Skip to main content
12 votes

Why is nominative instead of ablative absolute used in 'Ibi egressi Trojani'?

Egressi Trojani is in the nominative because it's the subject of agerent. The structure of the sentence is a bit unusual, but it's clearer when you move the cum to its vanilla position before the ...
Cairnarvon's user avatar
  • 10.4k
10 votes
Accepted

Inveniturne participium futuri activi in ablativo absoluto?

Interesting post! See the following remark included in a related question: "as pointed out by Lavency (1985: 196) in his excellent descriptive grammar of Latin (VSVS. Grammaire latine. ...
Mitomino's user avatar
  • 8,911
10 votes

Scope of negation with absolute constructions

What follows is not an answer but just some initial thoughts related to your question. My first impression/intuition is like the one you express at the end of your post. I'd be surprised to find ...
Mitomino's user avatar
  • 8,911
9 votes
Accepted

What forms are the verbs in "Omnibus rebus paratis, Caesar milites naves conscendere jussit"?

You were spot on with your parsing of iussit; it is, in fact, the third person singular perfect active indicative of iubeō, iubēre, iussī, iussum. With regards to parātīs (the macrons should give a ...
Ethan Bierlein's user avatar
9 votes
Accepted

How "sōlā fidē" means what it is supposed to mean

The word solus is a little ambiguous. While it has been discussed before (here and here), the topic is certainly not exhausted. I can think of several translations of sola fide: By means of the ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
7 votes

Grammatical structure of "Obsidibus imperatis centum hos Haeduis custodiendos tradit"

Absolute means "syntactically unconnected to the rest of the sentence except as an adverbial adjunct to the praedicate". The real issue here is, I believe, not whether the ablative is ...
Cerberus's user avatar
  • 20.1k
7 votes
Accepted

What is the literary effect of an Ablative Absolute?

As the beginning of an answer: I doubt that anything can be said about the general literary effect of an ablative absolute, prescinding from other contextual considerations. The ablative absolute is ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 41.7k
7 votes
Accepted

Present Participles: can "respicienti" be part of an ablative absolute in this sentence?

As Sumelic says, both -i and -e can be used as the ablative ending of a participle. Even so, mixing them in the same sentence would probably be unusual. Respicienti is really a dative here; the new a....
Cerberus's user avatar
  • 20.1k
7 votes
Accepted

Can the absolute ablative be used with a prepositional phrase?

Although we do not have native competence of Latin, my impression is that alleged Ablative Absolute constructions like "Caesare Romae" or "Caesare in Hispania" are NOT possible. Or at least, after ...
Mitomino's user avatar
  • 8,911
6 votes

Can the absolute ablative be used with a prepositional phrase?

It is quite a usual thing in Latin to use the ablative case to indicate the circumstances under which the main clause's action (sc. that of the main verb) happens. In such a case, the rule is that the ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
  • 18.1k
6 votes
Accepted

How would you say "I think our stick insect will die by me giving it to our hamster to eat."? Can you use absolute ablative to mean a cause of death?

The subject of the ablative absolute tends to be different from that of the main clause. Therefore it is not a good choice. And even in a case where AA is a valid choice, it should probably be of the ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Subject of the ablative absolute in the main clause

In Classical Latin, the subject of the ablative absolute usually does not reappear in the main clause. The subject of the the AA is illa and the dative ei refers to the same person. I don't have more ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

Declension usage for the King on a diploma

Congratulations on your graduation! I would translate it along these lines: Diarized document. During the reign of the most venerable Carl XVI Gustav king of Swedes, our merciful lord, by the order ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes

Grammatical structure of "Obsidibus imperatis centum hos Haeduis custodiendos tradit"

Does this sentence have an ablative absolute that connects grammatically to the rest of the sentence? As Joonas has already pointed out, this question can be answered/interpreted in different ways. ...
Mitomino's user avatar
  • 8,911
5 votes

Can a "dative of agent" appear in an Ablative Absolute construction (and, more generally, in a non-verbal context)?

