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Descriptive example of Cicero's style

The first example that comes to my mind is the beginning of the Second Catilinarian: Tandem aliquando, Quirites, L. Catilinam furentem audacia, scelus anhelantem, pestem patriae nefarie molientem, ...
TKR's user avatar
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20 votes
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Meaning of "S. P. D." in letters

SPD is likely an acronym for Salutem Plurimam Dicit. When used in the phrase [Person X] salutem plurimam dicit [Person Y] it literally becomes Person X sends many greetings to Person Y Person ...
HDE 226868's user avatar
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19 votes

Meaning of "S. P. D." in letters

I'll just expand slightly on @HDE226868's excellent and correct answer and say that the literal translation of salutem plurimam dicit is "says very much health." Another version you're likely to see ...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
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15 votes
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What is the meaning of this quote by Marcus Tullius Cicero?

The first part of your quotation is not from Cicero, but from the Apologeticus Adversos Gentes pro Christianis (3,2) by Tertullian (c. 155 – c. 240 AD): Laudant quae sciunt, vituperant quae ...
qwertxyz's user avatar
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14 votes
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Why is Cicero considered the best Latin prose author?

One of the best and earliest extant comments about Cicero's eloquence is found in Quintilian's Institutiones Oratoriae. Therein, he delivers a defense of the claim that Cicero bests any other Latin ...
cmw's user avatar
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13 votes
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Did Cicero say or write "dubitando ad veritatem pervenimus"?

No. However, it likely is a boiled-down version of Abelard's saying in the Sic et Non: Dubitando quippe ad inquisitionem venimus; inquirendo veritatem percipimus. "By doubting indeed we come to ...
cmw's user avatar
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11 votes
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Cicero sentence

Note the forms of the other verbs in this passage: Ex patriis ritibus optuma colunto. From the ancient rites, let the best be cultivated. This is a third-person imperative, something we don't have ...
Draconis's user avatar
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11 votes
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Are all of Cicero's writings considered models?

When stylists claim to use Cicero as a model, they are chiefly talking about his orations, and his orations are what he is originally known for. Long before he penned philosophy, he was lauded as an ...
cmw's user avatar
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10 votes

Descriptive example of Cicero's style

Hic enim dies vobis, patres conscripti, inluxit, haec potestas data est, ut, quantum virtutis, quantum constantiae, quantum gravitatis in huius ordinis consilio esset, populo Romano declarare possetis....
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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10 votes

At what level of Latin would I be able to understand the writings of Cicero without translating to English?

It is a little difficult to describe such a “point” – as you can imagine, there does not come a time when it suddenly clicks and you switch from translating to reading. It is a gradual process – it ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
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Domino notus erat: Agent ablative without a preposition?

Domino is dative, not ablative. English has the same idiom: 'known to the master.'
cnread's user avatar
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9 votes
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Why does Cicero in his In Verrem pretend he has not heard of Praxiteles before?

I think the meaning of the passage is a shade different from your translation. At this point, he is speaking of the sacrarium (private shrine) of Heius, in which four beautiful statues are located. ...
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9 votes
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Looking for the source of Cicero quote

Though the wording of the article is unclear, the reference to Sextus Empiricus is only to the question of how many schools the "Academy" has ramified into. This a direct (albeit somewhat ...
brianpck's user avatar
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8 votes
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Meaning of the first line of Cicero's De Oratore

I deal here with the first part of this long sentence, as I it seems there lies the crux of the question. The main structure of this sentence is this: mihi videntur illi fuisse perbeati. To me they ...
d_e's user avatar
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8 votes
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The Role of "quem" in a Translation of Cicero

Quem The quem is part of quem ad modum (= ad quem modum), which is a common fixed phrase mean "how". The rest of the sentence The first thing to notice is the parallelism between the two ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
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Why does Cicero change gear in this example from the Catiline Orations?

