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Questions concerning Greek (New Testament or older) either in relation to Latin or in itself. New Testament Greek questions should focus on language, not exegesis.

4
votes
1answer
The Ancient Greek suffix -ίδης was used to form masculine patronymics - that is to say, one combines it with X to create a name meaning "Son of X". Examples: Ἀλκείδης ("son of Alkaios"), Ἡρακλεῖδαι … ("sons of Herakles"; -ῐ́δαι is the plural of -ίδης). Is there an existing feminine form of this suffix? If not, can such a feminine form be constructed using existing rules in Ancient Greek grammar? …
asked Jan 5 '18 by MarqFJA87
7
votes
3answers
Ancient Greek word that both derives from the same root as klepto- and is a noun that actually translates to "theft" (result: κλοπή klopḗ) The way κλοπή sounded for some reason prompted me to look up the … suffix -trophy on a hunch; and lo and behold, that one's Ancient Greek root is τροφή (trophḗ). It thus seems logical to me that the hypothetical suffix counterpart of klepto- would be -klopy. An …
asked Oct 9 '17 by MarqFJA87
6
votes
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of inflection? It's a bizarre anomaly, as in my experience I've never seen any Greek word (modern on ancient) that changes anything other than the last few letters when it's inflected. Is Διώνη truly …
asked Jan 5 '18 by MarqFJA87