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3
votes
0answers
45 views

Are any phonemic distinctions not represented in Latin?

Latin orthography seems to have been relatively phonemic. In other words, if long vowels are marked somehow (macrons or apices), there seems to be a straightforward mapping between letters and ...
1
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0answers
52 views

What is the meaning of “cin” in the phrases “petras omnes cin cum…”?

So I've been trying to figure out the Latin lyircs in "Hellfire" from the video game Final Fantasy XV. It's really hard to make out what they're saying, and the only part that I've managed ...
3
votes
1answer
117 views

Latin influences in Spanish

Spanish has a lot of influences from Latin. One of them is the -ar, -er, and -ir verbs. Accordding to http://spanishlinguist.us/2013/10/the-origins-of-spanish-ar-er-and-ir-verbs: ""Latin’s -...
5
votes
4answers
234 views

Does D/L variation go back to a dl cluster?

As outlined here in “Indo-European *d, *l and *dl” by Tim Pulju, there’s a hypothesis going back to Hamp 1972 that the l in Latin lacrima and d in the archaic variant dacruma both represent a dl ...
3
votes
1answer
48 views

A list of common different spelling-variants

The beginner (like me) might occasionally find a word he is not familiar with. It is usually easy to retrieve the base-form (nom. or stem for a verb) and find it in a dictionary. Even more, there are ...
6
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0answers
56 views

What was the use and frequency of use of Latin “mactāre”?

In What are the key differences between the main Latin verbs meaning "to kill"? we saw a lot of verbs meaning "to kill" and the differences between them. The fun part of it is that ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

Are concubine and concupiscence ultimately related?

Phonetically and semantically, it seemed clear to me that concubine and concupiscence should share a root; however, Wiktionary (1, 2) and Etymonline (3, 4) both point to different Latin roots. ...
3
votes
1answer
113 views

“Once upon a time”

The English phrase "once upon a time" at the beginning of a story immediately sets the genre and style to a great extent. Is there a similar device, possibly a phrase, in Latin? It does not ...
3
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1answer
106 views

Translation of a Latin verse in a book on the history of mathematics

A latin poem by Friedrich Leo appears in a book I have read for some time, and the author cited a part of it(the complete version can be seen here) when he was talking about Hamilton Unde ...
4
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1answer
81 views

Translation of the phrase “You exist, thus I believe”

What is Latin for “You exist, thus I believe”? Please state which dictionary you have used (if you have used any).
1
vote
1answer
109 views

Can *esse* be elided with a dative of possession?

The possessive dative construction involves a subject possessee, a dative possessor, and a form of esse: Mihi soror est. Dicit sibi sororem esse. In this construction, is esse ever elided? That is, ...
7
votes
3answers
531 views

Vowel shortening before another vowel: Exceptions

I am rather ashamed to admit that I used to pronounce Alexandrea (or Alexandria, cf. Ἀλεξάνδρεια) incorrectly in Latin, that is I mistakenly applied the famous rule "vocalis ante vocalem ...
9
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2answers
297 views

“Interdum sane, qui cogitare se dicit nondum constitutum sibi certi quidquam fatetur”

In the Thesaurus of Iohannes Matthias Gesnerus under cogito: (clearer link) inter cogitare et deliberare hoc interest, cogitare est dubitare, deliberare, confirmare. Haec Nonius 5,28. Interdum sane, ...
2
votes
1answer
41 views

Preposition of agent

Is it better to say a lectica portatur or in lectica portatur if it's the lectīcā who is the agent? Gratias plurimas.
6
votes
1answer
86 views

Difference between 'urbe' and 'oppidum'?

I have found that LLPSI uses oppidum to describe cities (at least in the early chapters) while Duolingo uses urbe. What is the difference, and which should I usually use?
5
votes
0answers
35 views

Female Names and Heritable *Cognomina*

Suppose I want to speak of the daughter of a man with a heritable cognonmen. Let us take Marcus Tullius Cicero as an example. If I want to clarify that the Tullia I am speaking of is his daughter (...
3
votes
1answer
148 views

Impersonal Verbs: Are Active Transitives Possible?

