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Is expiari an alternate form of the infinitive expiare?

I take the following sentence from Fabules Faciles: ...hōc enim ūnō modō tantum scelus expiārī potuit as "...only in this way could he atone for such a great crime." literally, "...
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0answers
43 views

Determining the difference between ambiguous nouns and verb forms without macrons

Salvete omnes, As I've mentioned a couple times on here, I am working on adding macrons to a specific text, I can't really use an auto-macronizer (nor will I, or do I want to). But there is a bit of a ...
7
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0answers
55 views

edere panem vs. comedere panem

Consider the following minimal pair: edere panem 'to eat (the) bread' comedere panem 'to eat up the bread' When a resultative prefix is present (e.g. com- in comedere), panem is necessarily understood ...
4
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2answers
89 views

Why would adhuc be used at the beginning of a situation?

My knowledge of adhuc is that it is typically used in the context of some continuing action. For example, in the story of Perseus, it reads: [Acrisius] autem ubi Perseum vīdit, magnō terrōre affectus ...
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2answers
103 views

Translating Gollum's “Go away and never come back!”

One of the more memorable scenes in the Lord of the Ring's movies is the moment when Gollum's two personalities argue with each other, and finally one of his selves orders the other, "Go away and ...
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1answer
57 views

Translation of US Army motto “This We'll Defend”

I am looking for a good translation of the US army motto, which is: This We'll Defend There are three variants of translation I have found: 1 Haec protegimus 2 Is nos mos vallo 3 Hoc defendam ...
5
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2answers
150 views

How to write “I saw this and thought of you” in latin?

I'm wanting to write "I saw this and though of you" in latin, and am struggling with the "of you" section (I'm only a beginner)... Should this be "de +abl" or is there ...
1
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1answer
47 views

“I will become rich even if it kills you” in Latin

tuae divitiae mea usque ad mortem? I'm looking for something pithy suitable for heraldry, but I fear Google Translate introduces ambiguity - I'm not looking to die, myself; but if it makes me rich, I'...
4
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1answer
196 views

reference for the greek verb αγγελιαφορέω

Liddell-Scott Greek-English Lexicon mentions that the verb αγγελιαφορέω (bear messages) is found in "Sch.A.Pr. 969", that is, "Scholia in Aeschylus' Prometheus". So I would like to ...
2
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2answers
108 views

“Who washes the washer” in Latin

The machine that washes my clothes has somehow itself become unclean. How to clean it is a question for some other forum, but I am reminded of the saying "Quis custodiet ipsos custodes". ...
6
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1answer
112 views

Hidden from/by you

I answered a question a moment ago and I contemplated phrasing "hidden from you" as a te absconditum. But then I realized that the pronoun could also be taken as an agent, rendering it "...
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“Everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about.” in Latin

What would be the proper Latin translation of: Everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about. The author of the quote is uncertain and, as far as I can see, it is not a proverb or a ...
3
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1answer
172 views

Translate “This too shall pass”

I was trying to translate this famous motto. Is the following correct? Hoc quoque effluet. Do you think of a better translation? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/This_too_shall_pass
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1answer
44 views

I thought of “we are greater within” as a nice phrase that might be cool in Latin

Thus far, I have researched Latin lightly and have passively watched multiple Latin videos. I would say I could probably figure out how to write a sentence in Latin given enough time with Numen and ...
3
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1answer
64 views

Can afficio be used to mean “approach?”

In English, we can say "I made towards the abandoned building" which means the same thing as "I approach the abandoned building." I'm guessing it may be possible, via a ...
6
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1answer
79 views

Variation between syllabic and non-syllabic V: in what contexts is it possible?

