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13

The text says: Trinum deum et unum pronis men- tibus adoremus virginique matri gratulantibus animis iugiter iubilemus. Venite exultemus domino iubilemus de- o salutari nostro praeoccupemus faciem e- ius in confessione et in psalmis iubilemus ei. Quoniam deus magnus dominus et rex magnus super omnes deos quoniam I failed to find this ...


12

Lines 4 and following are Psalm 94. As to lines 1–3, I believe what we have is an example of an antiphon, where a bit of chant that is extraneous to a psalm precedes, follows, and sometimes (I believe) is also repeated between the verses of that psalm. Specifically, this should be an example of an invitatory, since it uses Psalm 94. The details from the ...


10

You are correct to say that this is not a 'literal' translation. Turba is a feminine singular noun, and exultet is rightly singular. I'm not sure coro is the right word, though. Interestingly, turba made it into Spanish, but apparently with a decidedly negative connotation. In Classical Latin, turba also meant "mob", but could be used more neutrally, such as ...


6

I'm an experienced chant singer, so I do have some first-hand knowledge about what might be going on here. 1) The clarity of words in chant is important. But the problem for listeners is that the resonance of the spaces in which chant is usually sung/recorded is so great as to obscure even well-enunciated consonants, especially when you have multiple ...


3

In addition to the above answers, the following may provide some further background to your text. Following the trail to Trinity College, Dublin, I found the text online. The caption reads (in part): "This manuscript was created for the Order of the Most Holy Saviour, also known as the Bridgettines, a monastic order of Augustinian nuns." It dates from the ...


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