19 votes

Can one translate ἀθάνατος as 'living' rather than 'immortal'?

"Living" is an undertranslation of "ἀθάνατος." "Living" has a straightforward translation from "ζῆν" (to live): the participle "ζῶν"; "ἀθάνατος," however, means "not mortal," as opposed to "not dead....
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15 votes

"Deus tu conversus vivificabis nos..."

The other answers are good for explaining the grammar. However, I would add that an important part of translating any text is remembering the context in which the passage was written. (I realize that ...
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The Latin word “Have” rather than “Ave” as a translation of the Greek word Χαῖρε?

It's an alternate form of ave; the L&S entry gives a couple of examples. Presumably this form arose through hypercorrection: since h was generally not pronounced in popular speech, confusion ...
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What does this manuscript say?

This comes from the Book of Hours, and is the first part of the prayers at terce. Latin: Ad tertiam Deus in adiutorium meum intende. Domine ad adiuvandum me festina. Gloria P[atri, et Filio: ...
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Why is Jesus inflected in such a way?

'Why' isn't usually a good question for these types of things, because the answer is often "just because." The Greek isn't typical, but it does have a parallel with o-contracted words like νοῦς, ...
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"Deus tu conversus vivificabis nos..."

The Baronius press edition is going (rightly so, I think) for elegance of English rather than absolute correct correspondence to Latin grammar. Conversus is a little tricky here, because while it's ...
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Latin translation for the Serenity Prayer?

The Wiki translation is bad in several ways (the first line is missing the word "change"; the infinitives are not good Latin; the verbs in the relative clauses should be subjunctive; and the word ...
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Proper parsing of "Ite, missa est"

The phrase is confusing if one assumes that missa is a perfect passive participle, since it has no obvious antecedent. The ending dialogue of the (Pauline/Novus Ordo) mass goes, V: Benedicat vos ...
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Is this bible in Koine Greek?

Yes, it is Koine instead of modern Greek. You can tell by some of the additional marks around the letters: Koine Greek has breathing marks, while modern does not. Both rough and smooth breathing ...
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Is there any Latin in the Bible?

According to the study, "A Study of Latin Words in the Greek New Testament", by Esther Laverne Benjamin, there are about thirty Latin words transliterated into Greek in the New Testament. ...
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Understanding the grammar: «illis Evangelii nuntiandi praebens mandatum»

Christus Apostolos misit ... illis Evangelii nuntiandi praebens mandatum Praebens is a participle modifying Christus: "Christ sent the apostles ... giving...". All the other words you marked depend ...
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What is the meaning of "suffragio" at the time of Calvin?

Note, in your Etymonline citation, that the word originally came into English with the meaning of "intercessory plea or prayer", rather than "vote"; that meaning wasn't established in English until ...
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Saints: sanctus or divus?

Superb question! Divus is a term used to refer to Roman deities or highly esteemed individuals (e.g. emperors). L&S give some classic Latin quotes, and you can also see books about Divus ...
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12 votes

Meaning of "SEVERA INDEOVI VAS" from 3rd Century slab

This inscription does not use spacing to separate words. (Word division was often not marked consistently, or not marked at all in Roman inscriptions.) The second and third lines actually say "IN DEO ...
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Can one translate ἀθάνατος as 'living' rather than 'immortal'?

ἀθάνατος uses the privative ἀ- (from [ἀν-][2] = "not"). Adding the privative prefix to a noun makes a compound meaning "one who is without [noun]". Since θάνατος means death, ...
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  • 3,056
11 votes

What's the correct way to say, in Latin, "creation within God" & "creation through God"?

Here are the Vulgate versions of the two verses you mention: Colossians 1.16: quoniam in ipso condita sunt universa in cælis, et in terra, visibilia, et invisibilia, sive throni, sive ...
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Why is "repetunt" 3rd pl active in Luke 12:20 (Vulgate)?

I think it helps to look at two different commentaries on this verse. First we'll reproduce the Greek, and then the commentaries on the Greek. εἶπεν δὲ αὐτῷ ὁ θεός Ἄφρων, ταύτῃ τῇ νυκτὶ τὴν ψυχήν σου ...
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11 votes

The Latin word “Have” rather than “Ave” as a translation of the Greek word Χαῖρε?

There is a longstanding view that the interjection ave is not the imperative of the verb aveo “to long for”, but is a loan from Punic ḥawe (tentative vocalisation), the imperative of the Semitic verb ...
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"Esto mihi in rupem praesidii et in domum munitam..."

This is most certainly a Hebraism. Compare to 2 Sam 7:14: ego ero ei in patrem et ipse erit mihi in filium In the Hebrew, we have: אֲנִי֙ אֶהְיֶה־לּ֣וֹ לְאָ֔ב וְה֖וּא יִהְיֶה־לִּ֣י לְבֵ֑ן ...
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On the literal meaning of "in saecula saeculorum"

It is a Semitic idiom, as in “king of kings” or “vanities of vanities”. “X-singular of X-plural” means “X to the highest possible degree”. This particular expression (“eternity of eternities”), is ...
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Can one translate ἀθάνατος as 'living' rather than 'immortal'?

Short answer: no, athanatos means "immortal", not just "living". Longer answer: compare the English word "immortal". It comes from the Latin in- ("not") + mort- ("death"). So you could argue ...
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Translation: «impulsi sunt et ipsi Christi amore»

This is the big question! Genitives can be either subjective or objective, and sometimes it's impossible to know which one a genitive is. Subjective genitives are the subject of the genitive. If this ...
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Proper parsing of "Ite, missa est"

This comes from Dom Prosper Guéranger's Explanation of the Prayers and Ceremonies of Holy Mass: ITE MISSA EST. These words are usually translated thus: “Go, the Mass is said.” However, we ...
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John 3:16 In Latin

The verse John 3:16 makes use of two grammatical topics which are important in both Greek and Latin: a result clause and a purpose clause. According to this, the verse can be logically divided in two. ...
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Is this translation from Ancient Greek correct?

Your translation is close! Here is a letter for letter transcription of the image, except there is a line over "ΘΣ" in the second line: ΚΥΡΙΕ ΟΘΣΤΟΥΑΓΙȢ ΚΟΣΜΑϏΔΑΜΙΑΝΟὙ ...
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Christ or Messiah in Latin

I agree with C. M. Weimer's answer that no Latin translation of "Χριστός" was regularly used in a devotional context. Here is a more explicitly worded Christian source from Isidore of ...
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Dominus illuminatio mea

The verb est is omitted but implied. The motto is taken from the start of Psalm 27 (or 26): Dominus illuminatio mea et salus mea; quem timebo? Dominus protector vitae meae; a quo trepidabo? The Lord ...
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9 votes
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How "sōlā fidē" means what it is supposed to mean

The word solus is a little ambiguous. While it has been discussed before (here and here), the topic is certainly not exhausted. I can think of several translations of sola fide: By means of the ...
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9 votes
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Elevatis oculis?

The second person plural form is elevatĭs, "you lift". However, in the passage you quote it is elevatīs, which is a plural ablative of the perfect participle. It is in the same form as ...
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9 votes

Meaning of "SEVERA INDEOVI VAS" from 3rd Century slab

Sumelic is right. I just want to add a few things. First, the expression in Deo vivas and related (e.g. vivatis in Christo, "may you live in Christ") seem to be of common use among Christians of the ...
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