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How would you best translate "tis but a flesh wound" to Latin

So it's a "Monty Python" line by the Black Knight as he gets his arms and legs hacked off and in ridiculous defiance as a response shouts "it is just a flesh wound" as in it was ...
Saul's user avatar
  • 193
1 vote
0 answers
26 views

Help drafting a question about correct phrasing and grammar regarding English to Latin translation of a slogan or meaningful sentence

Oxford House is a company that has recovery houses for alcoholics and addicts all over the nation. I live in an Oxford House and I'm doing some fundraising for our group by selling T-shirts. A design ...
Jim Mcmellen's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
71 views

Estne in lingua Latina verbum quod significat abire ex schola sine finiendo, ut Anglica phrasa "drop out" vel Croaticum verbum "ispisati"?

Estne in lingua Latina verbum quod significat abire ex schola sine finiendo, ut Anglica phrasa "drop out" (cessare-prehendere foras) vel Croaticum verbum "is-pisati" (ex-scribere)? ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
60 views

Estne in lingua Latina verbum quod significat incipere in scholam ire, ut Anglicum verbum "enroll" vel Croaticum verbum "upisati"?

Estne in lingua Latina verbum quod significat incipere in scholam ire, ut Anglicum verbum "en-roll" (in-volvere) vel Croaticum verbum "u-pisati" (in-scribere)?
FlatAssembler's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
111 views

Locating One of Martial's Epigrams

Having found a snippet of one of Martial's Epigrams: "You dine so well, it's clear that you are rich, yet you don't pay your debts, which is a bitch,". Amused and intrigued I tried to ...
tony's user avatar
  • 8,872
6 votes
1 answer
511 views

How did the contracted perfect passive work?

I was shocked when I saw the word "latest" in a Latin book. The book's English translation implies it is related to "latus." The next word "alteque" would have suggested ...
Daniel T's user avatar
  • 303
3 votes
3 answers
83 views

“Die Daily” or “die every day”

What is the best translation for “die daily” or “die every day” “Die” as in: remember to suffer daily (like Jesus says “pick up your cross and follow me”
Diego's user avatar
  • 31
1 vote
0 answers
51 views

What are some idioms where subtle differences in phrasing lead to a big difference in meaning?

I've seen a meme going around recently: In 1000 years people won't understand the difference between "butt dial" and "booty call" and THAT is why the Bible can't be a reliable ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 68.1k
8 votes
1 answer
213 views

How were those shrine niches originally called?

A recent excavation in Pompeii revealed a rather rare blue (caeruleum?) shrine. In this there are 3 niches of red color. How those are called in Latin? (Image taken from here - pompeiisites.org)
d_e's user avatar
  • 11.2k
2 votes
1 answer
25 views

Translation help with motto

I have already tried Google translate and want to make sure it is accurate. I am looking for the translation for either “the Hunters of hunters” or “we hunt the hunters” Thank you
John Long's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
234 views

How to scan "ac veluti magno in populo ..."?

In Virgil's Aeneid there is the following line: ac veluti magno in populo cum saepe coorta est and I am trying to figure out how to scan it. The first thing is that I thought the "a" in ac ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
  • 7,077
1 vote
0 answers
65 views

Dowling versus Rote

Ranieri-Dowling Method Versus the Rote Method of Learning. Are these two methods of pedagogy dissimilar? They appear to be similar from a basis overview of each approach. I’m trying to determine the ...
Zachary Dagan's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
336 views

Can someone explain this unexpected construction?

I'm reading Ανάβασις by Ξενοφών. I came across this sentence: ἐν δὲ τούτῳ ἧκε Τισσαφέρνης ἔχων τὴν ἑαυτοῦ δύναμιν ὡς εἰς οἶκον ἀπιὼν καὶ Ὀρόντας τὴν ἑαυτοῦ δύναμιν: ἦγε δὲ καὶ τὴν θυγατέρα τὴν ...
mike rodent's user avatar
  • 1,153
8 votes
1 answer
370 views

Saint Augustine letter to Nebridio

In one of Saint Augustine's letters, numbered Carta 10 [CSEL 34/1,22 ] (PL 33,73) in "Obras Completas de San Agustin VIII – Cartas (1.º) 1-123", we see the phrase: Mittaturne ad te ...
Elederete's user avatar
  • 183
1 vote
0 answers
63 views

What are the meaning and function of -ne in superne and pone?

What are the meaning and function of -ne in superne and pone? Oxford Latin Dictionary seems to say that the senses of -ne is related to making questions, and it is hard for me to relate its senses ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
2 answers
107 views

What is the full word of clitic -ce?

Oxford Latin Dictionary says -ce particle. Deictic particle, usu. enclitic (cf, Osc. iuc, nom. sg, f. = ea); added to demonstratives and in classical L, reduced to -c (hic, iliic; hinc, ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 1
-2 votes
2 answers
69 views

Was suffix -alis derived from alis or alius? Or are they unrelated?