Latin utilizes some verbs that pretty much only occur impersonally, like oportet. One can also regularly form impersonal actives from intransitive verbs like placeo and impersonal passives from ...
1
vote
1answer
36 views

Translating “may turn into this”

I need some help to translate a phrase: That which was fabric/woven, may turn/become/transform into this My partner gave me some time ago, a handmade bracelet made from fabric, symbolising our ...
3
votes
1answer
121 views

Translation of the title of a 17th century map of underground waterways

A picture by the 17th century Jesuit scholar Athanasius Kircher, explaining his theory of underground waterways connecting all bodies of water on Earth, is titled: Systema ideale quo exprimitur, ...
6
votes
1answer
750 views

Distinguishing house from home

The common word domus can mean both "house" and "home". How can I make a distinction between a house and a home in Latin? For example, I might buy a house but it doesn't feel like ...
6
votes
0answers
74 views

Why is *salāta feminine?

OED traces the "salad" family of words (Portuguese salada, Fra. salate, Spa. ensalada, Ita. insalata etc.) to spoken Latin *salāta, from the verb salāre. One notices that salāta as well as ...
6
votes
4answers
2k views

A personal name ending in -ua: is it male or female?

We have the name of a Romano-British Potter from the 2nd century A.D. whose name is SECVNDVA. Is this a male or a female name?
5
votes
1answer
76 views

Why is the Chapel in the Tower of London St Peter AD Vincula, not St Peter in Vinculis?

Why is the Chapel in the Tower of London "St Peter ad Vincula" and not "St Peter in Vinculis"
8
votes
2answers
444 views

“cenacula dicuntur, ad quae scalis ascenditur” - why passive singular (ascenditur)?

According to Festus (can be found in L&S under cenaculum): cenacula dicuntur, ad quae scalis ascenditur While the overall meaning of the statement is quite clear (namely that the upper room that ...
3
votes
1answer
57 views

Translating a text about “responsions moldavice”, 1524

I try to translate the following text: 1524, "Acta Tomiciana: epistole, legationes, responsa, actiones, res geste Sigismundi I Regis Poloniae", Volume 7 "Sed cum preterita magis ...
7
votes
1answer
83 views

-whatever suffix

Is there a Latin suffix meaning “-whatever”? E.g.: Wikipedia, Wikisource, … Wikiwhatever. Vicipaedia, Vicifons, … Vici…(?). (But I'm not even sure that -whatever itself is a correct English suffix.)
4
votes
1answer
316 views

Translating a text about Moldavia from 1597

Could someone translate this text from 1597? I am not sure the text is correct, because of the automatic recognition and some manual fixes: Moldavia autem à quibusdam major, Nigra, sive superior ...
3
votes
1answer
107 views

Is this translation for “If I cannot move Heaven, I will raise Hell.” correct?

I want to make sure this is the correct translation for “If I cannot move Heaven, I will raise Hell.” Flectere si nequeo superos, Acheronta noveno.
4
votes
2answers
119 views

What is the latin phrase for knowing a mistake and doing it anyway

I am trying to remember a latin quote that says something like "I know I am wrong but I do it anyway." I remember reading it in a book. It's not much to go on, but if someone knows it, it ...
6
votes
1answer
105 views

Nepos' Themistocles: ut ingratis omnes ad depugnandum cogerentur?

I am reading the biography of Themistocles by Cornelius Nepos. He recounts the story of how Themistocles used a deceit to bring about the naval engagement that went down in history as the famous ...
5
votes
1answer
174 views

Ethics of Spinoza - est ut

Spinoza, Ethics, De Deo, Propositio 33, Scholium 2: Quare non est ut in hoc absurdo refutando tempus consumam. William White translates it: Therefore it is not worthwhile that I should waste time ...
3
votes
1answer
102 views

When you finish “lingua latina per se illustrata” can you understand latin books easily?

As It is said in title, when you finish "lingua latina per se illustrata" by Hans H. Ørberg How much can you understand a latin manuscript? Or should one follow some other books after it?
1
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0answers
29 views

Incorrect Google translations of Thumb and Fingers in Latin - request for “correct” answers [duplicate]

I have a little familiarity with Latin, but Google Translate contradicts my expectations. thumb <---> abductor pollicis first finger <---> flexor hallucis second finger <---> digitus ...
3
votes
2answers
117 views

6 types of person in verb or 3?

