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15

Your match of mihi with "to" is correct, but that's the dative case, not the genitive. The genitive is mei. Neither case is appropriate here, though. Audio more or less contains the idea of "to" in itself—it means "hear" or "listen to". Thus Listen to me! becomes (Listen to) (me)! becomes Audi me! Another way of ...


7

There is probably no fixed standard, and I am not sure there is any authority that might set one. I believe many Latin speakers do not leave out the anno. However, when Pope Benedict XVI announced his resignation in Latin, he did use this precise format (no mensis, no anno), and as luck would have it, he read it out loud. (There are better versions, but I ...


7

Here is an example using all seven cases in a typical way: Marce, vir feminae panem e furno pistoris Romae dat. Marcus (voc.), the man (nom.) gives a bread (acc.) from the baker's (gen.) oven (abl.) to the woman (dat.) in Rome (loc.). Reason for each case: Marce, vocative: Marcus is being addressed ("Hey Marcus!"), and the vocative is used for ...


7

Typically, Latin dictionaries just lump these uses together, hence your confusion. O (oh) can used with a number of cases other than the vocative when there's no addressing a person. For instance, the OLD entry (s.v. o²) treats them separately (probably because the OLD lexicographers used relevant data from the TLL entry - see below on this). 2.1 with the ...


6

The entry for pro in Lewis & Short mentions at II that the preposition pro comes with the ablative but remarks that accusative is possible in late Latin. As you quote a coat of arms, influences of late Latin are certainly a possibility. I don't know what the relative frequency of the two cases with pro is in any given era — apart from the accusative ...


6

The case here is ablative. The preposition “ex” preceding the word “machina” is one of the many common usages of the ablative case. This could be the ablative of place (from), or as you can in your English translation, ablative of means.


6

Here is another set of examples aimed at the precious bonus points. Now the cases are in the order they are taught here (nom, acc, gen, dat, abl) so as to help memorization; feel free to permute to your local standards. The first example uses only first declension feminines. You can also switch to plural for those endings. Puella uvam amicae vicinae e ...


5

Overview | ---------------|------------------|--------------------------| | Case ordering | Origin | Popular in | | ---------------|------------------|--------------------------| | N-G-D-Ac-V-Abl | Antiquity | USA, Italy, Greece, | | | | Germany, Sweden, Russia* | | ---------------|--------...


4

The constructional pattern at issue here (i.e. the verb celare plus a directional Prepositional Phrase (PP) with acc. case: e.g. Puella crustula sub stolam celat) does not sound quite natural since the verb celare is not a motion verb. It seems more natural to use a directional verb here like abdere or abscondere: Puella crustula sub stolam abscondit. Cf. an ...


4

Here is an all-masculine attempt, one word per case, plus a verb: Vesperi, Attice, imperator populi iussu regi equum pollicebitur. In the evening, Atticus, the commander, on the people's order, will promise the king a horse. Explanation: Vesperi: Locative of vesper. Attice: Vocative of Atticus, the person to whom the narration is addressed. imperator: ...


3

As Cerberus points out, plus is an adjective and has therefore the gender and number and case of the main word. There is also the corresponding adverb plus, which could be seen as the neuter accusative of the adjective. The word magis is also an adverb, but not synonymous with plus. I assume your question concerns the adverbial usage, but do bear in mind ...


2

The usage of plus and other forms like plures, plura seems to be a little complicated and depend on the grammatical number. Plus can be used as a singular noun or an adverb The form plus looks like a singular neuter adjective in the nominative/accusative case. However, what I've read is that this word in the singular is only used as an adverb (the nominative/...


2

The adjective plus means "more". If you want to say more than, you can either use the (often elliptical) conjunction quam, or an ablative of comparison. [Ego] habeo plura capita quam homines [capita habent]. [Ego] habeo plura capita quam [ego habeo] caudas. After quam, you would use the same case as the first element of the comparison, so ego ...


2

I agree with TKR's comment above that vaginae {is not/cannot be} marked with locative case. I share your view that, to the extent that this expression (condere vaginae gladium) is attested, vaginae is probably a dative. In fact, it is worth noting that some eminent philologists have claimed that in examples like the following one from Horace proprio horreo ...


1

In my dictionary another translation of "celare" is "to conceal". If this form is connected to an accusative it means "to conceal from somebody". That is the only case (according to the dictionary (Stowasser 2014) that is possible in connection to an accusative, so I suppose "Puella crustula sub stolam celat" makes no ...


1

This means "Ours by the sea"* (or, if you want to supply a noun where Latin will let an adjective do the job of a noun "Our place by the sea"). Thus, nostrum is nominative and mare ablative. It would be a nice motto for a family with a sea-side home, or for a sea-side city. Alternative interpretations, with nostrum modifying mare, are ...


1

Another possible interpretation would be that pro (alternatively written proh) is an interjection of sorrow or desperation, meaning something like “alas,” “alack”. While often used with a nominative or vocative (pro dii immortales, pro sancte Juppiter etc), it is also found with the accusative: pro deorum hominumque fidem! (which makes sense because the ...


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