13

The subject is latus. Definition 6 in OLD is most relevant here: 6 (of solid objects, usu. w. abl.) To be bathed or soaked (in a fluid specified or implied), run, stream, overflow, etc.) For comparison, there's Ovid Metamorphoses 9.57-58: vix tamen inserui sudore fluentia multo bracchia, vix solvi duros a corpore nexus. ...arms streaming (with) ...


12

The macron (the bar over the a) is a modern reading aid, not a compulsory orthographic convention. It's not usually written outside of dictionaries, grammar, and text editions prepared specifically for introductory Latin courses, even when it leads to ambiguities in interpretation like this. (The Romans did sometimes distinguish long vowels epigraphically ...


6

The entry for pro in Lewis & Short mentions at II that the preposition pro comes with the ablative but remarks that accusative is possible in late Latin. As you quote a coat of arms, influences of late Latin are certainly a possibility. I don't know what the relative frequency of the two cases with pro is in any given era — apart from the accusative ...


5

I think the ablative of agent in your example sentence is a red herring, and you can state your question in more general terms. In fact, I think the simplest case to look at is a noun + adjective, since the amata in your case is functioning as an adjective. The most important thing to know about a relative pronoun is that it begins a relative clause. A ...


4

More context is always helpful with questions like this. But I would assume that quo goes with genere: "of which kind of death it is difficult to speak", or taking quo as a connective relative equivalent to a demonstrative, "Of this kind of death it is difficult to speak".


3

My non-expert literal translation: It had been cut in February, the flesh soft enough, sour-sweet, almost wine-like. The phrase carne satis molli is an ablative absolute. It has no grammatical connection with the rest of the sentence; molli modifies carne, which is neither a subject nor subject-complement of the verb, erat. The adjective vinoso modifies ...


1

This means "Ours by the sea"* (or, if you want to supply a noun where Latin will let an adjective do the job of a noun "Our place by the sea"). Thus, nostrum is nominative and mare ablative. It would be a nice motto for a family with a sea-side home, or for a sea-side city. Alternative interpretations, with nostrum modifying mare, are ...


1

Another possible interpretation would be that pro (alternatively written proh) is an interjection of sorrow or desperation, meaning something like “alas,” “alack”. While often used with a nominative or vocative (pro dii immortales, pro sancte Juppiter etc), it is also found with the accusative: pro deorum hominumque fidem! (which makes sense because the ...


1

Francesco Cavalli called the mass he wrote in 1675 Missa pro defunctis per octo vocibus and that's still the name by which we know it. No doubt it should read "Missa pro defunctis octo vocibus", where octo vocibus is in the dative.


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