Allen's Vox Latina, 2nd edition (1988) metions that there is occasional "poetic interchange" in Latin of syllabic [u] and non-syllabic [w], mentioning trisyllabic silua and disyllabic genva ...
7
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2answers
697 views

J in ancients inscriptions

Is the letter J used in ancient Roman inscriptions of (roughly) the classical era? If yes, in what kinds of contexts? I am under the impression that using I for vowels and J for consonants is a ...
3
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1answer
113 views

Closest equivalent of “Don't get mad, get even” in Latin

I am looking for the closest equivalents of the following phrase in Latin: Don't get mad, get even. Preferably not a word-by-word translation, but an 'established' phrase or proverb.
2
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1answer
52 views

Translation of “Quasi non sit veritate”

Quasi non sit veritate. Searched and could not find anything. Thanks in advance to those that can help translating. This is from a “Tactical” training company.
3
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1answer
72 views

Translate “Rise above yourself” into Latin

I would like to ask you for help with double-checking the translation of "Rise above yourself", as in "surpass your own self". In feminine form would this be Supergreditur ipsum? ...
6
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1answer
318 views

Is U between NG and a vowel always a consonant?

Is the letter U (whether spelled as U or V) between NG and a vowel always a consonant? It is at the very least a useful rule of thumb, but I wonder if there are counterexamples to this rule (or ...
5
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1answer
427 views

Is it plausible that the word “bellua”(beast) derived from “bellum”(war)? (or vice versa)

I saw Luis Vives made the claim that "bellum" is derived from "bellua": Truly fighting belongs neither to good men nor to thieves, nor to any that are men at all, but is a right ...
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1answer
100 views

Encoding abbreviated 'quod' in Unicode

This example comes from a 16th century treatise printed in Poland. It's known from a published transcription that it means 'quod'. The question is what is the last character of the abbreviation. On ...
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2answers
65 views

New Life - Latin translation

I’m looking for farm name ideas and am stuck on the concept of it being a “new life”... celebrating a changing of life’s season, etc. All I can find really is the general translation, I’m not sure how ...
4
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1answer
100 views

Strange spelling of final m

In a 16th century Latin treatise published in Poland several occurences of the final m have the form of ꝫ (in Unicode U+A76B LATIN SMALL LETTER ET). You can find more information about the work at ...
9
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1answer
159 views

Genitive Adjective with no Noun Referent

Praejudicium autem cum dico, non volo intelligi qualecunque praegressum judicium in animo; quasi animus ab omni omnino judicio liber esse debeat: sed judicium quod semel formatum tanti fit, ut eo quis ...
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1answer
231 views

Unlike “videtur mihi”, can “mihi placet” stand alone?

In Q: Is it "bene videtur" or "bonum videtur"? Adjective or adverb with verbs/copulae meaning "seem", I made the mistake of assuming that, "videtur mihi" = &...
7
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2answers
98 views

Is there a word or short phrase that corresponds to “dunk” in English?

It seems like "demergo" and "immergo" may have some close linguistic domains to the English word 'dunk' but I'm not sure. Is there a Latin word which would work equally well for ...
6
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1answer
92 views

What is the etymology of 'cuius' and is it different from 'quis'?

'cuius' (and 'cui') is an interesting word in that it stands out as different from the other terms in the declension of 'quis'. It seems to be pronounced differently. 'quis' is /kwis/ but 'cuius' is /...
6
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2answers
592 views

How do I best translate “A big window into history”?

As I've only recently begun to study Latin, I'm not yet sure how to best translate "A big window into history". First of all, I'm not sure whether the adjective should precede, or rather ...
9
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1answer
96 views

Did poets elide across consonants?

I have a definite recollection that Plautus, Ennius, or some other early poet had a tendency to elide across a word-final S, as in (made-up examples) domus et → dom'et and domus est → domu'st. If ...
5
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1answer
214 views

Transcription of 3 latin lines in Dutch medieval manuscript

Hi Latin Stackexchange for my masters thesis I am transcribing a 16th century Dutch manuscript about alchemy. On folio 172r there are some Latin words and a Latin sentence. Can someone help me ...
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2answers
245 views

On the syntax of 'Cogitate quantis laboribus fundatum imperium (…) una nox paene delerit' (Cic. Cat. 4, 19)

Picking up the thread of analyzing beautiful structures involving participles in Cicero's works (e.g. see this link), I'd like to raise a question about the syntax of the following complex sentence. ...
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2answers
55 views

Translating “beautiful things exist to be understood”

I'm trying to translate the sentence "Beautiful things exist to be understood." I believe "Res pulchrae intellegendus sunt" is quite close, but I think the sentence would sound ...
7
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1answer
290 views

Origin of “animabus illis”

In the offertory of the requiem mass there occurs the phrase "tu suscipe pro animabus illis quarum hodie memoriam facimus". I understand that *animabus is used instead of animis, because the ...
7
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1answer
72 views

Does Greek accent ever affect Latin stress?

