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What should the corona virus be called in Latin?

A Latin professor in a classical highschool in Italy adopted the translation virus coronarium that appeared on this article of Ephemeris, an online newspaper in Latin, published on February 22. The ...
Vincenzo Oliva's user avatar
13 votes
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Examples of species whose Latin and scientific names are different

Well, I don't know if it counts, but I think you should search among recent species re-classing. When Linnaeus wrote, Latin names were the logical option to choose a scientific name from. That is why ...
Rafael's user avatar
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12 votes
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What should an epidemic be called in Latin?

Indeed, pestilentia does seem to describe any contagious disease as well as actual plague, just like Italian pestilenza, Spanish pestilencia, and Old French pestilence. The Romans didn't think twice ...
Vincenzo Oliva's user avatar
11 votes
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What are the names of the fingers in classical Latin?

The following, taken from a transcription of Smith & Hall's 'Copious & Critical Latin-English Dictionary', should give you everything that you need: Finger (subs.)-, digitus (also thumb or ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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10 votes
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Latin suffixes in the noun "vertebra"?

There are two distinct words here: The noun vertebra. The adjective vertebralis, "related to vertebra". The adjective is derived from the noun, and both the noun and the adjective have ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
10 votes
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Beaver and Pollux?

The Online Etymological Dictionary states His [Castor's] name was given to secretions of the animal (Latin castoreum), used medicinally in ancient times. (Through this association his name replaced ...
HDE 226868's user avatar
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9 votes
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Classical words for spelt

I find Vicipædia fairly untrustworthy as a rule. Scandala does not occur in Lewis & Short; perhaps the author(s) of the Vicipædia article are thinking of secāle, which is used in Pliny of black ...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
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9 votes

What should the corona virus be called in Latin?

One option is to turn the determiner "corona" into an adjective. That would lead to something like virus coronatum, "a crowned virus". I think it makes sense to keep the word virus ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
8 votes

What should an epidemic be called in Latin?

I'd use either pestilentia, plaga or, as you said, an epidemia. I'd call a pandemic a pandemia, simply because it makes perfect sense and is clear.
Victor BC's user avatar
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7 votes
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What does the f. adjective "tulda" mean?

Bambusa tulda Roxb. synonym Dendrocalamus tulda (Roxb.) Voigt In the Monaco Nature Encyclopedia, Giuseppe Mazza writes: The name of the genus comes from the local Malay name “bambu”; the specific ...
Hugh's user avatar
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7 votes
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Is llama lama or glama?

To complement @brianpck answer: First, let's state right away the obvious: since all known species of llamas are endemic to South America, it is highly unlikely that there is a classical latin word ...
plannapus's user avatar
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6 votes

Is llama lama or glama?

As you mentioned in your question, Linné originally grouped the llama under the genus "Camelus", as you can see in Systema Naturae: Camelus ... Camelus dorso laevi, pectore gibboso  &...
brianpck's user avatar
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6 votes
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Did the Romans have a definition for a species of organism?

As Aristotle is generally considered as the father of biology — Darwin wrote: “Linnaeus and Cuvier have been my two gods… but they were mere school-boys to old Aristotle.” (in a letter to W. Ogle, ...
Luc's user avatar
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6 votes
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On Julius Caesar and salmon

The derivation from salire is probably a folk etymology, especially since it does not explain the second syllable of salmo. Walde, Latein. Etym. Wb., says that salmo, and also salar “trout”, are ...
fdb's user avatar
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5 votes
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How can I construct a correctly formed fictitious-species name

For the genus, you'd want it to end in -don, like the Iguanodon. Necro- though doesn't mean "deadly', but "dead." Were I a biologist having seen this, I'd think "dead-tooth bat" and presume it had a ...
cmw's user avatar
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5 votes
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Maple trees in Ancient Rome

The noun acer, aceris n. (with short a) “maple tree” is not the same word as the adjective ācer, ācris, ācre (with long ā) “sharp”, though it is possible that they share the same Indo-Euopean origin. ...
fdb's user avatar
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5 votes

How are multiple, hyphenated, or compound adjectives declined [in botanical latin]?

None of the forms you suggest would be correct, because they are all in violation of the International Code of Nomenclature for algae, fungi, and plants, Division II, Chapter VIII, Article 60.10, ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
5 votes

Is the inflection of the Latin words in today's science similar to that of classical Latin, or English?

Words used in a Latin context are inflected as Latin, and words used in an English context are inflected as English. While people might pluralize "nucleus" as "nuclei", nobody says ...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes

Description of Cicadas from 1866

As a forewarning, I'm not particularly familiar with 19th century Latin, and some features of this text seem very odd to me (such as everything being in the ablative). There were also a few words I ...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes

Description of Cicadas from 1866

Rees Cyclopedia 1819, and therefore superceded by your source, does not list Rustia in the five pages (11 columns) on Cicada. However it does list Rustica with this description by Fabricius, in the ...
Hugh's user avatar
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4 votes

What are the names of the fingers in classical Latin?

The above answer is wonderful, but as a supplement Pomponius Porphyrion (2nd c. AD, or later), a commentator on Horatius (Horace), takes occasion in the following line of the Satires, Nomentanus ad ...
brianpck's user avatar
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4 votes
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Were mushrooms vegetables to Romans?

Apparently yes. Although I haven't found any explicitly Roman source, all evidence point to fungi being considered plants at their time, and into the XX century. This is what I have found so far: ...
Rafael's user avatar
  • 11.5k
4 votes

Meaning of phellos in the epithet for Quercus phellos, the biological/scientific name for the willow oak?

That's perfectly understandable, as the word isn't Latin, but Greek. φελλός is the Greek for the 'cork oak', Quercus suber. Why this word was used in the binomial for a different species of oak, I can'...
TKR's user avatar
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4 votes

Maple trees in Ancient Rome

(I'm going to answer this question primarily from the point of view of the wood, not the actual trees, as that's more interesting to me.) I'm not aware of any systematic study done to identify the ...
Cairnarvon's user avatar
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4 votes
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What does the Latin name Vectaerovenator inopinatus of the new dinosaur mean?

It is enticing to relate Vect- to some form of veho. But I see a link with the Latin name for the Isle of Wight, Vectis, where the dinosaur was found. See also http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?...
JobRozemond's user avatar
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3 votes

What should the corona virus be called in Latin?

Here is yet another option: simply virus corona. This should be read like Oedipus rex — the second noun corona being a determiner for virus. You could also read it as "virus called corona". (...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes

A good book on Scientific Latin?

Here are two that I like: Oscar E. Nybakken, Greek and Latin in scientific terminology (Ames, Iowa: The Iowa State University Press) William T. Stearn, Botanical Latin: history, grammar, syntax, ...
cnread's user avatar
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3 votes

What should the corona virus be called in Latin?

Wikipedia uses virus biologicum for virus in the modern sense of the word. Maybe combine that with a suitable form of corona. Then you have a literal translation that is clear and can't be ...
d-b's user avatar
  • 283
3 votes

What should the corona virus be called in Latin?

What is actually wrong with "coronavirus"? It is a correctly formed Latin compound: invariable nominal stem plus inflected noun.
fdb's user avatar
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