Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options user 68

Questions concerning Latin of the classical era, approximately 75 BCE to 300 CE

3
votes
The definition you cite for instruere is sparse and leaves most of the uses of the word uncovered. The definition from Lewis & Short is to build in or into to build, erect, construct To set …
answered Mar 18 '16 by Joel Derfner
6
votes
So actually your translation isn't correct—or, rather, it's technically correct, but it's not actually correct. I'll explain. (I should note that this is an edited version of my previous answer—the e …
answered Aug 7 '16 by Joel Derfner
3
votes
Hmm. I don't know of any corresponding idioms in Latin, but in general Latin is a pretty concrete language, shunning metaphor when it can, so my suspicion is that the way to say this is going to turn …
answered Apr 27 '16 by Joel Derfner
4
votes
Hmm. I'd actually suggest the gerundive: ad Latinam disputandam or Latinæ disputandæ causa. The Latin Library puts it nicely: The Gerundive (like the Gerund) may be used with ad + acc. or gen. + c …
answered Mar 16 '16 by Joel Derfner
8
votes
Well, there's the story from chapter five of Suetonius' life of Galba about how Tiberius cheated Galba out of his inheritance: Observavit ante omnis Liviam Augustam, cujus et vivae gratia plurimum …
answered Apr 16 '16 by Joel Derfner
4
votes
Would something as simple as Té (vós) summé præstolámur. or Scító (-óte) té (vós) valde exspectátum (-ós). do the trick? (I'm going with your real meaning rather than the specific sentence …
answered Jul 2 '16 by Joel Derfner
4
votes
An interesting question to which I don't actually know a definitive answer, but I'll try to shed what light I can. I glanced at the source you link and couldn't find tritavus, but it seems an obvious …
answered Feb 27 '16 by Joel Derfner
13
votes
Old Latin bears the same kind of relationship to Classical Latin as English of, a few centuries ago does to modern English. The oldest Old Latin texts we have, unless I'm remembering incorrectly, are …
answered Mar 27 '16 by Joel Derfner
9
votes
I'll just add that there's another word for "or," sive (or seu). It's used to mean "also known as" or to indicate that the speaker is indifferent as to which option is chosen. Si media nox est si …
answered Feb 27 '16 by Joel Derfner
12
votes
Unfortunately, it seems that people have tried for centuries to answer this question, with limited success or at least limited consistency. For example: In his 1841 Dictionary of Latin Synonymes, Lew …
answered May 15 '16 by Joel Derfner
10
votes
It's not just Latin. As far as I'm aware, the only language that has a future subjunctive is Spanish, and it's disappearing there as well. (I don't speak Spanish, so I can't say from personal experien …
answered Mar 3 '16 by Joel Derfner
16
votes
Seneca is your man. In Ep 122 he uses the word lychnobius: one who lives by lamplight. I'll quote the passage in full, because it's so great. Pedonem Albinovanum narrantem audieramus (erat aute …
answered Oct 4 '17 by Joel Derfner
7
votes
Smith's Introduction to Latin Prose Composition gives the following distinctions: Prœlium, i, an engagement, action, or skirmish. Pugna, æ, generally a close engagement, but often in a general sen …
answered Aug 8 '16 by Joel Derfner
7
votes
Well, I think the thing to do is to remember that, while ut has three different English meanings, it has only one Latin meaning and three uses. A Latin speaker might just as easily ask, "Why does Eng …
answered Mar 17 '16 by Joel Derfner
6
votes
1answer
In De Finibus 48, Cicero writes Qui ingenuis studiis atque artibus delectantur, nonne videmus eos nec valetudinis nec rei familiaris habere rationem omniaque perpeti ipsa cognitione et scientia ca …
asked May 20 '16 by Joel Derfner

15 30 50 per page