Is this an example? Cicero: sibi enim bene gestae, mihi conservatae rei publicae dat testimonium. Perhaps it can be argued that sibi and mihi are datives of reference, but "agent" seems most ...
Kingshorsey's user avatar
  • 6,931
5 votes
Accepted

Can Gerundives be predicates of Ablative Absolutes?

Yes, the predicate of an ablative absolute can be a gerundive. But the matter is complicated by the question what a real ablative absolute is and what separates it from other constructions. You have ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
4 votes

Is "victa serpente" an ablative absolute?

Victa serpente is not to be interpreted/analyzed here as an "Ablative Absolute" but rather as a dominant participle construction (see below for a definition) depending on an adjective superbus, which ...
Mitomino's user avatar
  • 8,911
4 votes
Accepted

The difference between ablative absolute and a participle coniunctum

The question in the title is a bit strange, because present participles often occur in ablative absolutes. In your example, you seem to be aiming for the difference between perfect and present ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
4 votes

Grammatical structure of "Obsidibus imperatis centum hos Haeduis custodiendos tradit"

Does this sentence have an ablative absolute that connects grammatically to the rest of the sentence? I think it depends on what you mean by connecting grammatically. It is clear that hos means ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes

The difference between ablative absolute and a participle coniunctum

Diagramming the sentences will make clear the difference between an ablative absolute and a participle. Accipiens litteras, Caesar nuntium mittit. Here is how the notation works. When A and B are ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
3 votes
Accepted

Quo mortuo nuntiato (Cicero) // Ab urbe condita nuntiata (?)

I don't think nesting is a good way of describing this phenomenon. This is simply what happens when a clause with a predicate noun or adjective is transformed into an ablative absolute. Quo mortuo ...
Kingshorsey's user avatar
  • 6,931
2 votes

Quo mortuo nuntiato (Cicero) // Ab urbe condita nuntiata (?)

I also lack native competence in Latin, so I offer here an unauthoritative guess, mostly for comment from more-knowledgeable users. Quid discrimen? I'm thinking that to native speakers, grammatical ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
2 votes

Quo mortuo nuntiato (Cicero) // Ab urbe condita nuntiata (?)

If an answer based solely on your own examples would be acceptable, may I suggest the 'well-formed' examples in the second group have indeclinable substantives contributing to the Ablative Absolute. /...
Hugh's user avatar
  • 8,693
2 votes
Accepted

Why does the substantive come second in 'mutatis mutandis'?

Latin word order is free, and the parts of the absolute ablative can be in either order. One order might be more common than the other, but tendencies should not be taken as hard rules. To me capta ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
2 votes

Can the absolute ablative be used with a prepositional phrase?

It's an old Q, and completely answered by @TomCotton from the point of teaching/learning the Lating language, but I think it deserves a look from another angle, a purely linguistic rather than a ...
kkm mistrusts SE's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

participium coniunctum vs. ablative absolute of transitive deponent verbs

I don't think such a constraint exists; your sentence 2 seems well-formed. Here are two similar examples I found by searching for secuto on PHI. Suetonius, Vita Claudii 16.11: Notauitque multos, et ...
TKR's user avatar
  • 31.4k
1 vote

Cethegus (...) recitatis litteris debilitatus atque abiectus conscientia repente conticuit. (Cic. Catil. 3, 10)

Roberts and Wolfe in their edition of Cicero (1917) render it as "on the reading of the letters" and make the following grammatical reference to it: The Gerundive is the future passive ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
  • 7,079
1 vote

On the alleged ambiguity of the Ablative Absolute "Mutatis mutandis"

"mutatis mutandis" when translated into my Croatian language (which is egually synthetic language like Latin) corresponds as - promijenivši ono što treba promijeniti - and when transformed ...
Ivan Simundic's user avatar
1 vote

Can a "dative of agent" appear in an Ablative Absolute construction (and, more generally, in a non-verbal context)?

To the extent that the (typical) "dative of agent" has a syntactic distribution that is similar/identical to the so-called "dative of possession" (aka "dative with sum"), ...
Mitomino's user avatar
  • 8,911

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible