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Confessiones, sentence analysis

This is a sentence in Caput V, Liber II of Confessiones of Augustine: Cum interea non satageret idem pater qualis crescerem tibi. Here what's the case of qualis? According to the declension table it ...
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27 views

Are there “dominant relative clauses”?

So-called "dominant participle constructions" (also known as "ab urbe condita (AUC) constructions") are defined as follows: "syntactically speaking, an attributive participle modifies its head noun. ...
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2answers
51 views

Meaning of “M.H.P.” on a grave marker?

In translating the Latin-text gravestone of an early 18th century Capuchin, I encounter "M.H.P." at the end of the epitaph, followed by "A.M.D.G." --for "Ad maiorem Dei gloriam". I suspect the M.H.P. ...
4
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0answers
54 views

How does Homer say “finger” and “leg?”

The English-Greek dictionary by Woodhouse translates finger as "δάκτυλος." However, the Homeric dictionary by Cunliffe doesn't have this word, and searching in the text of Homer doesn't seem to turn ...
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0answers
26 views

προσώπατα versus πρόσωπα, προσώπασι versus προσώποις in Homer

I'm working on learning Homeric vocabulary, and for this purpose I've written a script using CLTK to search for forms of a particular word through the Iliad and Odyssey. The idea is that I don't want ...
4
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1answer
63 views

finding a Latin quote

I am reading the book "6/5" by Alexandre Laumonier, in French about high-frequency trading in electronic financial markets (bear with me). Near the end of "5", he says Pour autant, comme l'écrivit ...
3
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1answer
54 views

Is “whatever you say, do” an accurate translation of “quodcumque dixerit facite”?

Background: The Latin phrase, quodcumque dixerit vobis facite, taken from John 2:5 of the Vulgate, translates to, Whatsoever he shall say to you, do ye, according to the Douay-Rheims ...
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2answers
49 views

How to translate the phrases “both worlds” and “the best of both worlds” into Classical Latin?

How to properly write the expression "the best of both worlds" and the shorter phrase "both worlds" (meant in the same context as in the larger phrase) in Classical Latin?
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1answer
111 views

Correct writing for Laudato Si

I am wondering about writing the name of a document written by Pope Francis that goes by the Latin name Laudato si'. Someone has told me that the i requires an accent aigu but I see it written as ...
6
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1answer
354 views

Forming first-person plural imperatives

Sorry for the simple question, but I last took Latin in 1987 and I don't remember how to make a first-person plural imperative for "cogitare" (or any "are" verbs), and my Google searches are failing ...
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0answers
28 views

Online Latin Synonyms and Other Crossword Resources

Are there any online searchable synonym lists, i.e. thesauri? I don't mean scanned versions of books, I mean apps or search engines that list synonyms given a specific search word. I am interested in ...
3
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1answer
54 views

Latin-language newspaper

I took Latin in high school (c1995, United States) and each student in my class had a subscription to a Latin-language newspaper. I think it was published once a month or maybe bi-weekly, and it was ...
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0answers
43 views

Translations for a tattoo

I am wanting to have the phrases "you are worth it" and "you are good enough" translated into latin. The context would be a positive affirmation or a reminder to ones self. Any help is greatly ...
2
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1answer
165 views

What verb forms εἴσηκται as 3 s pf m/p?

I’m certain the form εἴσηκται is 3rd sing. perfect M/P but can’t for the life of me come up with what verb this is. Does anyone recognize this? Is it a misprint, or am I forgetting something obvious?
2
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1answer
94 views

Was there a standard accent in Latin in the Roman era?

I know that the standard language was Classical Latin and that the average person spoke Vulgar Latin, but was there a standard dialect, a standard pronounciation for Latin? Like the way it was spoken ...
2
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1answer
61 views

Is the word nihilanus/nihilumanus properly constructed? (From “nihil/nihilum” meaning “nothing” and the suffix “-anus” to denote origin)

I've been reading that the word silvanus comes from Latin silva (“forest”) +‎ -ānus (“from, of the”). So, "silvanus" literally means something like "who comes from the forest" or something similar. I ...
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48 views

Would this make sense?

So soon I'm getting a tattoo to say live without regret. I've pottered around on the internet a bit and found Sine Paenitentia Vive / Vive sine Paenitentia for this. I assume this is correct. I ...
4
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0answers
51 views

Gen 1:28 only animals that move or all living things?

The book of Genesis, 1:28 reads: Crescite et multiplicamini et replete terram et subicite eam et dominamini piscibus maris et volatilibus caeli et universis animantibus, quae moventur super terram ...
2
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1answer
68 views

How do I know if there's an “invisible yod”?

I've been told that the first syllable of abiciō is long by position, because it's actually an underlying *abjiciō, which causes it to be syllabified as *ab-ji-ci-ō before the *ji simplifies to i. So ...
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0answers
43 views

Sideros sidereus

How would one best combine the Latin “sidereus” and the Greek “σίδηρος” in an otherwise-English-language text to refer to meteoric iron? Ideally in a manner that would be authentic to ancient Roman ...
2
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1answer
58 views

Declination of “potentia” with preposition “in”

In philosophy, e.g. in Spinoza, there is the Latin word "potentia" that is often translated as a power, or capacity, to act (potentia agendi) and to suffer actions. I am wondering what is the right ...
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1answer
515 views

Is there a short list of feminine nouns in -ος?

Schoder and Horrigan (p. 23) say that a noun whose nominative ends in -ος, although "Three [feminine] exceptions ... will be noted in the vacabularies when they first occur." I originally took this to ...
5
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1answer
112 views

Could lacio and ἕλκω be related?

Would it be at all possible for Latin lacio "pull, lure" (cf. illicio, laqueus, lacesso, lacto) to be related with Greek ἕλκω "draw, pull"? Wiktionary suggests no cognates of lacio are known, so there ...
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1answer
65 views

How do you say “hunt or be hunted” or “hunt lest you be hunted” in Latin?

I found that neca ne neceris means "kill lest you be killed" and would like to modify this to "hunt lest you be hunted." It looks like venor is the verb for "hunting" but I'm not sure what the proper ...
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1answer
39 views

Translation for “Mortal willpower” (Tattoo idea!)

Or anything to a similar effect! I was also considering something along the lines of Strength beyond Gods or Willpower beyond Gods/Willpower that transcends the gods But, the original title phrase ...
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1answer
44 views

How can I say “school/university of life” in Latin?

I want to translate "school/university of life" into Latin. Meaning, where you learn about life. Thank you in advance.
4
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1answer
79 views

Is a translation from modern English to Latin meaningful?

First time visitor to the Latin Language SE. My attention was caught by this question: How does “It's totally fucked” translate to Latin? It wasn't the vulgarity that grabbed me though, it was the ...
3
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2answers
53 views

What is the closest latin wording for “Work to solve”? Opus solvere?

Contextually, it is the idea that work/effort should always be done with the goal of finding the solution to a problem or hurdle. Google suggests "Opus solvere" and the component words seem to make ...
4
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2answers
85 views

“Happy” and “sad” as emotional states in Homeric Greek

It seems like there's some interesting cross-cultural stuff going on in the description of emotions in Homeric Greek compared to my US/English way of talking about these things. For "happy," the words ...
5
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1answer
76 views

Understanding the grammar of “non ipsi nos” in Psalm 99

(Psalm 99:3) Scitóte quóniam Dóminus ipse est Deus: * ipse fecit nos, et non ipsi nos. (Douay Rheims) Know ye that the Lord he is God: * he made us, and not we ourselves. How exactly does one ...
3
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1answer
80 views

Summa Theologiae - se extendit

Summa Theologiae, Ia q. 14 a. 11 co.: Et ideo aliter dicendum est, quod, cum Deus sit causa rerum per suam scientiam, ut dictum est, intantum se extendit scientia Dei, inquantum se extendit eius ...
5
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2answers
124 views

masculine and feminine form of παῖς and μαθηματικός

As in a previous question, I'm wondering what is the feminine form of a noun, and this time it is not a word for an animal but for human. In words like ὁ παῖς and ἡ παῖς, only their article ...
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3answers
11k views

How does “It's totally fucked” translate to Latin?

