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23 views

Pliny, Naturalis Historia Bk II, first para., “conplexus”

Pliny, Naturalis Historia Book II, paragraph I: Mundum et hoc—quocumque nomine alio caelum appellare libuit cuius circumflexu teguntur cuncta, numen esse credi par est, aeternum, inmensum, neque ...
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1answer
123 views

Can *esse* be elided with a dative of possession?

The possessive dative construction involves a subject possessee, a dative possessor, and a form of esse: Mihi soror est. Dicit sibi sororem esse. In this construction, is esse ever elided? That is, ...
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1answer
52 views

Translating “may turn into this”

I need some help to translate a phrase: That which was fabric/woven, may turn/become/transform into this My partner gave me some time ago, a handmade bracelet made from fabric, symbolising our ...
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2answers
62 views

Pronunciation of genitive proper-name epithets, e.g. Euonymus fortunei

What customs do the various Latin pronunciations have for pronouncing species epithets that are the genitive form of someone's name, e.g. Euonymus fortunei, named for Robert Fortune? In the English ...
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1answer
48 views

What is the best online Latin dictionary? [duplicate]

I'm familiar with perseus.tufts.edu and perseus.uchicago.edu and www.online-latin-dictionary.com. But I was curious to know what do you think is the best free online Latin dictionary?
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1answer
80 views

Instructional book for the Medieval philosophy student

I'm seeking for a book which contains several fragments of the medieval philosophical works, literally translates them and explains the obscure points for who wants to improve his Latin.
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2answers
91 views

What is Art's Mind in Latin?

I looked at Natura Artis Magistra ("nature is art's teacher"), so I think mens artis is the correct translation of "Art's Mind". How to translate "Art's Mind" (with art in the sense above) to Latin?
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1answer
62 views

idiom for 'Don't give up the day job'

One of my favourite phrases is 'Don't give up the day job' for when someone is not very good at something. I put together 'Noli labor a die dedere'. However 'labor' is more 'task' instead of 'job' and ...
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1answer
138 views

How would learning Latin only to read Latin change the way I should learn it?

So I studied GCSE Latin but there was no English to Latin on the Exam, we only ever had to read in Latin or translate from Latin into English. So my question is this: If I wanted to learn to read and ...
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1answer
73 views

How would I translate “Lead the way” or “Pathfinder”, “Leadership”

This is for a tattoo, so I want the meaning to be accurate. My friend who passed was an Aiborne Ranger and they had the motto of "Lead the Way" as they were the first into battle. It will be next to "...
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1answer
106 views

About the difference between the enclitic “ne” and the non-enclitic “ne”

So, I know that -ne is an enclitic to express a yes/no question. But, the "Ne", as a non-enclitic, as I understood it, could also be a word question. In "Ne....annon" or "Ne....necne" Meaning Is it....
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1answer
106 views

A Client Submits Feedback On Her Prostitutes

I am trying to translate the following line, inspired by a fatuous Roman spoof, "Plebs", in which two hapless new recruits to a cadre of male prostitutes, the "Knights of Eros", are being debriefed, ...
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1answer
66 views

Is this an accurate way to translate “addiditque sermo mihi est ad te cui ait loquere et ille”

addiditque sermo mihi est ad te cui ait loquere et ille 1 Kings 2:14 I'm attempting to use it as a formal Latin epigraph for a poem and want to know, if I were to translate it as a footnote or ...
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3answers
75 views

Which case is used for titles?

In an article from G. Peano, §1. Casus §2. Genere masculino, feminino et neutro §3. Numero singulare et plurale I wonder if casus should be understood as singular or as plural. As far as I know it ...
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1answer
44 views

Does anyone know of a resource that lists 'root morphemes' of latin words?

I having been searching the web like crazy trying to find a resource that list Latin root morphemes. That is, words which all share the same base meaning and are listed in their word families. For ...
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3answers
273 views

Translate “Strong by Choice”?

I would like to translate "Strong by Choice" to Latin as a motto for a charity. We have tried per arbitrium fortis but want to know if this can be improved.
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1answer
90 views

Help translating short poem for book

I'm writing a book right now about a cult. I've tried using google translate to take the initiation vows for the cult and put them in Latin, but it ends up terrible. If anyone could help me get this ...
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2answers
148 views

Is this translation right?

