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71 views

What is the meaning of “cin” in the phrases “petras omnes cin cum…”?

So I've been trying to figure out the Latin lyircs in "Hellfire" from the video game Final Fantasy XV. It's really hard to make out what they're saying, and the only part that I've managed ...
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0answers
29 views

Incorrect Google translations of Thumb and Fingers in Latin - request for “correct” answers [duplicate]

I have a little familiarity with Latin, but Google Translate contradicts my expectations. thumb <---> abductor pollicis first finger <---> flexor hallucis second finger <---> digitus ...
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0answers
54 views

Eppur si muove word-to-word translation [closed]

It is translated on wikipedia as "Yet it moves", Galileo Galile's words against court. But If we translate it word-to-word what does it mean?
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0answers
34 views

Romans and Ancient Greek language [duplicate]

Is there evidence in the inscriptions, that Romans have realised, that Hellenic languages are very close to theirs own language!? It seems to be that the distinguish was applied to the Etruscan ...
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0answers
61 views

Is the New Testament Greek οὖν the same as the English “therefore”?

The Bible Greek word οὖν is often translated as therefore. However, grammatically, οὖν is a conjunction while the English therefore is an adverb. Semantically, therefore carries a strong sense of ...
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0answers
47 views

Self-Isolation to Garden-Conversation

As new terminology enters the public lexicon how would some of these be expressed in Latin? Self-Isolation: from segrego with a reflexive pronoun: "se segregat" = "he isolates himself. The reflexive ...
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0answers
42 views

Variation on Descartes' famous phrase

I would like to put a twist on Descartes' famous phrase, "Cogito, ergo sum". Effectively I want to say, "I am... I think?", raising the question of whether the existence we perceive with our senses ...
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0answers
55 views

Proper Translation of “Faith of Nine” to Latin

I am trying to verify the correct translation of the phrase "Faith of Nine" to latin. I typed it in on Google Translate and it gave me the following translation: Fidei Autem Novem. This is for a ...
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0answers
37 views

Translate into Latin: “To will the impossible” and “with will and sacrifice”

Hello and thank you in advance. Two phrases I am interested being in Latin: "To will the impossible" and "With will and sacrifice" First one being similar to "If there is a will, there's a way." ...
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0answers
62 views

Is an Ablative Absolute construction like “portā clausā” ambiguous in Early Latin?

As a follow-up question of two previous posts (cf. here and here), I was wondering if an Ablative Absolute construction like portā clausā is ambiguous in Early Latin as it is in Classical Latin. For ...
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0answers
55 views

Ablatives of Agent in Ablative Absolutes in Early Latin?

It is (often) said that participles in Ablative Absolutes in Early Latin have an adjectival nature (e.g., see Ruppel (2013: 124): "the Early Latin Ablative Absolute is not strongly verbal at all"). ...
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2answers
45 views

When conjugating a verb, when should the vowel preceding a personal ending contain a macron? [duplicate]

I am working through ch 1 of Wheelock's Latin, and I am confused as to when the vowel immediately preceding a personal ending should receive a macron. For example, here is the present indicative ...
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0answers
54 views

Checking Greek declensions: software or reference?

Although quite a few Greek words follow the same simple patterns of declension, I'm finding that there are enough complications that I'm often unsure of whether I'm getting it right. Is there a ...
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0answers
34 views

Latin for “vexatious Litigant”

My days of decent knowledge of Latin are a little in the past since I passed my Latinum, and I am trying to get a good translation for what modern US courst call "vexatious litigant" into Latin for a ...
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0answers
94 views

When God Softens The Heart

Q: How do you say "open your mind"in latin? (it's for a tattoo) was never resolved. A literal translation of "open your mind" would not work; therefore, some lateral thinking. From ...
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0answers
96 views

Translating “win against all odds”

Does the phrase "non obstante omnes, vinco" have a coherent meaning? I wanted it to mean something like "in spite it all (or) against all odds, win/conquer!". I want to get this phrase engraved in ...
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0answers
31 views

How did the preposition “de” evolve into meaning “from”?