This interesting syntactic variatio you point out is probably related to the fact that the three infinitival constructions refer to three SPATIAL events WITNESSED by Cicero, who was also THERE. Note ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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7 votes

"gerund + genitive" vs "gerund+accusative" ("scribendo epistulas" vs "scribendo epistularum")

I would not read the genitive and the gerund together. I suggest this reordering and grouping to clarify: …(plus operae) poneremus (in agendo) quam (in scribendo)… ≈ …we would put more work into ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
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Quid est opus quod Cicerō in Dē senectūte § 75 prōfert?

In opere Cicerōnis Dē senectūte ipse dīxit: «quod scrīpsī in Orīginibus» You have to be careful here, as, yes, this is Cicero's De Senectute, but the speaker in the text is Cato the Elder. So it is ...
cmw's user avatar
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7 votes

What is the meaning of this quote by Marcus Tullius Cicero?

Laudant quae sciunt, vituperant quae ignorant "Those who know [something] praise [it], those who don't know [it] censure [it]". This is a quotation from Christian church father Tertullian's ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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Why did Cicero switch from "abs te" to "a te" in his later works?

It seems to be a case of simple regularization. As L&S point out, abs is rarely used before a word other than te; a Packard search yields only ten such cases vs. 277 of abs te (and two of the ten ...
TKR's user avatar
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7 votes
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On the syntax of 'Cogitate quantis laboribus fundatum imperium (...) una nox paene delerit' (Cic. Cat. 4, 19)

Summary: the reason why this sentence seems unusual after translation is only because of the limits of English syntax, not because anything odd in the Latin. A short form of expression combining two ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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7 votes

Quid est opus quod Cicerō in Dē senectūte § 75 prōfert?

Nota bene nomen istius operis re vera esse « Cato Maior de Senectute »! Nam etsi a Cicerone scriptum est, hic praeclarus scriptor Catonem Maiorem ipsum induxit disputantem, quia neminem existimabat de ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
7 votes

What does “fac posse” mean in Epistulae ad Atticum VII.22?

Facio can be used to introduce a hypothetical, as L&S shows: To make believe, to pretend: facio me alias res agere, Cic. Fam. 15, 18: cum verbis se locupletem faceret, id. Fl. 20: me unum ex iis ...
Kingshorsey's user avatar
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6 votes

Uter vs. Uterque

Indeed, uter is a question word "which [of two]". And uterque can be translated as "both [of two]", but it might be better to think of it as "each [of two]". The reason is that uterque, like "each", ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes
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Translation of de Natura Deorum, 53

Your translation is very close and only requires a few tweaks. For context, Cicero introduces this passage a little earlier: he is talking about the five stellae errantes ("wandering stars"), which ...
brianpck's user avatar
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6 votes

Cicero sentence

That translation is about right, although famulus usually means an enslaved domestic servant of some kind, not a priest. In the context of a temple, the famuli would be acolytes. cogito is the future ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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6 votes

Is there an "comprehensive" list of Tironian symbols?

The bottom of the Wikipedia article Tironian notes includes a link to Wilhelm Schmitz's edition of the Commentarii notarum tironianarum. I apologize if you've already seen it, but in case you have not,...
Asteroides's user avatar
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6 votes
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What is the role of "ipso" in this quote from Cicero?

A couple of miscellaneous points, some iterated from my comments: You used more words to ask your question than strictly logically necessary. Why did you do that? Cicero doesn't use the bare minimum ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes

Quid est opus quod Cicerō in Dē senectūte § 75 prōfert?

A note in my text of De Senectute (edited by Shuckburgh) says "for Cato's Origines see Introduction. Cicero quotes this sentence from the fourth book of the Origines again in Tusc. 1, 42, 101.&...
MPW's user avatar
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5 votes

"gerund + genitive" vs "gerund+accusative" ("scribendo epistulas" vs "scribendo epistularum")

As pointed out in the previous answers, it seems quite clear that plus...operae is an argument of the verb poneremus. I found that some philologists corrected the text as follows: in agendo plus quam ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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