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14 votes
Accepted

Capital and non-capital letters in the Greek alphabet

It depends how hard they are to write with a pen! The "capital" letters are based on ancient inscriptional forms, the way they were carved into monuments. This is why they're made of ...
Draconis's user avatar
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13 votes
Accepted

Why is this Etruscan letter sometimes transliterated as "ch"?

Most of our understanding of Etruscan pronunciation comes from our knowledge of Greek. Back before the Greek alphabet was standardized, there were different varieties used in different areas. And ...
Draconis's user avatar
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10 votes

Why aren't there more letters representing consonant digraphs in Greek?

The question really isn't so much why there weren't more signs representing consonant clusters as it is why the ones that do exist are there. The Phoenician alphabet, from which the Greek derives, had ...
Cairnarvon's user avatar
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7 votes

Have these Greek letters been related to these Latin/English letters?

F and Φ: No. F descends from Greek digamma, a letter that originally represented /w/, which died out in the Greek alphabet shortly after /w/ did. You can still see relics of it in the number system. H ...
Draconis's user avatar
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5 votes

Hypothesis for Umbrian letter ers pronunciation

According to Rex Wallace, writing a chapter on the Sabellian languages for the Cambridge Encyclopedia of the World's Ancient Languages, "[d]elta was used for a voiced fricative /ẓ/ (ř) rather ...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes

Hypothesis for Umbrian letter ers pronunciation

I see no strong reason to reconstruct ř as a voiceless alveolar trill. Diachronically, it developed from voiced sounds: reconstructed *-VdV- and *-VlV[+front]- sequences are continued as (⟨ř⟩ and) ⟨...
Asteroides's user avatar
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4 votes

How shall I remember the order between the letters in Greek alphabet?

As far as most students are concerned, the order is arbitrary. There are historical reasons for it, relating to its Phoenician origins—the Phoenician abjad starts with aleph, beth, gimel, daleth, and ...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes
Accepted

Using "u" to transliterate Greek "υ" (upsilon) into English

I think you can choose whichever convention you like without it making much difference. The use of u is at any rate not completely restricted to British writers; nor, I believe, universal among them. ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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1 vote

How shall I remember the order between the letters in Greek alphabet?

The Greek alphabet is also a decimal number system made up of ordinal and cardinal numbers. Beginning with the Babylonians and the Egyptian astronomer-priests, 24 characters were needed to enumerate ...
Roland F's user avatar
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