Latin borrowed a number of words, including names, from Greek. Are there any instances where the stress in Latin is not where expected but follows the Greek accent instead? My impression was always ...
1
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1answer
23 views

Pliny, Naturalis Historia Bk II, first para., “conplexus”

Pliny, Naturalis Historia Book II, paragraph I: Mundum et hoc—quocumque nomine alio caelum appellare libuit cuius circumflexu teguntur cuncta, numen esse credi par est, aeternum, inmensum, neque ...
3
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1answer
96 views

LLPSI does not load on Google Play Books in web browsers

I recently purchased LLPSI on Google Play Books; I already own it as a kindle book, but Google had a bundle that included Pars II and a companion book. Unfortunately, I can't get it to load in Safari, ...
3
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2answers
509 views

Ancient Greek Romans 1:27 - I don't understand this phrase through a straight translation into English

https://studybible.info/interlinear/Romans%201:27 The part I am curious about is the last phrase: "[indecency manufacturing] and [the compensation which was a necessity of their delusion in ...
14
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2answers
2k views

What does the “Roman” numeral Ɔ represent?

It's conceivable that the numeral Ɔ and letters it combines with are a mediaeval conceit rather than truly Roman — hopefully this is still on topic. I'm trying to decipher the publication date of a ...
3
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1answer
39 views

Stress of presbyterum, presbytero

Salvete, Where is the stress in the various forms of presbyter? Would I be correct with the following? (I have placed the apostrophe before the stressed syllable.) Gratias vobis ago Paulus nom. '...
5
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2answers
189 views

How to translate “the great mistress/ruleress of the world/worlds” in Latin?

I'm trying to translate both phrases "the great (female) ruler of the WORLD" and "the great (female) ruler of the WORLDS" in to Latin. So, the latter phrase is otherwise the same ...
3
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1answer
105 views

What is the difference between etiam and enim?

In Latin etiam and enim seem to have pretty similar meanings. I notice that both Greek and Latin seem to use connective words like this a lot, I suppose because they had no punctuation, so they serve ...
6
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1answer
105 views

How does Latin handle “picture nouns”?

"Picture nouns" are nouns like that have their own content such as, picture, story. In English this characteristics results in ambiguity. When we say "my photo" it may mean: A ...
4
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1answer
63 views

What is the most modern calculus book in Latin?

I wonder if there is any modern math books especially calculus that is written in Latin like multivariable calculus, vector calculus etc. Not knowing how modern the get, I'd like to know: What is the ...
5
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2answers
296 views

“videtur quod” = “it seems that” or “it is seen that”?

I thought "videtur quod" meant "it seems that", but I've seen it also translated as "it is seen that". "To seem" ≠ "to be seen" (the latter being a ...
5
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3answers
2k views

Extra Meaningful way of saying “I love my children, who are no longer with me”

Not being able to speak Latin I really cannot find a way to say this that I think is satisfactory. (I don't want a Google translate saying that has such personal meaning) I would like to portray this ...
3
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1answer
157 views

“Gaza tamen aliquoties occiput vertit”

In a footnote of Vives' Dialogs (for the word "Ad brechma"): Ad Brechma, brechma, tis; sive bregma, pars anterior capitis, synciput a Breco Graeco, quod est pluo, et irrigo; haec enim pars ...
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1answer
60 views

In the phrase Omnimoda potestate Antistes, should any of the words be capitalized?

In the phrase omnimoda potestate antistes, should any words be capitalized? And how would it be translated? It is in reference to a 16th century bishop who considered himself, omnimoda potestate ...
4
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1answer
82 views

'From a dream' = Ex somnium / somnus?

(I've never posted on StackExchange before so sorry if I'm missing any tags etc.) I'm currently tasked with some creative writing tasks and have been asked to title a work dealing with nightmares (...

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