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6

The case here is ablative. The preposition “ex” preceding the word “machina” is one of the many common usages of the ablative case. This could be the ablative of place (from), or as you can in your English translation, ablative of means.


1

This means "Ours by the sea"* (or, if you want to supply a noun where Latin will let an adjective do the job of a noun "Our place by the sea"). Thus, nostrum is nominative and mare ablative. It would be a nice motto for a family with a sea-side home, or for a sea-side city. Alternative interpretations, with nostrum modifying mare, are ...


1

Another possible interpretation would be that pro (alternatively written proh) is an interjection of sorrow or desperation, meaning something like “alas,” “alack”. While often used with a nominative or vocative (pro dii immortales, pro sancte Juppiter etc), it is also found with the accusative: pro deorum hominumque fidem! (which makes sense because the ...


6

The entry for pro in Lewis & Short mentions at II that the preposition pro comes with the ablative but remarks that accusative is possible in late Latin. As you quote a coat of arms, influences of late Latin are certainly a possibility. I don't know what the relative frequency of the two cases with pro is in any given era — apart from the accusative ...


7

There is probably no fixed standard, and I am not sure there is any authority that might set one. I believe many Latin speakers do not leave out the anno. However, when Pope Benedict XVI announced his resignation in Latin, he did use this precise format (no mensis, no anno), and as luck would have it, he read it out loud. (There are better versions, but I ...


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Overview | ---------------|------------------|--------------------------| | Case ordering | Origin | Popular in | | ---------------|------------------|--------------------------| | N-G-D-Ac-V-Abl | Antiquity | USA, Italy, Greece, | | | | Germany, Sweden, Russia* | | ---------------|--------...


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