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3
votes
0answers
25 views

What is the closest Latin equivalent to the modern conception of “family”?

When translating the word "family" into Latin it seems obvious to go to "familia". However, multiple sources (most quoting Richard Saller) tell me that "familia" derives ...
-1
votes
0answers
21 views

Are there proper “SI” Latin abbreviations such as “s” for second, “h” for hour and “a” for year, but for minute, hour, week, and quarter?

I've spent a massive amount of time and effort now, but simply cannot find out what single-character abbreviations to use for the missing ones here: second = s minute = ? hour = h day = ? week = ? ...
2
votes
1answer
37 views

¿Was “grosso modo” popularised from Latin or Italian?

Grosso modo is a phrase of Latin origin, meaning "approximately". The phrase has been adopted in many languages (like English, French, Dutch, etc), as the referred link testifies. The ...
1
vote
1answer
27 views

Space Force Motto: Semper supera or semper supra?

This came up recently and as far as I understand it, supera is correct, not supra. Partly because supera has the dual meaning of above (preposition) and space, or celestial (neutral noun). Supra on ...
0
votes
0answers
17 views

What are the meaning of these sentences? Christiani victores obsessi

Christiani victores obsessi. Enumeratio civitatum persequitur. Praelium navale Genuensium contra Graecos. Genuenses apud Laodiciam hiemantur. These sentences are from a medieval sources.(Some title in ...
3
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0answers
18 views

French certification for Latin

I have been learning Latin on my own for many years and would like to teach private lessons. For this it would be useful to have a level certification or examination results. Is there anything like ...
2
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0answers
27 views

Latin version of “non ho che un” or “je n'ai qu'un”

At least Italian and French have an idiomatic way to say "I have only one friend": Non ho che un amico. Je n'ai qu'un ami. Finnish has the same thing: "Minulla ei ole kuin yksi ystävä....
0
votes
0answers
33 views

Translation of natus est in morte

I thought this means born in death but I’m not sure. Can anyone help me out I never studied Latin seriously
2
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1answer
49 views

participium coniunctum vs. ablative absolute of transitive deponent verbs

I was wondering why the "active meaning" and the transitivity of deponent perfect participles like cohortatus in (1) are not (?) preserved in the Ablative Absolute in (2). Why is it the case ...
1
vote
0answers
31 views

How can a computer tell the difference between I and J?

Most modern editions don't distinguish vocalic I from consonantal J. Most of the time, this doesn't create any real ambiguity. However, for certain purposes it can be useful to know the difference: ...
10
votes
2answers
1k views

Does Latin have any words for specific numbers apart from the numbers themselves (akin to the English “dozen”, for example)

In English, many numbers have specific words that denote them, distinct from the number itself. For example "dozen" means group of 12; "gross" means 144; and "score" ...
4
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0answers
84 views

Are any phonemic distinctions not represented in Latin?

Latin orthography seems to have been relatively phonemic. In other words, if long vowels are marked somehow (macrons or apices), there seems to be a straightforward mapping between letters and ...
1
vote
0answers
66 views

What is the meaning of “cin” in the phrases “petras omnes cin cum…”?

So I've been trying to figure out the Latin lyircs in "Hellfire" from the video game Final Fantasy XV. It's really hard to make out what they're saying, and the only part that I've managed ...
4
votes
1answer
145 views

Latin influences in Spanish

Spanish has a lot of influences from Latin. One of them is the -ar, -er, and -ir verbs. Accordding to http://spanishlinguist.us/2013/10/the-origins-of-spanish-ar-er-and-ir-verbs: ""Latin’s -...
7
votes
4answers
297 views

Does D/L variation go back to a dl cluster?

As outlined here in “Indo-European *d, *l and *dl” by Tim Pulju, there’s a hypothesis going back to Hamp 1972 that the l in Latin lacrima and d in the archaic variant dacruma both represent a dl ...
3
votes
1answer
49 views

A list of common different spelling-variants

The beginner (like me) might occasionally find a word he is not familiar with. It is usually easy to retrieve the base-form (nom. or stem for a verb) and find it in a dictionary. Even more, there are ...
6
votes
0answers
59 views

What was the use and frequency of use of Latin “mactāre”?

