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3
votes
1answer
36 views

Renaissance Latin translation problem

I'm helping translate some Renaissance Latin (Lawrence of Brindisi) and have come across a passage that I think I understand, but I want to double-check. Hic autem dicitur: Caro mea uere est cibus, ...
5
votes
1answer
158 views

Could “advenis quom desideras” mean “arrive (or come) when you want”?

Advenis quom desideras Having 2 verbs, does it make sense?
5
votes
0answers
46 views

Accusative case marking of subjects in infinitival clauses

The present question is based on a previous discussion with Draconis and on a previous question raised by Joonas. The Accusativus cum Infinitivo (AcI) construction is often regarded in linguistics as ...
6
votes
1answer
493 views

What does “iudices” mean in “consul consulem iudices,” from Cicero?

In "Pro Murena 90" Cicero says: "...consul consulem iudices," "...I, the Consul, recommend him to you as Consul," (Perseus). In the Word-Study tool (Perseus) "...
5
votes
1answer
235 views

Does vowel quantity ever change in the root of a word during conjugation?

I have built a database of Latin words but am having a few problems. I have two databases, one is from Python's CLTK, the other is from online-latin-dictionary.com (OLD). The Python database is ...
9
votes
2answers
513 views

Confusion regarding 'esse' + accusative

I am currently learning Latin from the Bloomsbury Latin to GCSE books. In one of the reading passages the following constructions are used: "non cupio rex vester esse. dei signum mittent si me ...
7
votes
1answer
173 views

How to say the equivalent of “to talk” or “to speak a language”?

I was wondering how one would say the equivalent of "to talk" or "to speak"? Google seems to think it is "Dicere", though other sources seem to differ For contextual ...
1
vote
0answers
44 views

From “Coup de Grace” to “Coup d' Etat”

The French expression, "coup d'etat" = "a blow of state", the (usually violent) overthrow of a government and its replacement by an illegal alternative. In Latin there are a number ...
3
votes
1answer
81 views

Inconsistent use of short and long vowel signs

To my knowledge every vowel is either long, short or belongs to a diphthong, there are no vowels which are medium in length. If a vowel belongs to a diphthong, it seems that modern writers will mark ...
9
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1answer
2k views

Help me understand this Latin “Dad Joke”

The Paideia Institute's In Medias Res magazine recently published a compilation of “Thirteen Dad Jokes from Ancient Rome.” Dad jokes are apparently supposed to be particularly cheesy jokes and puns (...
5
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2answers
1k views

How do you say “my love” in Latin?

I've returned to the novel I mentioned in an earlier question. It takes place in Europe in the 1560's. I was thinking that my main character--who always spoke Latin in school and at college--might ...
7
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0answers
71 views

Accusativus cum Praedicativo

I've been reading The Early Latin Verb by Wolfgang David Cirilo de Melo, where in a footnote he writes: Synchronically, the participle here is best analysed as an elliptical perfect passive ...
4
votes
1answer
95 views

How can I define a new word in Latin?

As Latin is an ancient language, many words denoting new meanings are not available. So, I think it's necessary to define some new words in Latin. For example, principissa (a New Latin word, just ...
4
votes
1answer
101 views

If a demonstrative is not modifying a noun, is it called a demonstrative pronoun?

I was confused on this since aren't demonstrative adjectives phrases like , "this fast" or "this large". If they are, then demonstrative adjectives not necessarily modifying nouns ...
5
votes
1answer
206 views

Latin Proverb Translation

How would I translate this Latin proverb: "Qui se instar ovis gerit hunc lupi vorant." Here's what I have: "Those who devour themselves like a sheep carries this man of a wolf."
5
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0answers
65 views

On the Etymology of the Future Active Infinitive

In Syntax of Plautus, W. M. Lindsay writes: But the earliest form of the Future Infinitive Active, which still survives in some lines of Plautus and has probably been removed by scribes from more, ...
6
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2answers
182 views

Is there a Latin construction for a tentative question/suggestion analogous to “I wonder [question word]”?