Oxford Latin Dictionary says: alis see alius. -alis, -ale adjl. suff. Collat. w. -aris, which is used when the base contains an l (but cf. cleacalis, limitalis); formed from nouns (...
Tim's user avatar
  • 1
3 votes
1 answer
518 views

How was damno derived from damnum?

Oxford Latin Dictionary says that damno (tr. condemn) was derived from damnum (n. loss; waning). How is sense "loss, waning" related to and derived from sense "condemn"?
Tim's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
44 views

How would you say "There's no going back." in Latin?

One of the listened-to song in Croatia these days is "Rim Tim Tagi Dim", and its reffrain is "There's no going back.". How would you say that in Latin? My attempt would be "...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
-2 votes
0 answers
51 views

Of which indef. pron is ecquid the neut. sing. acc. form? [closed]

Keller's Learn to Read Latin says on p238 ecquid = neut. sing. acc. of indef. pron, anything Of which indef. pron is ecquid the neut. sing. acc. form? I have searched in Oxford Latin Dictionary, ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 1
5 votes
1 answer
361 views

Why is πλοῦτος sometimes neuter?

I was reading some of the letters of St. Paul recently and noticed that πλοῦτος is sometimes neuter, e.g. Ephesians 1:7: . . . ἐν ᾧ ἔχομεν τὴν ἀπολύτρωσιν διὰ τοῦ αἵματος αὐτοῦ, τὴν ἄφεσιν τῶν ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 41.7k
4 votes
2 answers
111 views

Estne in lingua Latina verbum quod significat vertere quod censes, ut Anglica phrasa "change one's mind" vel Croaticum verbum "predomisliti"?

Estne in lingua Latina verbum quod significat vertere quod censes, ut Anglica phrasa "change one's mind" vel Croaticum verbum "pre-do-misliti" ("trans-ad-cogitare")? ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
6 votes
0 answers
91 views

How is Petrarch using an ... an in this passage?

In Invectiva contra quendam magni status hominem, Petrarch complains that his former friend, who used to be very complimentary of him, has recently been calling him ignorant. Petrarch asked what has ...
Kingshorsey's user avatar
  • 6,931
4 votes
0 answers
74 views

The Kind of Man the World Claims to Admire

In the film Dr. Zhivago (1965) rogue, scoundrel and professional survivor, Victor Komorov meets young, firebrand revolutionary, Pasha Antipov. At the conclusion of the meeting Antipov departs and ...
tony's user avatar
  • 8,872
1 vote
0 answers
59 views

How accurate is this song translation Malum Malum (Bad Apple)?

I saw this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XgF96RRcrP4 of a Latin cover of "Bad Apple!!" (original lyrics in Japanese but has been translated into many languages) and like the song ...
alices_and_bobs's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
36 views

Which verb number does zero take? [duplicate]

(Creating spreadsheets can lead you into unexpected directions.) As many are aware of, the number zero itself, is a fairly recent invention, but words for it of course do and did exist in Latin; ...
Canned Man's user avatar
  • 3,339
0 votes
0 answers
64 views

How would you say "Because a college degree set you apart thirty years ago, that means it still does now." in Latin?

My attempt would be "Quoniam diploma te distinguebat abhinc triginta annos, id significat eam etiamnunc te distinguere.".
FlatAssembler's user avatar
6 votes
0 answers
54 views

imperfect subjunctive expressing pluperfect progressive tense?

We know that occasionally the Latin imperfect indicative is used for what we in English would express as a pluperfect progressive:   Et illis, quod iam diu cupiebant, novandi res occasio data est (...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
  • 16.6k
6 votes
1 answer
225 views

Can the subjunctive alone form a conditional's protasis?

The usual form of a Latin indicative sentence predicated on a condition is "Si V-ind, V-ind." The "Si V-ind" is the protasis and the "V-ind" is the apodosis. There is ...
Daniel T's user avatar
  • 303
3 votes
0 answers
58 views

Clean the house

A friend of mine put a reminder to clean his house before going out, in the inner-facing side of the front door. As a humorous note, he wrote it in Latin, attached to a well-known quote: Memento mori....
Rafael's user avatar
  • 11.5k
1 vote
1 answer
1k views

Latin equivalent of derogatory Italian "frociaggine"

Pope Francis has recently got into some hot water for using the derogatory Italian word frociaggine "faggotry". Seeing as the Vatican has Latin as an official language, this raises the ...
Tristan's user avatar
  • 671
4 votes
1 answer
270 views

How would you ask "Is there a Klingon word for loneliness?" in Latin?