In What are the key differences between the main Latin verbs meaning "to kill"? we saw a lot of verbs meaning "to kill" and the differences between them. The fun part of it is that ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

Are concubine and concupiscence ultimately related?

Phonetically and semantically, it seemed clear to me that concubine and concupiscence should share a root; however, Wiktionary (1, 2) and Etymonline (3, 4) both point to different Latin roots. ...
3
votes
1answer
121 views

“Once upon a time”

The English phrase "once upon a time" at the beginning of a story immediately sets the genre and style to a great extent. Is there a similar device, possibly a phrase, in Latin? It does not ...
4
votes
1answer
111 views

Translation of a Latin verse in a book on the history of mathematics

A latin poem by Friedrich Leo appears in a book I have read for some time, and the author cited a part of it(the complete version can be seen here) when he was talking about Hamilton Unde ...
4
votes
1answer
81 views

Translation of the phrase “You exist, thus I believe”

What is Latin for “You exist, thus I believe”? Please state which dictionary you have used (if you have used any).
1
vote
1answer
116 views

Can *esse* be elided with a dative of possession?

The possessive dative construction involves a subject possessee, a dative possessor, and a form of esse: Mihi soror est. Dicit sibi sororem esse. In this construction, is esse ever elided? That is, ...
8
votes
3answers
535 views

Vowel shortening before another vowel: Exceptions

I am rather ashamed to admit that I used to pronounce Alexandrea (or Alexandria, cf. Ἀλεξάνδρεια) incorrectly in Latin, that is I mistakenly applied the famous rule "vocalis ante vocalem ...
9
votes
2answers
303 views

“Interdum sane, qui cogitare se dicit nondum constitutum sibi certi quidquam fatetur”

In the Thesaurus of Iohannes Matthias Gesnerus under cogito: (clearer link) inter cogitare et deliberare hoc interest, cogitare est dubitare, deliberare, confirmare. Haec Nonius 5,28. Interdum sane, ...
2
votes
1answer
41 views

Preposition of agent

Is it better to say a lectica portatur or in lectica portatur if it's the lectīcā who is the agent? Gratias plurimas.
6
votes
1answer
86 views

Difference between 'urbe' and 'oppidum'?

I have found that LLPSI uses oppidum to describe cities (at least in the early chapters) while Duolingo uses urbe. What is the difference, and which should I usually use?
5
votes
0answers
35 views

Female Names and Heritable *Cognomina*

Suppose I want to speak of the daughter of a man with a heritable cognonmen. Let us take Marcus Tullius Cicero as an example. If I want to clarify that the Tullia I am speaking of is his daughter (...
3
votes
1answer
151 views

Impersonal Verbs: Are Active Transitives Possible?

Latin utilizes some verbs that pretty much only occur impersonally, like oportet. One can also regularly form impersonal actives from intransitive verbs like placeo and impersonal passives from ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

Translating “may turn into this”

I need some help to translate a phrase: That which was fabric/woven, may turn/become/transform into this My partner gave me some time ago, a handmade bracelet made from fabric, symbolising our ...
3
votes
1answer
121 views

Translation of the title of a 17th century map of underground waterways

A picture by the 17th century Jesuit scholar Athanasius Kircher, explaining his theory of underground waterways connecting all bodies of water on Earth, is titled: Systema ideale quo exprimitur, ...
6
votes
1answer
752 views

Distinguishing house from home

The common word domus can mean both "house" and "home". How can I make a distinction between a house and a home in Latin? For example, I might buy a house but it doesn't feel like ...
7
votes
1answer
107 views

Why is *salāta feminine?

OED traces the "salad" family of words (Portuguese salada, Fra. salate, Spa. ensalada, Ita. insalata etc.) to spoken Latin *salāta, from the verb salāre. One notices that salāta as well as ...
6
votes
4answers
2k views

A personal name ending in -ua: is it male or female?

We have the name of a Romano-British Potter from the 2nd century A.D. whose name is SECVNDVA. Is this a male or a female name?
5
votes
1answer
76 views

Why is the Chapel in the Tower of London St Peter AD Vincula, not St Peter in Vinculis?

