12

Note, in your Etymonline citation, that the word originally came into English with the meaning of "intercessory plea or prayer", rather than "vote"; that meaning wasn't established in English until the early 16th century. The Catholic prayer known as the Memorare contains suffragium as well: Memorare, O piissima Virgo Maria, non esse auditum a saeculo, ...


8

I don't know about that late a period, but the two dictionaries available on Perseus project give this as one definition for suffragium: B. In gen., a decision, judgment, opinion: “rhetor suffragio tuo et compotorum tuorum,” Cic. Phil. 2, 17, 42: “(apes) concorde suffragio deterrimos (reges) necant,” Plin. 11, 16, 16, § 51.— In partic., a favorable ...


4

A great resource, if you can get a copy, for medieval Latin is J. F. Niermeyer's Mediae latinitatis lexicon minor (Leiden: Brill, 1976). There are other post-classical dictionaries, but this is a great single-volume supplement to Lewis & Short (the OLD is great, but mainly great for classicists / classical texts). Anyway, here's the entry for ...


2

This is a partial answer, because I'm more familiar with Classical Latin than that of Calvin's time. But in classical times, mōtus was specifically "passion", in the sense of a strong and sudden emotion: love or hatred would qualify, but not contentedness. L&S suggest the translations "agitation" and "disturbance", among others, and it was particularly ...


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