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11 votes

Meaning of "virō" in description of Lavinia

As the Lewis & Short entry for maturus notes under meaning II.A, a common construction is maturus + dat., which means "ripe/ready for X." It gives examples such as: maturus bello = old ...
brianpck's user avatar
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10 votes
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Domino notus erat: Agent ablative without a preposition?

Domino is dative, not ablative. English has the same idiom: 'known to the master.'
cnread's user avatar
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What is the difference between "in umerīs" and "in umerōs"?

In + ablative means "in/on something" while doing the verb. In + accusative means "into/onto something", i.e. the verb involves moving/transferring something else into/onto the ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
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What's the role of the pronoun "iis" in this context?

This is often called the Dative of the Person Judging (aka Dativus iudicantis; cf. also the "Dative of Relation": e.g. see this link), which is sometimes considered as a specific case of the ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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LLPSI: Ch. 13, Ln. 120, 'Hōc annī tempore...'

Hoc...tempore is known as an ablative of time: Time when, or within which, is expressed by the ablative... cōnstitūtā diē on the appointed day prīmā lūce at daybreak quotā hōrā? at what hour? tertiā ...
cmw's user avatar
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Why ablative "corporibus" and "funeribus" are used in this excerpt from Tacitus "Annals" XVI?

They're formed with the verb complebantur, which is accompanied by an ablative of material. The translation makes it clear: But the houses were filled with lifeless bodies (corporibus exanimis), the ...
cmw's user avatar
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Why ablative "natu" is used in these expressions?

Natus is a noun used only in the ablative singular natu “by birth”.
fdb's user avatar
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5 votes
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Usage of ablative in a sentence by Curtius

Generally, If the nouns in question answer questions like in what manner, how, with what, those nouns should appear in the ablative. this is pretty much a book-case for the ablative here. so an ...
d_e's user avatar
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4 votes

What is the difference between "in umerīs" and "in umerōs"?

…carry sacks in their arms. (Abl. —> no motion happening with the sacks) …placed the sheep into his arms. (Acc. -> motion happening with the sheep)
Stephen Darrenkamp's user avatar
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Reason for ablative case in "praesidioque decorique parentibus esse"

This is the double dative construction. The praesidio or decori (both dative, not ablative) is the dative of purpose and parentibus is the dative of advantage. The terminology varies, but the same ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes

Why do we write “cum marito eius” (cum + abl+ gen.) and not “cum marito ei” (cum + abl+ abl.)?

I think there are two issues that would be helpful to clarify here: ei is the dative (not the ablative) of the demonstrative pronoun is/ea/id. Since Latin does not have a third-person personal ...
brianpck's user avatar
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Domino notus erat: Agent ablative without a preposition?

A very similar question was raised and answered in this forum. As you can see, some people will tell you that domino is a "dative of agent" (see Section 375 of Allen & Greenough: "...
Mitomino's user avatar
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3 votes

Domino notus erat: Agent ablative without a preposition?

According to the Diccionari bàsic llatí–català edited by Enciclopèdia Catalana, notus can work as an adjective which, used with genitive or infinitive, means known to or famous to. So, as pointed out ...
Charo's user avatar
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3 votes

What's the role of the pronoun "iis" in this context?

It's dative. "To those, who sail towards those seven stars, east is to the right, west is to the left, south is behind them.".
FlatAssembler's user avatar
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Is This Noun in the Dative or Ablative

Puero is a dative in apposition to mihi. Appositives in Latin often have an adverbial component (cf. A&G 282). Here it tells us when the statement applies. This construction is perhaps most ...
Kingshorsey's user avatar
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In Vulgate in Apocalypsis 20:4, why does it say "et regnaverunt cum Christo mille *annis*" (ablative?), rather than "...annos" (accusative)?

According to the grammars, the accusative answers the question “how long”, and the ablative tells us “when” or “within which time”. But I suspect that by the time of Jerome this distinction was no ...
fdb's user avatar
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