I'm doing English to Latin translation and wanted to know if anyone could help me address the mistakes of my translation: Who is there who would allow the city walls to be destroyed on account of ...
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1answer
236 views

Trying to translate 'Blood promises glory'

I'm trying to translate 'blood promises glory' into Latin. Google translate provided me with Sanguinis Promissa Gloria and I like it, sounds good, but I really want to run it past someone who actually ...
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1answer
59 views

Translation of US Army motto “This We'll Defend”

I am looking for a good translation of the US army motto, which is: This We'll Defend There are three variants of translation I have found: 1 Haec protegimus 2 Is nos mos vallo 3 Hoc defendam ...
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1answer
60 views

In the phrase Omnimoda potestate Antistes, should any of the words be capitalized?

In the phrase omnimoda potestate antistes, should any words be capitalized? And how would it be translated? It is in reference to a 16th century bishop who considered himself, omnimoda potestate ...
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0answers
72 views

What is the meaning of “cin” in the phrases “petras omnes cin cum…”?

So I've been trying to figure out the Latin lyircs in "Hellfire" from the video game Final Fantasy XV. It's really hard to make out what they're saying, and the only part that I've managed ...
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0answers
29 views

Incorrect Google translations of Thumb and Fingers in Latin - request for “correct” answers [duplicate]

I have a little familiarity with Latin, but Google Translate contradicts my expectations. thumb <---> abductor pollicis first finger <---> flexor hallucis second finger <---> digitus ...
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0answers
59 views

Eppur si muove word-to-word translation [closed]

It is translated on wikipedia as "Yet it moves", Galileo Galile's words against court. But If we translate it word-to-word what does it mean?
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0answers
34 views

Romans and Ancient Greek language [duplicate]

Is there evidence in the inscriptions, that Romans have realised, that Hellenic languages are very close to theirs own language!? It seems to be that the distinguish was applied to the Etruscan ...
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0answers
63 views

Is the New Testament Greek οὖν the same as the English “therefore”?

The Bible Greek word οὖν is often translated as therefore. However, grammatically, οὖν is a conjunction while the English therefore is an adverb. Semantically, therefore carries a strong sense of ...
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1answer
70 views

How to translate “Self-Isolation” and “Garden-Conversation” to Latin?

As new terminology enters the public lexicon how would some of these be expressed in Latin? Self-Isolation: from segrego with a reflexive pronoun: "se segregat" = "he isolates himself. The reflexive ...
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0answers
43 views

Variation on Descartes' famous phrase

I would like to put a twist on Descartes' famous phrase, "Cogito, ergo sum". Effectively I want to say, "I am... I think?", raising the question of whether the existence we perceive with our senses ...
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0answers
56 views

Proper Translation of “Faith of Nine” to Latin

I am trying to verify the correct translation of the phrase "Faith of Nine" to latin. I typed it in on Google Translate and it gave me the following translation: Fidei Autem Novem. This is for a ...
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0answers
37 views

Translate into Latin: “To will the impossible” and “with will and sacrifice”

Hello and thank you in advance. Two phrases I am interested being in Latin: "To will the impossible" and "With will and sacrifice" First one being similar to "If there is a will, there's a way." ...
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0answers
62 views

Is an Ablative Absolute construction like “portā clausā” ambiguous in Early Latin?

As a follow-up question of two previous posts (cf. here and here), I was wondering if an Ablative Absolute construction like portā clausā is ambiguous in Early Latin as it is in Classical Latin. For ...
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0answers
56 views

Ablatives of Agent in Ablative Absolutes in Early Latin?

It is (often) said that participles in Ablative Absolutes in Early Latin have an adjectival nature (e.g., see Ruppel (2013: 124): "the Early Latin Ablative Absolute is not strongly verbal at all"). ...
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2answers
47 views

When conjugating a verb, when should the vowel preceding a personal ending contain a macron? [duplicate]

I am working through ch 1 of Wheelock's Latin, and I am confused as to when the vowel immediately preceding a personal ending should receive a macron. For example, here is the present indicative ...
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0answers
55 views

Checking Greek declensions: software or reference?

