10

Actually, your quote from the Vulgate isn't an example of audire + dative! Though auditis is spelled the same as the present 2nd person plural ("You [pl.] hear"), it is actually an ablative perfect participle. A clue to this is that there would be an unexplained shift from tu to vos. In your sentence, auditis sermonibus is an ablative absolute forming a ...


8

Your analysis is correct: this is fīlia "daughter" + -ne "?". The trick is, -ne can attach to any word, not just verbs. In fact, it usually attaches to either the first word, or the most emphatic word, whatever that might be. Since nōn often comes at the beginning, nōn-ne became common enough that you'll often see it analyzed as a word of its own, rather ...


6

You've indeed stumbled upon an interesting construction. The Lewis & Short entry for induo mentions several ways of using induo: induo vestem induor vestem me in vestem induo me veste induo The second construction, which you are interested in, employs a so-called Greek accusative, though Gildersleeve's Latin Grammar remarks that it is "different" from ...


6

As L&S put it, in their classic textwall style (entry for in, II.C.2): Of the object or end in view, regarded also as the motive of action or effect: “non te in me illiberalem, sed me in se neglegentem putabit,” Cic. Fam. 13, 1, 16: “neglegentior in patrem,” Just. 32, 3, 1: “in quem omnes intenderat curas,” Curt. 3, 1, 21: “quos ardere in proelia vidi,...


2

This rule applies to Russian, Germanic languages, Latin and ancient Greek as far as I know. So I suspect that it's a feature of the proto-IE language.


1

Francesco Cavalli called the mass he wrote in 1675 Missa pro defunctis per octo vocibus and that's still the name by which we know it. No doubt it should read "Missa pro defunctis octo vocibus", where octo vocibus is in the dative.


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