Why is the Chapel in the Tower of London "St Peter ad Vincula" and not "St Peter in Vinculis"
8
votes
2answers
447 views

“cenacula dicuntur, ad quae scalis ascenditur” - why passive singular (ascenditur)?

According to Festus (can be found in L&S under cenaculum): cenacula dicuntur, ad quae scalis ascenditur While the overall meaning of the statement is quite clear (namely that the upper room that ...
3
votes
1answer
59 views

Translating a text about “responsions moldavice”, 1524

I try to translate the following text: 1524, "Acta Tomiciana: epistole, legationes, responsa, actiones, res geste Sigismundi I Regis Poloniae", Volume 7 "Sed cum preterita magis ...
7
votes
1answer
83 views

-whatever suffix

Is there a Latin suffix meaning “-whatever”? E.g.: Wikipedia, Wikisource, … Wikiwhatever. Vicipaedia, Vicifons, … Vici…(?). (But I'm not even sure that -whatever itself is a correct English suffix.)
4
votes
1answer
317 views

Translating a text about Moldavia from 1597

Could someone translate this text from 1597? I am not sure the text is correct, because of the automatic recognition and some manual fixes: Moldavia autem à quibusdam major, Nigra, sive superior ...
3
votes
1answer
114 views

Is this translation for “If I cannot move Heaven, I will raise Hell.” correct?

I want to make sure this is the correct translation for “If I cannot move Heaven, I will raise Hell.” Flectere si nequeo superos, Acheronta noveno.
4
votes
2answers
122 views

What is the latin phrase for knowing a mistake and doing it anyway

I am trying to remember a latin quote that says something like "I know I am wrong but I do it anyway." I remember reading it in a book. It's not much to go on, but if someone knows it, it ...
6
votes
1answer
106 views

Nepos' Themistocles: ut ingratis omnes ad depugnandum cogerentur?

I am reading the biography of Themistocles by Cornelius Nepos. He recounts the story of how Themistocles used a deceit to bring about the naval engagement that went down in history as the famous ...
5
votes
1answer
175 views

Ethics of Spinoza - est ut

Spinoza, Ethics, De Deo, Propositio 33, Scholium 2: Quare non est ut in hoc absurdo refutando tempus consumam. William White translates it: Therefore it is not worthwhile that I should waste time ...
3
votes
1answer
106 views

When you finish “lingua latina per se illustrata” can you understand latin books easily?

As It is said in title, when you finish "lingua latina per se illustrata" by Hans H. Ørberg How much can you understand a latin manuscript? Or should one follow some other books after it?
1
vote
0answers
29 views

Incorrect Google translations of Thumb and Fingers in Latin - request for “correct” answers [duplicate]

I have a little familiarity with Latin, but Google Translate contradicts my expectations. thumb <---> abductor pollicis first finger <---> flexor hallucis second finger <---> digitus ...
3
votes
2answers
118 views

6 types of person in verb or 3?

People always say that there 6 types of person in the conjugation of a verb: I he, she, it you (single) we you (plural) they Somehow there is another group of people say that there are only 3 ...
4
votes
1answer
87 views

Translation of a passage

In a book that I'm reading, a passage form Johann Gottlieb Heineccius is referred to illustrate the difference between codicilli and epistolae (the last paragraph [starting: "unde recte"] is ...
-3
votes
1answer
95 views

Help with a translation into Classical Latin [closed]

How would I say the phrase "Retaliate with Success" in classical Latin?
13
votes
2answers
6k views

Feminine case 3rd-person version of “Veni, vidi, vici”

How does the famous saying: Veni, vidi, vici. have to be changed so that it describes a female person, such as in English: She came, she saw, she conquered. Reversing Google Translate gives ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

Pronunciation of genitive proper-name epithets, e.g. Euonymus fortunei

What customs do the various Latin pronunciations have for pronouncing species epithets that are the genitive form of someone's name, e.g. Euonymus fortunei, named for Robert Fortune? In the English ...
3
votes
0answers
54 views

If we say worship is only for God which latin word should we use for worship?

Latria is defined as that worship which is due only to God, unlike other forms of veneration (such as to the Virgin Mary or Saints) which is called Dulia and Hyperdulia. All three, I think, are forms ...

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