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Questions concerning Latin of the classical era, approximately 75 BCE to 300 CE

3
votes
In poems 24 and 25 of book 3 (which some editors see as together comprising one poem), Propertius breaks up with Cynthia. He states this most clearly in this excerpt: quinque tibi potui servire f …
answered Feb 3 '18 by Penelope
27
votes
Why did Roman authors never feel a need for word spacing? An interesting question because the Romans certainly accepted the notion of word division, at least until about 100 AD, at which point Romans …
answered Feb 19 '17 by Penelope
16
votes
Perhaps credulus? credula nec ravos timeant armenta leones gullible cattle no longer fear tawny lions Horace, Epodes, 16.33 Credula si fueris, aliae tua gaudia carpent If you are …
answered Apr 1 '18 by Penelope
10
votes
For natural monsters, perhaps belua: Belua immanis, crocodillus ille qui in Nilo gignitur … That colossal monster, the crocodile born in the Nile … Apuleius, Apologia, 8 Belua is often us …
answered Oct 23 '18 by Penelope
6
votes
Is there any justification for the use of titillo outside of its figurative sense of "titillate"? Yes, I think so. See Pliny the Elder, Natural History, book XI, 77:198 in eadem praecipua hilari …
answered Dec 20 '16 by Penelope
6
votes
Of the small puddles that collect after rain, classical Latin seems to prefer a small collection of water. For example, Lucretius uses conlectus aquae of a shallow puddle between paving stones, much …
answered Mar 1 '18 by Penelope
6
votes
LATIN senescens (from senescere - to grow old, weak, feeble; to waste away; to wane, fall off, decline) Can be used literally, naturally, of someone growing weak with old age, but also figuratively: …
answered Nov 27 '17 by Penelope
14
votes
Perhaps graeculus, often translated as Greekling? It refers to Greeks who held positions of some import in Roman society due to their education and higher learning yet were considered too Greek to ac …
answered Sep 27 '16 by Penelope
5
votes
Three examples I have just now come across (edit make that four examples - see "owl" below): Donkey Lucius, having been turned into a donkey tries to draw attention to his plight, by calling upon th …
answered Nov 17 '18 by Penelope
5
votes
Taking the following as an example: seu nihil militi, sive omnia concederentur concede either nothing to the army, or everything Tacitus, Annals, 1.36 we could perhaps adapt it to: seu nih …
answered Oct 23 '18 by Penelope
6
votes
I think Joonas has proved conclusively that neither Pliny nor any other ancient author mentioned a stilus plumbeus but nevertheless, for what it's worth, I also couldn't find anything. And then I t …
answered Mar 10 '18 by Penelope
12
votes
Frigidus / cold can be used metaphorically to describe any kind of speech that seems flat and lifeless, whether it was an attempt at humour or not. But here we see it being applied specifically to ba …
answered Jan 19 '17 by Penelope
7
votes
Perhaps optime natalis! / best of birthdays! from Ovid, Tristia, 5.5, line 13? Or even vivat … consumatque annos … suos / long life to her … and may she pass to the end of her years also …
answered Oct 30 '16 by Penelope
4
votes
Varro does mention a "night owl" (as in the bird), the noctua, which got its name: quod noctu canit et vigilat because it sings 'noctu' ('at night') and stays up overnight On the Latin Lan …
answered Nov 17 '18 by Penelope
4
votes
What's the closest word Classical Latin (Greek?) would have used for mobile machines, even if they don't have a human shape? (NB: this answer is adapted slightly from another answer I gave here) I t …
answered Sep 7 by Penelope

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