People always say that there 6 types of person in the conjugation of a verb: I he, she, it you (single) we you (plural) they Somehow there is another group of people say that there are only 3 ...
4
votes
1answer
87 views

Translation of a passage

In a book that I'm reading, a passage form Johann Gottlieb Heineccius is referred to illustrate the difference between codicilli and epistolae (the last paragraph [starting: "unde recte"] is ...
-3
votes
1answer
94 views

Help with a translation into Classical Latin [closed]

How would I say the phrase "Retaliate with Success" in classical Latin?
13
votes
2answers
6k views

Feminine case 3rd-person version of “Veni, vidi, vici”

How does the famous saying: Veni, vidi, vici. have to be changed so that it describes a female person, such as in English: She came, she saw, she conquered. Reversing Google Translate gives ...
1
vote
1answer
33 views

Pronunciation of genitive proper-name epithets, e.g. Euonymus fortunei

What customs do the various Latin pronunciations have for pronouncing species epithets that are the genitive form of someone's name, e.g. Euonymus fortunei, named for Robert Fortune? In the English ...
3
votes
0answers
54 views

If we say worship is only for God which latin word should we use for worship?

Latria is defined as that worship which is due only to God, unlike other forms of veneration (such as to the Virgin Mary or Saints) which is called Dulia and Hyperdulia. All three, I think, are forms ...
6
votes
2answers
105 views

What is a “rough draft” in Latin?

Suppose I'm preparing a speech for the Senate floor, and I want to make sure it sounds just right before I present it. So I come up with a rough draft, then revise it several times until I'm satisfied ...
2
votes
1answer
71 views

Future infinitive active in indirect discourse

The future infinitive active can be used as an active periphrastic, but within an indirect discourse, of which the subject is an accusative and the main verb an infinitive, can it also have a future ...
2
votes
0answers
129 views

Can 'quod' refer to the previous speaker?

It is quite common to start a Latin sentence with quod, referring to the matter discussed in the previous sentence. In a dialogue, can one use it to refer to the previous thing even if it was uttered ...
8
votes
2answers
576 views

what does the abbreviation “h. l.” (or “h. 1.”) stand for?

In one of the footnotes in Popma's book, we read: Vocabulum hocce in genere neutro h. l. esse positum, testatur Erythraeus in Ind. Virgil. fol. 41. fac. 2. col b. I could not find Erythraeu's book ...
7
votes
1answer
99 views

What are popular fonts for polytonic Greek?

There are quite a lot of fonts available for writing Latin, which have been designed for easy legibility and contain all the letters of the Latin alphabet. For the Greek alphabet, however, most modern ...
4
votes
2answers
70 views

A noun meaning “survivor”

I am looking for a noun meaning "survivor". It looks like the closest in meaning is the adjective superstes. Can that be used as a noun, and if so how do you decline it? Per the post on ...
6
votes
1answer
133 views

What evidence is there for the classical pronunciation of zeta?

As I learned it back in introductory Greek, there's significant debate in the classics community about whether Classical Greek Ζ was pronounced /dz/, /zd/, /zz/, or something else. What evidence is ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

Comparisons in Latin- does this make sense?

Here is my sentence: I'm trying to say that "The gods seemed to favor Romulus because he saw 12 vultures, twice the number of birds that Remus saw." Dii Romulō favere visi sunt quia ille ...
1
vote
2answers
65 views

Does trisyllabic laxing occur in Latin words like 'decision' before entering English?

There's a phenomenon called Trisyllabic laxing where the vowel in a stressed syllable is shortened if two (or more) syllables follow. If the stressed vowel is in at least* the penultimate syllable (...
3
votes
1answer
93 views

Difference between geminus and gemellus

Both geminus and gemellus seem to have similar meanings: twin-born, born together, twins. Is the main difference between these two words how they were used, or did they have additional meanings that ...
3
votes
3answers
110 views

What case does 'plus' take?

I don't have any information about what case to use with 'plus' (or 'magis'). In dictionaries usually only prepositions take some case, and it is showed in parentheses. In my language, 'more' takes ...

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