How would you translate the idiom "word for X" in Latin? Would you say "verbum pro X" ("Exsistitne in lingua Klingonica verbum pro solitudine?")? Or would you say "...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
78 views

Onwards and Upwards, or maybe Downwards

Ages ago now, Overly Sarcastic Productions released a video on Dante's Inferno, and in it Red said the iconic line "Onwards and upwards, or maybe downwards" in reference to Dante and Virgil'...
No Name's user avatar
  • 191
0 votes
0 answers
19 views

How to phrase “Sing in your chains like the sea”

I want to use the phrase “Canta in catenis tuis sicut mare” with an intended meaning of “Sing in your chains like the sea”. It is inspired by a line from Dylan Thomas’ Fern Hill. The actual and ...
MacDuff's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
945 views

Best Latin translation of "Onwards and Upwards"

Please help me get the most accurate Latin for "Onwards and Upwards"? I've searched the site and couldn't find this. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Jamie Slattery's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
65 views

How much did Latin change from the 3rd to the 5th century AD?

I’m self-studying Latin with the goal Of reading the Vulgate fluently (and because I love languages). I’ve read that the Vulgate was translated in the late 4th and early 5th centuries AD, but most of ...
bob's user avatar
  • 151
2 votes
0 answers
86 views

quid vs. quod difference [closed]

as far as I understand, quid is an interrogative pronoun but seemingly both quid (/quis) and quod (/quí) are relative pronouns. Do I understand that right? Why do I find so many examples of "quid&...
CasualTea's user avatar
  • 101
3 votes
1 answer
87 views

Is "Ita an non" a valid, neutral, straightfoward translation of "Yes or no"?

Asking to really, really be sure since I'm planning on getting it tattoed. I just intend that simple sentence in the more correctly latin way possible, but there are many ways to say it and I don't ...
Mone's user avatar
  • 31
2 votes
1 answer
83 views

How would you translate "blood for blood" into Latin?

How would you translate "blood for blood" into Latin? This is similar to how you would use "eye for an eye" and things along those lines. I got sanguis pro sanguine from Google. Is ...
Ayden Clark's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
506 views

Understanding a 7th century hymn

I am having some trouble understanding what the hymn Magnae Deus potentiae means, despite (I think) understanding all of its words. Magnae Deus potentiae, qui ex aquis ortum genus partim remittis ...
Figulus's user avatar
  • 4,771
2 votes
1 answer
83 views

How is ϡ pronounced in modern times? [closed]

The Greek letter sampi is not used in modern times, but I saw a sentence saying that it is still used in modern times to represent law numbers or book chapters. When I look up the pronunciation, all I ...
ististyle's user avatar
  • 123
7 votes
1 answer
266 views

Is "id tempus est" grammatical?

Someone said to me "Id tempus est" (It is time) but that does not strike me as grammatical. I responded that "id" is a dummy pronoun and "Tempus est" should be correct ...
CasualTea's user avatar
  • 101
5 votes
1 answer
72 views

How to say "Math Student" or other subjects

Would the genitive case be used here? Example: Alumnus mathematicae Or should the nominative be used? Alumnus mathematica
Peter Petigru's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
191 views

Exercitia Latina, Ch. 16: "...nāuigantī..."

My question stems from a task of comprehension from the exercises for Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata Familia Romana. What is the grammatical class of "nāuigantī" in the following excerpt ...
Mr. Blythe's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
1k views

Translating "He is my always" and "She is my forever"

My fiancé would like 2 Latin phrases for our wedding day to display, but we are struggling with the translation from English to Latin. The phrases we would like to translate are 'He is my always' and '...
user15106's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
161 views

Why does Ancient Greek "metá" mean both between and after?

The Ancient Greek word μετά means two very different things. Are there any other examples in world languages of a word for "between, with" being colexified with one for "after, next to&...
user avatar
-4 votes
1 answer
38 views

Vita Nostra est quad cognictationes nostra facere est [closed]

Translate to English Vita Nostra est quad cognictationes nostra facere est
Ty Mcc's user avatar
  • 5
3 votes
0 answers
68 views

Has anyone produced a Latin analyser/stemmer (e.g. for Elasticsearch)?

Learner of Latin and Ancient Greek here. Elasticsearch has a Greek stemmer, which according to my experiments works very well in my Elasticsearch-based application with Ancient Greek. No doubt that's ...
mike rodent's user avatar
  • 1,153
5 votes
1 answer
135 views

Exsistitne in lingua Latina verbum quod significat et avum et avam, ut Anglicum verbum "grandparent"?

Lingua Latina habet verbum quod significat et matrem et patrem, id est "parens". Sed parentes parentium appellantur... quid? Masculini parentes parentium appellantur avi et feminini ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
134 views

Translate phrase from Stephen King novel

In Stephen King's novel Song of Susannah, aka Dark Tower book 6, he has the phrase: In the Kingdom of Ago, the clocks tick... but their hands never move. I am translating this to Latin but find some ...
Adam's user avatar
  • 8,652

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