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6

The combination of the preposition in and a noun in the ablative is an example of a “prepositional phrase.” (The word in is just one of many prepositions, and the majority require that the noun is in the accusative, or “take the accusative,” as it is called. See an overview here.) The ablative has many other uses, and there is no place for “the one ablative” ...


4

Within a typical praedicate, you can move around adverbial phrases fairly freely. Only when they should be connected to a certain phrase, but seem unconnected or connected to another phrase based on their position, may issues arise. In your example, all positions are valid. There can be a pragmatic difference: because the most basic word order often has the ...


10

I understand the phrase producant aquae reptile animae viventis to mean something like "let the waters bring forth the creeping/crawling thing of living breath." In more idiomatic English, I would say: "Let the waters bring forth creeping life." The meaning of anima (genitive form: animae) varies between "breath," "breath ...


16

Jerome probably prefers to stick to the original Hebrew that uses the singulars both for "reptile"(*) and volatile which are grammatically adjectives but used here as substantives. Interestingly enough, in both cases L&S dictionary explicitly lists examples from the Vulgate of using those as substantive (1, 2) - so it appears to be late Latin ...


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