, dicere and ducere

To supplement Tom Cotton's answer— There's one other verb which similarly shortens its imperative: ferō, ferre, tulī, lātus, imperative fer, ferte. Compounds always use the shortened/apocopated form (...
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Why does the verb πολυπραγμονεῖν use the noun stem and not the verb stem? (Greek)

The verb doesn't actually mean simply 'to do many things' – though that idea could conceivably be rendered by πολυπράττειν, if such a verb existed (it isn't attested in LSJ), or by πολλὰ πράττειν. ...
cnread's user avatar
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Imperatives of derivatives of facere, dicere and ducere

Generally, verbs of mixed 3rd/4th conjugation and their compounds (inf. -ere, 1st. pres. sing. in -io) all follow the same pattern, which includes compounds of facio, but not facio itself — which ...
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3rd Principal Part of *refero*

As @cnread's comment indicates, the geminate t of rettuli is thought to be a remnant of Indo-European perfect reduplication. The Proto-Indo-European perfect tense was formed with reduplication of the ...
TKR's user avatar
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6 votes

Imperatives of derivatives of facere, dicere and ducere

I don't have enough reputation to add a comment, but I wanted to point out that at least tābefac is attested, in the Vulgate no less: da illis formidinem et tabefac audaciam virtutis eorum et ...
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Imperatives of derivatives of facere, dicere and ducere

As Weiss 2009/2011 mentions, word-final –e is “normally retained” (p. 147; emphasis mine – Alex B.). That being said, there are some few cases when word-final –e was lost (or apocopated). In your ...
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When/whether to use "ineō" instead of "eō"

All three are fine! While there might be a slight difference in nuance, I would say that you can freely use any of them that feels best in that situation. There just turns out to be many ways to ...
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Where does quire come from?

The etymology I've heard, though I can provide no sources on it, is that it started with the idiom neque it "he doesn't go yet" = "he cannot" (compare French ne pas "not a step" used to negate verbs). ...
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Can I use in and advenire together?

Yes, this is an attested usage. Lewis and Short should be your first place to check for such information. For advenio they specifically give the list of constructions "absol., with ad, in, or acc.", ...
TKR's user avatar
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What is the difference between emere and coemere?

Emere would indeed be possible, but the prefix co- adds a flavor which suits this situation well. It is not intensified, but rather toned. I might translate coemere as "to collect by buying" or "to ...
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What is the purpose of repeating prepositions?

All three versions (Július villam advenit, Július ad villam advenit, and Július ad villam venit) are grammatically correct. My sense is that the latter two are more frequently found than the first, ...
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3rd Principal Part of *refero*

The prefix re- also appears as red-, an older form which mostly disappeared along with other final -ds (personal med, preposition extrad, imperative estod, ablative marid...). You can see this d in ...
Draconis's user avatar
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Any relationship between the parts of speech of the word to which a prefix can apply and of the word from which a prefix is derived?

The set of forms in Latin that can be used both as prepositions and as prefixes to verbs is fairly fixed (including things like in, ad, dē, ex/ē, etc.). You can consider these prefixes to be what ...
Asteroides's user avatar
2 votes

3rd Principal Part of *refero*

A brief comment re: geminate vs. non-geminate perfect forms of refero.
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2 votes
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Why was 'imperō' prefixed with 'in-' and not 'ad-'?

There actually is an apparo (ad + paro). The prefix ad- was assimilated and the 'd' turned into a 'p'. The word apparo means to prepare or provide. As C.M. Weimer commented, in- has an accusative ...
ktm5124's user avatar
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Why was 'imperō' prefixed with 'in-' and not 'ad-'?

The cases are derived from the parts (and meaning) of the word, not vice versa. Furthermore "impero" can have accusative-like component as well, referring to what is being commanded, albeit this is ...
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