I see that in reconstructed PIE "de" or "do" has a meaning of "towards" which is retained in Germanic "to" and Slavic "do". But in Latin "de" has a meaning of "from". Is that simply due it taking the ...
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0answers
29 views

Is there a tool/website to see which non-Latin words are derived from a given Latin word?

One way I use to learn Latin vocabulary is to seek for derived Spanish/English words which meaning I know. For instance, gressus derived into egresar and ingresar, Spanish words which mean to exit ("e[...
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48 views

Is it possible to use a prepositional phrase with a gerundive/gerund?

can we use prepositional phrases (like "de domo") linked to a gerund or a gerundive, can it act as an object?
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0answers
26 views

How do you understand the gerunds in miserando atque eligendo? [duplicate]

Pope Francis's coat of arms has the phrase miserando atque eligendo. My knowledge of Latin grammar has faded, but if I recall correctly, this phrase uses two gerunds. I think one translation is "by ...
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1answer
300 views

Mysterious word for “expert” in an Italian anthology's version of Sappho LP 21

In this Italian anthology, LP 21 l. 2 (the first line where the papyrus has letters) is read as containing επαβολησ (and perhaps vestigia around it). The first word in the translation is "esperta", ...
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0answers
29 views

Untraceable word in a combination of LP fragments

LP 68(b) and 69 have been combined into a single text by the impression that they were «ex eadem parte papyri» and by the one letter split between the two. The resulting text, found in 6.A.iv here, ...
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0answers
51 views

I need help translating two sentences into Latin [closed]

Phrase 1 : Life is in the doing. Phrase 2 : The wood belongs to the families who have their roots in it.
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0answers
411 views

please translate, ‘forward, always forward’. and ‘what’s behind us is behind us’. thanks [closed]

Would you please translate the following? ‘forward, always forward’ and ‘what’s behind us is behind us’. Thank you.
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0answers
36 views

Natural or unflavoured products

There are a number of different flavours of, say, yogurts, and one of them is plain, without any added flavours besides what is needed to make the yogurt. In English this flavour seems to be often ...
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0answers
55 views

How to express “the best myself” in latin?

I am currently trying to translate "May I forge the best me" "May I forge" seems easily translated as the present subjunctive first person "excudam". However, I can't find how to express the rest. I ...
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0answers
156 views

About Sappho Lobel-Page 101

This is kind of a mess. Let me first report how I tackled it when I first translated all (or most) of Sappho. Below is the translation of an extract of the Paracritical note I made back then, the ...
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0answers
41 views

About the part in cruces of Sappho Lobel-Page 46

The part of fragment in the title reads: κἂν μέν τε τύλαγκας ἀσπόλεα Now, the only easy amendation that comes to mind here (other than erasing the space after τε) is κἂν->κὰμ. That gives us three ...
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1answer
103 views

About an Athenaeus quote marginally related to Sappho

Here is the quote: ἐκαλεῖτο δέ τις καὶ βαλανωτὴ φιάλη, ἧς τῷ πυθμένι χρυσοῖ ὑπέκειντο ἀστράγαλοι. Σῆμος δ᾽ ἐν Δήλῳ ἀνακεῖσθαί φησι χαλκοῦν φοίνικα, Ναξίων ἀνάθημα, καὶ καρυωτὰς φιάλας χρυσᾶς. ...
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0answers
69 views

What is up with these codices?

Sorry for the vague title, but that is really the question. The problem is with the manuscript sources for Lobel-Page incerti auctoris 24. From Edmonds on, the sources are reported as: υεσζερυμηνιον ...
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0answers
79 views

“Obeying the law” in Latin

How to say "Obeying the law" or "we will obey the law" in Latin, as something like a slogan?
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0answers
33 views

How to translate “associative movement”

How could we translate "associative movement" in Latin? I know "association" is usually "consociatio", but what about the adjective? "Associative movement" means (more or less) the fact that people ...
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0answers
90 views

What semantic notions underlie 'heat' and 'cold, moist humour'? [duplicate]

[ Etymonline : ] [5.] late 14c., fleem "viscid mucus" (the stuff itself and also regarded as a bodily humor), from Old French fleume (13c., Modern French flegme), [4.] from Late Latin phlegma, ...
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0answers
40 views

Did the Romans distinguish derivation and loan?

