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18

SPD is likely an acronym for Salutem Plurimam Dicit. When used in the phrase [Person X] salutem plurimam dicit [Person Y] it literally becomes Person X sends many greetings to Person Y Person X would be the sender/writer of the letter, and Person Y would be the recipient. For more on Latin letter-writing, see this page.


16

The first example that comes to my mind is the beginning of the Second Catilinarian: Tandem aliquando, Quirites, L. Catilinam furentem audacia, scelus anhelantem, pestem patriae nefarie molientem, vobis atque huic urbi ferrum flammamque minitantem, ex urbe vel eiecimus, vel emisimus, vel ipsum egredientem verbis prosecuti sumus. Abiit, excessit, evasit, ...


16

I'll just expand slightly on @HDE226868's excellent and correct answer and say that the literal translation of salutem plurimam dicit is "says very much health." Another version you're likely to see is SQPD, which stands for salutem quam plurimam dicit, or "says as much health as possible." Another set of abbreviations that crops up often is SVBEEV or ...


14

The first part of your quotation is not from Cicero, but from the Apologeticus Adversos Gentes pro Christianis (3,2) by Tertullian (c. 155 – c. 240 AD): Laudant quae sciunt, vituperant quae ignorant "They praise what they know, they blame what they are ignorant of" (transl. by T.H. Bindley). It refers to those who blindly blame the christians not even ...


13

No. However, it likely is a boiled-down version of Abelard's saying in the Sic et Non: Dubitando quippe ad inquisitionem venimus; inquirendo veritatem percipimus. "By doubting indeed we come to the inquiry; and by inquiring, we perceive the truth." As you'll note from the comments of the above link, you'll see a reference to Cicero Tusc. Disp. 1....


8

I deal here with the first part of this long sentence, as I it seems there lies the crux of the question. The main structure of this sentence is this: mihi videntur illi fuisse perbeati. To me they seem to have been happy illi perbeati is not in the accusative as this is the subject of the sentence; it is right that videri might take the "accusative + ...


7

Summary: the reason why this sentence seems unusual after translation is only because of the limits of English syntax, not because anything odd in the Latin. A short form of expression combining two really distinct indirect questions I do not understand why the commentator read the sentence that way. It is theoretically possible to read the first ...


7

Laudant quae sciunt, vituperant quae ignorant "Those who know [something] praise [it], those who don't know [it] censure [it]". This is a quotation from Christian church father Tertullian's Apologeticus adversus Gentes, not Cicero. Laudari a bonis et vituperari a malis unum atque idem est "Being praised by the good and being censured by the wicked is ...


7

Hic enim dies vobis, patres conscripti, inluxit, haec potestas data est, ut, quantum virtutis, quantum constantiae, quantum gravitatis in huius ordinis consilio esset, populo Romano declarare possetis. — Cicero Phil. V, 2 init. Your question sent me straight to the Philippics. Brutus, after reading this, commenting in this letter to Cicero, thought it ...


7

I think the meaning of the passage is a shade different from your translation. At this point, he is speaking of the sacrarium (private shrine) of Heius, in which four beautiful statues are located. In my reading, Cicero is not claiming that he learned the names of the artisans themselves for the first time while researching his case: he is claiming that he ...


7

I would not read the genitive and the gerund together. I suggest this reordering and grouping to clarify: …(plus operae) poneremus (in agendo) quam (in scribendo)… ≈ …we would put more work into doing than writing… I see operae as a genitive qualifying plus. You could conceivably read in scribendo epistularum as "in the writing of letters", ...


6

Quem The quem is part of quem ad modum (= ad quem modum), which is a common fixed phrase mean "how". The rest of the sentence The first thing to notice is the parallelism between the two halves of the second sentence: Si enim vere agere volueris, omnia tibi relinquo; sin dissimulare [volueris], tu quem ad modum his satis facias videris. The verb ...


6

It seems to be a case of simple regularization. As L&S point out, abs is rarely used before a word other than te; a Packard search yields only ten such cases vs. 277 of abs te (and two of the ten are tuo, tua). This is the kind of situation in which regularization tends to happen: the special rule "use the variant form abs instead of a if the following ...