The closest I can manage (uneducated) is "Prorsus Futui Est," but I suspect that's somewhat (if not completely) wrong.
2
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0answers
29 views

How to translate into latin “Success is the result of talent and hard work”

I am trying to translate into Latin the sentence: Success is the result of talent and hard work. Equivalent formulations: "talent and hard work lead to success", "success is the fruit of talent and ...
4
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1answer
215 views

feminine form of λύκος

λύκος is the Ancient Greek word for 'wolf' in singular masculine form. What is then the feminine form of wolf? I've guessed it as λύκη but what I've found in a dictionary is that it means 'light'. Is ...
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0answers
37 views

Duumvir vs Duovir

A Duumvir, or Duovir, is one member of a two-man council. Why are there two spellings, what does the nuance imply, and which one is correct under which circumstance?
3
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2answers
74 views

Does “Carpe Via” make sense?

I am contemplating a run of tee shirts for the Bicycling SE site. One of the phrases for confident cycling is to know when to "take the lane" which means that sometimes you have to ride in such a way ...
3
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0answers
53 views

The longest Ablative Absolute construction attested in the Latin literature?

I was curious about the longest Ablative Absolute (AA) construction attested in the Latin literature. For example, the following one from Plautus has seven AAs juxtaposed (used by him to create a ...
5
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2answers
914 views

Does ancient Greek have its own terms for grammar?

I'm working on ancient Greek (Homeric) vocabulary, and sometimes it's helpful to write down, e.g., on a flashcard, some grammatical information. For example I might want to record that ἕν is neuter (...
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0answers
28 views

Latin for “vexatious Litigant”

My days of decent knowledge of Latin are a little in the past since I passed my Latinum, and I am trying to get a good translation for what modern US courst call "vexatious litigant" into Latin for a ...
2
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0answers
34 views

Always loved / Always in my heart in latin

I'm getting a tattoo to honor my two living children. Son and daughter. Would semper amari or semper amatus be most appropriate? Or is there another option? Thank You
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0answers
47 views

What is the prerequisite of reading Cicero or Caesar?

Beside grammar, how much vocabulary do I have to know? Should I buy some latin dictionary like Oxford Latin Dictionary? Or is there any word-correction for novice learner?
4
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1answer
169 views

Life and death in Latin

I want to use "Life and death" in Latin as a title for an important writting, but I want to make sure its translation and context is correct: Is this the correct way?: Vitam et Mortem
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1answer
4k views

Does it make sense to display a decimal number such as 12.34 as Roman numerals? If not, how else?

I'm auto-converting any "Arabic" number in a text to Roman numerals. This means that: 123 Becomes: CXXIII But what to do when I encounter decimals such as: 12.34 ? Should I really do: XII....
5
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1answer
70 views

Counting to ten in Homeric Greek

How do you count to ten in Homeric Greek? The following is what I put together by knowing how to count to ten in modern Greek, and then looking for ancient forms that looked similar. Is this right for ...
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0answers
43 views

Old illustrated books showing daily life in ancient Greece or Rome

When I was learning French, I found it very helpful to work on my vocabulary using a picture book called First Thousand Words in French. For example, it would have something like a full-page picture ...
1
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2answers
75 views

Only By Giving in Latin

How do I write "Only by Giving" in Latin, trying to nurture a 'Spirit of Giving', for example, "Only by Giving can we fulfill the purpose of life." What would be the best option? Would it be, SOLUM ...
3
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1answer
122 views

Was there a link between happiness and the fascinum?

Catullus 7 ends with the following lines: quae nec pernumerāre cūriōsī possint, nec mala fascināre lingua. [Kisses] which the curious cannot count and an evil tongue cannot hex. According ...
4
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1answer
217 views

Latinisation of a surname. Seeking advice from expert Latinists

I have a need to Latinise a surname (details about that name are provided further down in my question) rather urgently, but with my miniscule knowledge of Latin I cannot do that myself well. I hope ...
0
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1answer
106 views

Translation of ab and de in Greek,

How would one best translate ab and de from Latin to Greek in order to capture the different nuances? In Greek both are usually translated as από. I am trying to capture the nuances so I am using ...

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