Questions tagged [calendarium]

For questions about Roman calendars, as well as the Latin terms we use to express them.

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7
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1answer
101 views

Why do numbered months in the ancient Roman calendar have different suffixes?

Wikipedia and other sites detail the (possibly legendary) ancient Roman "Calendar of Romulus": I'm curious about the suffixes to the "numbered" months, the fifth through tenth. The names of the ...
4
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1answer
57 views

Written evidence of a ten-month calendar

There is speculation that prior to the republic Roman calendar there was an earlier calendar instated by Romulus and consisting of ten months. I do not want to discuss here whether Romulus existed and ...
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2answers
118 views

How did the Romans call the days of the week?

As a prequel to this other question, as suggested by Joonas Ilmavirta I would like to know how did the Romans call the days of the week (if they had names at all) in the different systems they had. ...
6
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3answers
704 views

What do “KAL.” and “A.S.” stand for in this inscription?

The inscription below has this line: MORTUO XV KAL. OCT. A.S. MDCCCLVII I'm not sure what KAL. nor A.S. stand for. The source of the image states that the person died the 17th of September. The ...
4
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1answer
189 views

Pronunciation of numbers with respect to years

I understand that when dates are written, the years are expressed in Roman numerals (e.g.: 2019 is written MMXIX), but it has been years since I heard the numbers actually pronounced. How were the ...
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2answers
2k views

Are the names of these months realistic?

I'm working on a calendar. To choose the name of the months I focused on Latin and in particular on a systematisation of the names finishing with 'ber'. I was wondering if my choices were correct and ...
7
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0answers
80 views

How did the Romans say what year it was?

It is well-known that the Romans referred to a particular year by reporting the names of the two consuls that had been elected to serve during that year. We have numerous inscriptions that confirm ...
8
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2answers
227 views

Is 'datus' used for a date in Latin?

In many languages the word for date (a specific day, such as January 2, 2019) seems to come from the Latin participle datus: we have the English "date", the Italian "data", the Swedish "datum", and ...
4
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0answers
191 views

Is there a typical Easter greeting in Latin?

The typical Easter greetings are different in different languages. In some languages it's "Happy Easter" or "Good Easter", while some say "Christ has risen". Any of these phrases could be translated ...
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4answers
280 views

Latin name of Good Friday

Judging by Vicipaedia (I know, I know), Good Friday is known as Dies Passionis Domini in Latin. This is a very direct name. In English it is Good Friday, in Nordic countries Long Friday and other ...
8
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3answers
731 views

What is an eve?

It is New Year's Eve today, and there are other eves throughout the year. What would be a good Latin translation for "eve"1? The English word appears to be etymologically related to "evening" and ...
8
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1answer
76 views

What was the first name of Christmas?

What was the first Latin word or expression used for Christmas, the Christian event in the honor of Jesus' birth? I know what to call Christmas in Latin, but it occurred to me that there is no ...
4
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1answer
80 views

Did the Romans have an expression for a national day?

Did the Romans have any kind of a national day, or did the Romans have a name for the national day of some other nation? Such days go by various names in different countries (e.g. independence day or ...
3
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0answers
369 views

What is Thanksgiving in Latin?

It is now Thanksgiving in the US. How can I translate the name of the event to Latin? The Vicipaedia page is marked dubious (and I am suspicious of the Latin Wikipedia in any case). It offers several ...
7
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2answers
91 views

How to distinguish Julian and Gregorian calendars in Latin?

In some contexts it is important to express whether a given date (for example October 25 and November 7 in 1917) is according to the Julian or the Gregorian calendar. Are there established Latin ...
5
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1answer
234 views

How would this date be translated into Latin?

I want to engrave my ring with my wedding date in Latin. The date is June 8th, 2010. Can you translate this for me?
7
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1answer
188 views

Did the Romans have a Valentine's day?

The ancient Romans had many festivals, but did any of them celebrate friendship or love? Wikipedia mentions similarity to Lupercalia, but I consider love to be very different from fertility. I'm ...
4
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1answer
1k views

What did the Romans call the New Year?

What word was used in the ancient Rome to describe the time — and festivities if any — when one year ends and another begins? The literal translation of "new year", annus novus, can be ...
7
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2answers
2k views

How did the Romans wish happy holidays?

The Roman year included many festive occasions. In today's world it is customary to wish merry Christmas, happy Easter, and other such things. Did the Romans do the same during their own festivals, ...
6
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2answers
451 views

What is father's day in Latin?

Today happens to be father's day in Finland, and I would like to know how to express that in Latin. My understanding is that ancient Romans did not have a father's day, so the question is about ...
9
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2answers
822 views

How do we know that Kalendae is the first day of a month?

I have been told that Kalendae is the first day of a month. However, the Latin dates — which was discussed in this other question — alone do not make this obvious. Dates are expressed by ...
6
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1answer
78 views

Year in dates near the end of a year

Using the traditional dates of the Roman calendar, December 31 and December 30 would be pridie Kalendas Ianuarias and ante diem tertium Kalendas Ianuarias. The day is expressed in relation to the ...
18
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2answers
8k views

How do you write dates in Latin?

I have read a little about the history of the Julian and Gregorian calendars. Julius Caesar introduced the twelve-month Julian calendar in 46 BC, and Pope Gregory XIII introduced the Gregorian ...