6

Your translation is very close and only requires a few tweaks. For context, Cicero introduces this passage a little earlier: he is talking about the five stellae errantes ("wandering stars"), which he sees as a misnomer: Maxume vero sunt admirabiles motus earum quinque stellarum quae falso vocantur errantes; nihil enim errat quod in omni aeternitate ...


5

Indeed, uter is a question word "which [of two]". And uterque can be translated as "both [of two]", but it might be better to think of it as "each [of two]". The reason is that uterque, like "each", is singular. I think it is clearest to say that uterque is "each" and ambo is "both". The meanings overlap significantly, but there are two main differences: ...


5

As a supplement to the accepted answer, there is actually a passage in which Cicero expresses a contradictory opinion. The context is that Simonides, who was asked to explain "quale sit deus," said he would respond in one day. As each day ended, though, he would ask for another day, explaining, "Quanto diutius considero tanto mihi spes videtur ...


5

It's a way of intensifying the superlative: "of the very highest..." L&S, s.v. vel, II.B: " With superlatives, to denote the highest possible degree, the very; the utmost; the most...possible."


5

As pointed out in the previous answers, it seems quite clear that plus...operae is an argument of the verb poneremus. I found that some philologists corrected the text as follows: in agendo plus quam in scribendo operam poneremus (e.g. see here), which led me to misinterpret the syntax of this example (see the relevant comment by cnread, who alerted me of ...


4

First of all, to address the question as to whether Cicero himself divided his works into chapters and paragraphs, Lynn S. Fotheringham says the following: In the first century BC, although paragraphing and other ways of marking breaks in a text existed, Cicero expresses disapproval for such crutches to literacy (De or. 3.173; Or. 228); and most literary ...


4

No, this construction is impossible because it has nominal syntax (hoc domūs tēctum "this house roof") like the English gerund, while the Latin gerund has verbal syntax (not *in hōc scrībendō "in this writing") and governs the same case as the verb (not *epistolārum scrībere "to write of-letters"). With verbs that govern the ...


4

The verb perpeti means roughly "to endure patiently". With the object omnia this seems to become "to endure anything patiently". The Latin phrase is constructed with accusativus cum infinitivo, so a natural English translation would indeed be "patiently enduring any inconvenience". You seem to have read perpeti as the ablative of perpes. There does not seem ...


3

SPD can also represent Salutem Plurimam Dat which has the same meaning as those mentioned above.


3

I group the words in the Cicero passage this way: (in agendo plus quam in scribendo) (operae poneremus) This makes operae some sort of object of poneremus—I can't tell if it's dative or genitive. Some googling suggests that aliquid operae pono is an idiom for "I put effort into something." Loeb Classical Library gives this translation (by Walter ...


2

There is little to add to the wonderful answer by @Cerberus, but I though it might be useful to add another possible way of translating this sentence into English by rendering the occurrences of quantus as being akin to rhetorical questions by "such": Ponder, how one night nearly destroyed this empire founded by such efforts, our liberty ...


2

Basically, you are correct, inasmuch as uter does indeed mean 'which[of two]?', and uterque can be translated as 'both'. The former is interrogative, the second is distributive. Bear in mind that English has its own ways of expressing this kind of thing: for instance, 'did they both do it?' and 'did each of them do it?' and the replies 'yes, both did it' ...


2

I guess that Cic. de Finibus IV, xvii [48] may be near to what you are looking for: ea, quae secundum naturam sunt, petenda, sed ab iis et appetitio et actio commovetur, If that isn't the exact reference, then I'm afraid that to locate the exact sentence would need either luck, or some closer reading than I have time to give it.


2

In this context I see studium as endeavor, activity or interest. I understand in dissimili ratione perspicere as "to see in a different way". Therefore I offer these translations: Atque ut eius diversa studia in dissimili ratione perspicere possitis… And so that you could examine his diverse interests in a different way… And to offer you ...


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