I learned from this question that the Romans used the same verb mutuari both for loaning words from Greek and deriving new words within Latin. Are there any examples in classical literature that make ...
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0answers
101 views

What is the relation between -men and -mentum?

When answering this question about incrementum, I recalled the similarity of the suffixes -mentum and -men. If the linked Wiktionary pages are to be trusted, they are etymologically related, both ...
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0answers
155 views

How to know long and short vowels if it is not marked? [duplicate]

Latin has vowels which are long and short. The long ones are marked by a dash on the top of the letter. How do I know how to pronounce the letters if the long and short vowels are not marked in a text?...
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0answers
76 views

Numbers in call signs

Various military vehicles have often call signs containing a numbers. For a quick example, you can watch a little bit of this YouTube video. I would like to know how to render such call signs in Latin,...
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0answers
69 views

What does “de” mean in “Ego de to my liking”?

In the classic school interchange Quis? Ego de to my liking. What grammatical part is the "de" playing?
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0answers
292 views

List of false friends

Is there a short list of the most common false friends for translating Latin into English?
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0answers
142 views

What did 'prō' mean in 'prōrogō' ? What is its Semantic Field?

[ Etymonline : ]   [...]   from Latin prorogare, literally "to ask publicly," from pro "before" (see pro-) + rogare "to ask" (see rogation). Perhaps the original sense in ...
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1answer
73 views

What underlying semantic notions connect 'campus' to the PIE root *kam-p- (to bend)?

Univ. Texas's page on kam-p-   'to bend' states: 'Semantic Field: to Bend'. Then I saw campus (plain, campus, open field) listed, but what semantic notions underlie it and 'to bend'? I can ...
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2answers
1k views

“Et tu, Brute?”

"Et tu, Brute?" Julius Caesar's last words; according to William Shakespeare's play of the same name. There seems to be a difference of opinion regarding the exact translation and thus, too, ...
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2answers
110 views

Why was the subjunctive mood 'so called because the Greek subjunctive mood is used almost exclusively in subordinate clauses'?

Concerning the adjective "subjunctive", OED (3rd ed., 2012) mentions (emphasis mine): Post-classical Latin subiunctivus is a translation equivalent of Hellenistic Greek ὑποτακτικός , which as a ...
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1answer
73 views

How does purchasing provisions or catering semantically relate to facilitating phagocytosis?

Why did physician choose obsōnāre to create opsonin? Rendering pathogens more susceptible to phagocytosis doesn't feel connected to purchasing provisions or catering. Etymology: < classical Latin ...
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1answer
79 views

Has 'com-' been a causative prefix?

constitute {verb}     Etymology : [..] con- intensive + statuĕre to set up, place: [...] 6. To make (a person or thing) something; to establish or set up as. (With obj. and compl.) Cf. 2. 8. To make ...
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3answers
133 views

Meaning of “amore honora, libertatem cura” [closed]

What is the closest meaning of this statement? Single comma there is intentional, it's not an enumeration. I understand that liberty cures, but struggling to connect the two words in first part.
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1answer
122 views

Link to download Cambridge Latin course [closed]

I would want the assistance of someone who will provide me with a link to download Cambridge Latin course book 3 or upload to upload if you have
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1answer
168 views

NSFW - Trying to create a Latin motto for a coat of arms - Edited for clarity

So, I took a couple years of Latin in school, but it's been awhile. I was trying to create this motto, and I'm not sure if I'm declining the nouns properly. Also not sure I remember if word order is ...
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1answer
567 views

What does the ''Tempus Praeteritum'' mean?

I've got a test tomorrow and I have to learn the list of "Tempus praeteritum". The problem is, that I don't know what it means and where it's used for. Can anybody help me?
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2answers
60 views

What is the translation of “numerus qui est minor quam nullus”

I have difficulties on translating the sentence "numerus qui est minor quam nullus". What's the English translation of this?

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