Although quite a few Greek words follow the same simple patterns of declension, I'm finding that there are enough complications that I'm often unsure of whether I'm getting it right. Is there a ...
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0answers
35 views

Latin for “vexatious Litigant”

My days of decent knowledge of Latin are a little in the past since I passed my Latinum, and I am trying to get a good translation for what modern US courst call "vexatious litigant" into Latin for a ...
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0answers
94 views

When God Softens The Heart

Q: How do you say "open your mind"in latin? (it's for a tattoo) was never resolved. A literal translation of "open your mind" would not work; therefore, some lateral thinking. From ...
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0answers
105 views

Translating “win against all odds”

Does the phrase "non obstante omnes, vinco" have a coherent meaning? I wanted it to mean something like "in spite it all (or) against all odds, win/conquer!". I want to get this phrase engraved in ...
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0answers
31 views

How did the preposition “de” evolve into meaning “from”?

I see that in reconstructed PIE "de" or "do" has a meaning of "towards" which is retained in Germanic "to" and Slavic "do". But in Latin "de" has a meaning of "from". Is that simply due it taking the ...
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0answers
29 views

Is there a tool/website to see which non-Latin words are derived from a given Latin word?

One way I use to learn Latin vocabulary is to seek for derived Spanish/English words which meaning I know. For instance, gressus derived into egresar and ingresar, Spanish words which mean to exit ("e[...
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0answers
49 views

Is it possible to use a prepositional phrase with a gerundive/gerund?

can we use prepositional phrases (like "de domo") linked to a gerund or a gerundive, can it act as an object?
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0answers
26 views

How do you understand the gerunds in miserando atque eligendo? [duplicate]

Pope Francis's coat of arms has the phrase miserando atque eligendo. My knowledge of Latin grammar has faded, but if I recall correctly, this phrase uses two gerunds. I think one translation is "by ...
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1answer
323 views

Mysterious word for “expert” in an Italian anthology's version of Sappho LP 21

In this Italian anthology, LP 21 l. 2 (the first line where the papyrus has letters) is read as containing επαβολησ (and perhaps vestigia around it). The first word in the translation is "esperta", ...
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0answers
29 views

Untraceable word in a combination of LP fragments

LP 68(b) and 69 have been combined into a single text by the impression that they were «ex eadem parte papyri» and by the one letter split between the two. The resulting text, found in 6.A.iv here, ...
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0answers
51 views

I need help translating two sentences into Latin [closed]

Phrase 1 : Life is in the doing. Phrase 2 : The wood belongs to the families who have their roots in it.
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0answers
415 views

please translate, ‘forward, always forward’. and ‘what’s behind us is behind us’. thanks [closed]

Would you please translate the following? ‘forward, always forward’ and ‘what’s behind us is behind us’. Thank you.
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0answers
37 views

Natural or unflavoured products

There are a number of different flavours of, say, yogurts, and one of them is plain, without any added flavours besides what is needed to make the yogurt. In English this flavour seems to be often ...
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0answers
58 views

How to express “the best myself” in latin?

I am currently trying to translate "May I forge the best me" "May I forge" seems easily translated as the present subjunctive first person "excudam". However, I can't find how to express the rest. I ...
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0answers
156 views

About Sappho Lobel-Page 101

This is kind of a mess. Let me first report how I tackled it when I first translated all (or most) of Sappho. Below is the translation of an extract of the Paracritical note I made back then, the ...
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0answers
44 views

About the part in cruces of Sappho Lobel-Page 46

The part of fragment in the title reads: κἂν μέν τε τύλαγκας ἀσπόλεα Now, the only easy amendation that comes to mind here (other than erasing the space after τε) is κἂν->κὰμ. That gives us three ...
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1answer
103 views

About an Athenaeus quote marginally related to Sappho

Here is the quote: ἐκαλεῖτο δέ τις καὶ βαλανωτὴ φιάλη, ἧς τῷ πυθμένι χρυσοῖ ὑπέκειντο ἀστράγαλοι. Σῆμος δ᾽ ἐν Δήλῳ ἀνακεῖσθαί φησι χαλκοῦν φοίνικα, Ναξίων ἀνάθημα, καὶ καρυωτὰς φιάλας χρυσᾶς. ...

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