At first, I thought "me rogo," but the dictionary did not confirm my suggestion. I think my German is interfering ("ich frage mich").
3
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0answers
100 views

What is “Ripa autem erat munita acutis sudibus sub aqua fixis ut sudes flumine tegerentur” in English?

Right now, I have: Ripa autem erat munita acutis sudibus sub aqua fixis ut sudes flumine tegerentur But he had been protecting a sharp spear underwater" I don't know how to do the rest.
7
votes
3answers
803 views

Is “victurus” a future participle of “vivo” and “vinco”?

I find this hard to believe, but these pages regarding vivo and vinco confirm this to be the case. This also seems to be confirmed on this website. I cannot link directly to the words vivo and vinco, ...
7
votes
4answers
1k views

Passive form of “One can not know”

This is an exercise in a book: We are asked to translate "one" using the passive voice for several sentences. Unfortunately, the exercise is not corrected. One of those sentences is "...
9
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0answers
84 views

Construction with ecce

According to the usual authorities the particle ecce is construed with the accusative in pre-classical Latin, but with the nominative in classical and post-classical Latin. Thus, Lewis and Short: “(...
7
votes
1answer
228 views

Meaning of the first line of Cicero's De Oratore

The very first line of Cicero's De Oratore reads as follows Cogitanti mihi saepenumero et memoria vetera repetenti perbeati fuisse, Quinte Frater, illi videri solent, qui in optima re publica, cum et ...
3
votes
0answers
75 views

Book for exercises

do you know any book for the exercises in Latin. I'm looking for something similar to Hans Orbergs' exercitia book. If you know any, please let me know.
3
votes
2answers
128 views

What is a word for “conception of truth”?

Is there a Latin word for "conception of truth" or "notion of truth" or a hybrid Graeco-Latin word for it? If not can such a word be termed or constructed for it? Or a phrase? How ...
9
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2answers
2k views

How do you say “in the year of the plague” in Latin?

We're putting up a large sundial, which already has a suitable latin motto, but given COVID, under the date would like to add a small submotto with the phase "in the year of the plague". ...
4
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0answers
65 views

Badly translated species names [closed]

I was considering that the people who name species are most likely scientist and not latin scholars. I wonder if this means there are poorly translated species name. If so, I'd love to hear some ...
3
votes
2answers
176 views

How do you translate “deeds, not words” into Latin?

I am looking to translate the phrase "deeds not words" into Latin. This is for a tattoo. I tried looking at Google Translate and it tells me either facta non verba or acta non verba. I need ...
7
votes
2answers
1k views

How do you say “How is the weather”?

Not a common saying in Classical Latin literature I imagine, but maybe could be found in letters? Or, if there are any equivalent phrases or expressions found in Neo-Latin particularly, eg Erasmus, ...
5
votes
2answers
567 views

How would you translate “a day off”, or “a day without work”?

Today is the weekend. Weekend has been attempted here already. “Holiday” or “holidays” is also easy enough (dies feriae). But what if I want to say “today is a day off work” or a “a day without work”?
3
votes
1answer
60 views

How to you convert a Latin word, such as voluntas, into a name, specifically a surname?

I've been wondering how to properly convert Latin words into names to signify the importance of certain concepts to a person, and met conflicting information online. My default assumption would be to ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

How do you say “anyway” in Latin?

Using ‘anyway’ to indicate that the previous matter was an aside, or it doesn’t affect the conclusion, for instance, to say: “It was wet and nobody was at the park. Anyway, I went home.”
4
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0answers
148 views

Fearing the Evolution of Coronavirus

As governments dread the evolution of a Coronavirus-variant that will not be susceptible to the new wave of vaccines, how would this fear be expressed in Latin? The Romans, with no concept of ...
4
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0answers
56 views

Is the Italian town Empoli from Greek ἐμπολή, “merchandise?”

Is the italian town-name "Empoli" related to the greek word "ἐμπολή", meaning merchandise, or gain from merchandise? I met "εμπολή" in the form of "ἐξεμπολημένων&...
5
votes
1answer
349 views

Did Plato describe man as “a being in search of meaning”?

I happened upon this Quora question, in which the quote "man, a being in search of meaning" is ascribed to Plato. Did Plato write this and if so, where? Obviously there are other Platonic ...
9
votes
4answers
2k views

How do you say “ Coup de grâce ” in latin?

