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What is "old" in the age of a wine?

I have found three ways of referring to the age of wine, the first of which is the most common and simplest: An adjective such as anniculus, bimus etc. quadrimum Sabina, o Thaliarche, merum diota ...
Penelope's user avatar
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12 votes

Breakfast, lunch, dinner?

Classical Latin Roman Republic According to the Guide Romain Antique, by Jean Dautry, Georges Hacquard and Olivier Maisani, from the second century BC the Romans had 3 meals a day only one of which ...
Luc's user avatar
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11 votes
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What verb is wine made with?

Cato Maior devotes a large subsection of De Agri Cultura to wine. You can read the entire text here, and as can be expected, he sticks to very simple verbs: general: making: vinum Graecum sic facito ...
blagae's user avatar
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11 votes
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Is there oil without olives?

The current communis opinio is both Latin words oleum and oliva were borrowed from Greek, which, in its turn, are of Pre-Greek origin (e.g. Beekes 2009/2016, Ernout & Meillet 2001); cf. Miller ...
Alex B.'s user avatar
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11 votes
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Cibus sanus — healthy food?

I think you are right that sanus more correctly describes a healthy state, whereas saluber/salubris seems to be preferred to describe those things which bestow health. Some examples: Climate: ex ...
Penelope's user avatar
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10 votes

Breakfast, lunch, dinner?

Here's a summary of the article "Meals" written by Professor Gutsfeld (Université de Lorraine) for Der Neue Pauly - if you're serious about Latin or classical studies, you should already know what it ...
Alex B.'s user avatar
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9 votes
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What is "menu" in Latin?

I think that both index and tabula ciborum work as calques but I can’t find any evidence for either in classical sources. Indeed, I can’t find any information about whether there even were menus at ...
Penelope's user avatar
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8 votes

What is "old" in the age of a wine?

There is a direct quote for this situation in the Satyricon, where Petronius just uses annus in the genitive plural: Statim allatae sunt amphorae vitreae diligenter gypsatae, quarum in cervicibus ...
blagae's user avatar
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8 votes
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Preparing food "al dente"

Pliny NH XV has palati gratia. It's not exactly al dente, of course, but at least it indicates that taste was referred to the palate, rather than the teeth: oleum ipsum sale vindicatur a ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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7 votes
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What is a ball as in meat ball?

Why not globus or globulus? Each is a word that basically means a spherical mass. The former has a wide range of uses, and would be a reasonable choice, but for 'meat ball' I should prefer the ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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6 votes
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Meaning of "cepeo"

Here are two data points: There are no results on The Latin Library for cepeo. There are no results on The Perseus Project for cepeo.
James Kingsbery's user avatar
6 votes
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What exactly was a pastillus?

I can't actually find any reference to pastillus meaning a type of bread. The OLD defines it as a medical term meaning "a pastille (either swallowed or applied as a medicament)". I have done a ...
Penelope's user avatar
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5 votes
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Latin words for various types of diets (carnivore, vegetarian, vegan, etc.)?

Does Latin have words for the various types of diets, e.g., "vegetarian," "vegan," etc.? Not really. There is certainly plenty of discussion of diets in Latin literature, whether for health or ...
Penelope's user avatar
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5 votes
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Were mushrooms vegetables to Romans?

Apparently yes. Although I haven't found any explicitly Roman source, all evidence point to fungi being considered plants at their time, and into the XX century. This is what I have found so far: ...
Rafael's user avatar
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5 votes

What exactly was a pastillus?

What you remember from years ago is probably as good a description as you will find. Dictionaries usually agree that a pastillus was a small, round object baked from flour, which some describe as a "...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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5 votes
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What are oranges in Classical Latin?

According to Quicherat’s French-English dictionary, you can say malum aureum or aurantium for translating orange. An interesting discussion about the Citrus Aurantium can be found in this book (in ...
Luc's user avatar
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5 votes
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Crêpes and crêperies

Both my English-Latin Dictionaries suggest Laganum (plural Lagana). Smith: laganun ex ovo frictum [explic. pancake (made with egg) fried.] Ainsworth: laganum. Like "Crêpe" it is a borrowed ...
Hugh's user avatar
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5 votes
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Putting "spread" on a bread in Latin

Savoury spreads: An earlier question on pesto gave two invented answers. Another is Gentleman's Relish, an anchovy flavoured spread that used the mock Latin description 'Patum Peperium,' (also the ...
Hugh's user avatar
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5 votes
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What was the standard ancient term for a thermopolium?

pŏpīna is the one, borrowed from Oscan or Umbrian, and cognate with (native Latin) coquina. Indeed, a Packhum search gives no results for thermopolium and 54 results (59 matches) for popina - note ...
Vincenzo Oliva's user avatar
5 votes

Cibus sanus — healthy food?

I think the first problem here is that there are far more references to gourmandising in the classical sources than to the effects of food on health. Think, for example, of Horace Sat. II, iv passim, ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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4 votes

Crêpes and crêperies

My dictionary (which I did not have access to when asking the question) also suggests laganum, and that word seems indeed very suitable. I have therefore accepted Hugh's answer. One can indeed refer ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes

Greatly fruitful in Latin?

To add to the previous suggestions, the first word that came to my mind was almus, -a, -um, which Lewis and Short glosses as: nourishing, affording nourishment, cherishing (poet. epithet of Ceres, ...
brianpck's user avatar
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4 votes
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What is plant-based or vegetarian food?

I had thought that the adjective (h)olitorius, from the noun (h)olus, might work, since the meaning is 'of or concerned with vegetables.' But after looking at the attestations in the dictionaries and ...
cnread's user avatar
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4 votes
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A word for national and other cuisines

According to OLD, coquina means 'The art of cookery.' It's (ultimately) the origin of, e.g., Italian cucina, which means both 'kitchen' and 'cuisine.' Update: I also see that, for culina, which has '...
cnread's user avatar
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4 votes

Putting "spread" on a bread in Latin

A good verb for spreading seems to be pandere. From "spread" one can derive "spreadable", and such derivations are widely attested in classical Latin: facilis < facere fragilis < frangere ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes

Cibus sanus — healthy food?

Just based on the meaning of the word, salutaris might be a better choice. I'm not sure if it was ever used that way but it seems to make more sense.
Adam's user avatar
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3 votes

A word for national and other cuisines

Cuisine is just a fancy word for prepared food. Why not simply cibus Nepalanus?
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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3 votes
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How to translate "pesto"?

The word pistatio already exists; OLD defines it as 'the action of ramming down,' which sounds quite unappetizing. In the entry for pistare that is linked to in the question, the attestation provides ...
cnread's user avatar
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3 votes

What is "old" in the age of a wine?

I believe that there's no difference between specifying the ages of people, and those of anything else. The verb I would choose here is conficio: Hoc vinum est XL annos confectum.
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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