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14 votes
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Deciphering Latin text in an illuminated musical manuscript

The text says: Trinum deum et unum pronis men- tibus adoremus virginique matri gratulantibus animis iugiter iubilemus. Venite exultemus domino iubilemus de- o salutari nostro praeoccupemus ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
13 votes

Deciphering Latin text in an illuminated musical manuscript

Lines 4 and following are Psalm 94. As to lines 1–3, I believe what we have is an example of an antiphon, where a bit of chant that is extraneous to a psalm precedes, follows, and sometimes (I believe)...
cnread's user avatar
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10 votes
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Is the Spanish translation of the "Exultet" chant literal?

You are correct to say that this is not a 'literal' translation. Turba is a feminine singular noun, and exultet is rightly singular. I'm not sure coro is the right word, though. Interestingly, turba ...
cmw's user avatar
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7 votes
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How to better distinguish words in Gregorian Chant?

I'm an experienced chant singer, so I do have some first-hand knowledge about what might be going on here. 1) The clarity of words in chant is important. But the problem for listeners is that the ...
Cassius12's user avatar
  • 278
4 votes

Deciphering Latin text in an illuminated musical manuscript

In addition to the above answers, the following may provide some further background to your text. Following the trail to Trinity College, Dublin, I found the text online. The caption reads (in part): ...
Penelope's user avatar
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4 votes
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How to say "all together" in Latin when inviting people to sing?

I do not know what is usually said, but in musical notation, the expressions are sometimes found: Omnes (example here) Chorus plenus Concentus plenus Chorus/concentus plenus means "the full ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
3 votes

What is the meaning of "salvus" in this sentence about music?

Ablative phrases with salvus are commonly used to mean "preserving, maintaining, without violating" (see L&S I.B): salvā fidē, cōnscientiā ("staying true to one's honour, ...
Unbrutal_Russian's user avatar
2 votes

How to say "all together" in Latin when inviting people to sing?

What about “toti”? The advantage is that in Italian (the Latin of classical music) you use “tutti” to mean “all together”, the opposite of “solo”.
fdb's user avatar
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