After searching for vocabs and etymologies in wiktionary I translated it only myself and I've got " gratiae colaphus " Is it correct? Or should I use "misericordiae" for "...
8
votes
1answer
331 views

Why does Müller read “accusatius” in Satyrica 119.11?

Petronius' Satyrica 119.11-12, in Konrad Müller's Teubner edition (1995), reads: hinc Numidae †accusatius†, illinc nova vellera Seres, atque Arabum populus sua despoliaverat arva. What reasons could ...
3
votes
1answer
56 views

How would you write “through our love to the stars”?

Similar to through hardship to the stars or “per aspera ad astra” as many of you already know, how would you write this? New to this site, thanks!
6
votes
2answers
206 views

Where can I find large public domain texts in latin?

I need to have a large selection of free, publicly available texts in Latin on the internet, hoping to train an neural network (computer algorithm) on it. It would eventually be able to generate ...
4
votes
1answer
195 views

Is μῆνις cognate with mania?

Pharr (Homeric Greek: a book for beginners, 4th ed.) has on pp. 10 and 281 a statement that μῆνις in Homer would have had an α in most dialects and says that it's cognate with maniac and maniacal. But ...
1
vote
1answer
90 views

How to say “dudes rock” in Latin?

I want to translate "dudes rock" into Latin. Google Translate and working with synonyms got me to viri sunt prodigiosus (“men are amazing” more or less?). But I'm wondering if there’s an ...
8
votes
2answers
863 views

Ave for plural addressee?

I have been told that the greeting ave or have is of Punic origin and not an imperative of avere. If so, how do I use this word to greet several people? Is it in the same form, is it pluralized to (h)...
6
votes
1answer
168 views

Translating “a forest's son” to Latin

everyone. I'm trying to translate the phrase "a forest's son" from song lyrics into Latin. I would like to say "son of the forest." My background is a little bit of Ecclesiastical ...
3
votes
1answer
57 views

How to express singing a song rather than singing about something

If I'm understanding correctly, άείδω is used with the accusative, and it means to sing about something. In English the object of the verb would be the song, not the thing being sung about. In Greek ...
6
votes
4answers
283 views

What monolingual text editions are available?

I am a beginner and making quite good progress with Ovid. Rete utile est. To start with Ovid I bought the Loeb edition of Metamorphoses, Books 1 to 8. But I anticipate that when I have finished this ...
8
votes
2answers
316 views

Are the present and future imperative used together?

Both the usual present imperative (e.g. fac) and the future imperative (e.g. facito) are attested. But are they ever used together so that the tenses are contrasted? In terms of a concrete example, ...
6
votes
1answer
685 views

How to say “to woo” in Latin?

How does one say "to woo" or "to court" (i.e., to solicit someone for marriage) in Latin?
10
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1answer
309 views

Why is nominative instead of ablative absolute used in 'Ibi egressi Trojani'?

In LLPSI 2 'Roma Æterna', Chapter XLI 'Origines', it is written: Ibi [Siciliâ] egressi Trojani, quibus ab immenso prope errore nihil præter arma et naves supererat, cum prædam ex agris agerent, ...
4
votes
0answers
88 views

How to say “no one is worth to be believed (to) easily” with dignus+ supine?

The u-supine can connect with dignus like: Nihil dignum dictu actum his consulibus (Livy; nothing worth saying/of mentioning was done ..) But when I tried to use this pattern to say: "No one is ...
6
votes
1answer
115 views

What does “qua” mean in: “dedi mille argenteos, qua tu tui pudoris defensione apud omnes et tuos utaris et alienos.”

In Gen. 20:16 Sebastian Sastellio: Deinde Saram alloquens [Abimelechus]: Fratri tuo (inquit), dedi mille argenteos, qua tu tui pudoris defensione apud omnes et tuos utaris et alienos. I don't ...
8
votes
2answers
333 views

Practice passages for Latin SAT?

I'm helping a student prepare for the SAT Latin subject test, which includes a short reading passage followed by multiple-choice questions. It would be useful to have a few sample passages that we can ...

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