Skip to main content
9 votes
Accepted

Irregular aorist imperative from ἔχω

There are a handful of verbs that take -ς in the 2sg. aorist imperative: the others are δίδωμι, τίθημι, ἵημι (δός, θές, ἕς). The origin of this -ς is a mystery.
TKR's user avatar
  • 31.5k
6 votes
Accepted

Different ways to accent active aorist infinitives ending in 'αι' (Greek)

Wiktionary is simply wrong if it says that κώλυσαι, σιώπησαι are infinitives: they can only be aorist middle imperatives. The aorist active infinitives are κωλῦσαι, σιωπῆσαι. See this helpful handout ...
TKR's user avatar
  • 31.5k
5 votes
Accepted

Subjunctive αἰδέσεται rather than αἰδέσηται?

This is a relic of an older set of rules for forming the subjunctive. In Proto-Indo-European, the subjunctive was formed by adding *-e/o- to the verb stem. In thematic forms, which already end in *-e/...
TKR's user avatar
  • 31.5k
5 votes
Accepted

Is there an aoristic-perfective distinction in the Latin perfect?

There is, in fact! As you mention, the Latin "perfect tense" is a combination of the present perfective and past aoristic tense-aspect combinations, which remained separate in Greek (the &...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 68.3k
5 votes
Accepted

What are the θη-future and θη-aorist?

These terms are presumably intended to refer either to all aorist passives and future passives, or possibly to just the ones with a theta, a.k.a. "first aorist passives" and "first future passives". ...
TKR's user avatar
  • 31.5k
4 votes
Accepted

Subjunctive Protasis and Aorist Indicative Apodosis

It's still a present general conditional. You might have noticed in some grammars that they will say for the present general apodosis, it takes the "present indicative or an equivalent." The ...
cmw's user avatar
  • 56.3k
4 votes
Accepted

A question about accentuation for aorist infinitives

The rule of thumb for the accentuation of infinitives is the following: infinitives in -σθαι are accented recessively (e.g. λείπεσθαι), except in the thematic aorist (λιπέσθαι) and the perfect (...
Cairnarvon's user avatar
  • 10.7k
4 votes

What are the θη-future and θη-aorist?

Yes, that is correct. The only tenses/stems that can get θη are the aorist passive and the future passive: the others have passive meaning expressed by the middle voice (this being Greek, there will ...
Cerberus's user avatar
  • 20.1k
3 votes
Accepted

Should the phrase "I often saw" use the imperfect or the aorist in Greek?

This is an interesting question. A priori, one would think the imperfect would be the obvious choice here, as it's the tense generally used to denote repeated action, but actual Greek usage doesn't ...
TKR's user avatar
  • 31.5k
3 votes
Accepted

What's going on with ablaut in forms like ἔβην, βῆναι, φανῆναι?

Both of these go back to Proto-Greek palatal nasals. There are two reconstructed roots behind βαίνω: some forms come from *gʷem-, while others come from *gʷeh₂-. These two roots look extremely similar ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 68.3k
2 votes

What is the semantic difference between the present and aorist forms of the Greek imperative?

Having given this topic further thought, I think I can explain all the imperatives I have encountered to my satisfaction and so want to give an answer that might help others and is what I would have ...
Vegawatcher's user avatar
  • 2,710

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible