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10 votes
Accepted

Domino notus erat: Agent ablative without a preposition?

Domino is dative, not ablative. English has the same idiom: 'known to the master.'
cnread's user avatar
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9 votes
Accepted

Is there a diminutive form for agent nouns?

There are agent nouns for all genders. For example, saltare gives rise to saltator, saltatrix, and saltatrum. For more details, see this question. The stem is revealed by the genitive form. For my ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
9 votes

Is there a diminutive form for agent nouns?

The example that I'm familiar with is meretricula, found in, e.g., Plautus, Rudens 62-63: ipse hinc ilico conscendit navem, avehit meretriculas.
cnread's user avatar
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7 votes
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How do I create an agent noun from volo?

Additionally, you can just use the present participle: volans, volantis. Both Lucretius and Vergil use volantes to mean "birds." From L&S: P. a. as subst.: vŏlantes , ĭum, comm., the ...
cmw's user avatar
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6 votes

Is there a diminutive form for agent nouns?

Are there any existing diminutives of agent (-tor/-trix) nouns? Yes, though the rarest. Examples for -trix have been already mentioned by @Joonas and @cnread: nutricula, meretricula... I'd like to ...
Shootforthemoon's user avatar
6 votes

How do I create an agent noun from volo?

It's not a standard agent noun formation, but there is in fact a word for "flier" or "flying one" derived from volāre: volucer -cris -cre. It was used both as an adjective and as a ...
Draconis's user avatar
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6 votes

Which agents are human?

I think there is a semantic difference between "a Gnaeo" for the agent and "sica" for the instrument. The agent will be expressed in this way only in a passive sentence, but the ablative of instrument ...
fdb's user avatar
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5 votes
Accepted

Which agents are human?

Ovid's Remédia Amórés 422 suggests that your grammar is mistaken and that non-humans with agency can be considered agents: Á cane nón mágnó sæpe tenétur aper. Cicero's Dé Officiís 1.68 suggests ...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
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4 votes

Hidden from/by you

If you used cēlō, you could render a phrase like tē mē cēlō I hide myself from you. Playing with the order can change emphasis and make it more or less ambiguous, but in theory, it doesn't make sense ...
Colin's user avatar
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4 votes

Domino notus erat: Agent ablative without a preposition?

A very similar question was raised and answered in this forum. As you can see, some people will tell you that domino is a "dative of agent" (see Section 375 of Allen & Greenough: "...
Mitomino's user avatar
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3 votes

Domino notus erat: Agent ablative without a preposition?

According to the Diccionari bàsic llatí–català edited by Enciclopèdia Catalana, notus can work as an adjective which, used with genitive or infinitive, means known to or famous to. So, as pointed out ...
Charo's user avatar
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3 votes
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Preposition of agent

It depends. I can see three somewhat different meanings here, and they all lead to different choices. If you want to say "he is carried in a litter", then the litter just describes location ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
2 votes

Can the ablative take a non-human agent or a human instrument?

Not only can animals and non-humans personified act as agent, but humans can act as instruments, as we see in Livy III.37: Et decemvirí, quí prímó tribuniciós hominés, quia id populáre habebátur, ...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
  • 16.6k

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