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0answers
22 views

Is there any new published book that is written in latin?

I wondered that is there any new book that is written in latin publishing now ? Like new latin books in 21st century. If so what is the difference of new published books from the literature of ...
1
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0answers
29 views

What is “Vet.” or “Veter.” an abbreviation for in these references?

Gibbon references "Panegyric Vet." or "Panegyric Veter." a few times in DandF's notes, e.g. the orator Eumenius (Panegyric Veter. viii 6, or Panegyr. Vet. v 18. The Panegyric is ...
1
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1answer
27 views

What would be the correct translation, to the latin, for this phrase: “The blood of the One who is the Rock of our salvation”

What would be the correct translation, to the Latin, for this phrase: "The blood of the One who is the Rock of our salvation". This is a Christian phrase that will be put on a seal. I have ...
0
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2answers
51 views

What is the translation of “numerus qui est minor quam nullus”

I have difficulties on translating the sentence "numerus qui est minor quam nullus". What's the English translation of this?
5
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1answer
513 views

Translation of “Mors dolorum omnium exsolutio est et finis”

What is the proper translation of the phrase (though, I am not sure it is a complete phrase): Mors dolorum omnium exsolutio est et finis As far as I can see, this is an excerpt from section 19 from ...
7
votes
2answers
166 views

Interrogative pronouns about animals (Quis aut quid)

If I want to ask the question about the dog, whose name is Cerberus should I ask Quis est Cerberus? or Quid est Cerberus? Do we use quis or quae (according to gender) about animals or quid? What ...
2
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1answer
64 views

Is there such a colocation as “Dei Canet” and what does it mean?

The Russian author Alexander Grin has a short story called "Blind Dei Canet." Dei Canet is a character's name, and it sounds Latin to me. I would like to know what Dei Canet can possibly ...
5
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2answers
228 views

αναβαινω aorist active indicative 2nd athematic

Why does αναβαινω takes an aorist active indicative 2nd athematic (-μι) ending (ανεβην) whereas αναβαινω is a thematic (-ω) verb and thus should be spelled ανεβον (aorist active indicative 2nd ...
3
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1answer
63 views

Clarifications regarding translation of the phrase “Id agendum est ut satis vixerimus”

I am looking for lineal translation (or rather some clarifications) of a phrase from Letter 23 of Moral letters to Lucilius: Id agendum est ut satis vixerimus (I have found the Latin original here) ...
4
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1answer
279 views

Does G ever visibly assimilate in voice?

According to Allen's Vox Latina, /b/ regularly becomes voiceless before a voiceless consonant. This shows up sometimes in writing: for example, we see forms of ob-sideō written occasionally as opsideō....
2
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0answers
31 views

How did the Romans Express the Concept of Symbiosis?

Symbiosis (the association of two different organisms attached to each other or one within the other for mutual advantage) derived from the Greek, sumbiosis = "a living together", does not ...
10
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1answer
242 views

Is there any Latin in the Bible?

It is my understanding that the original text of the Bible is mostly in Hebrew and Greek. There are a few quotes from other languages, like “Mene mene tekel …” (language seems to be unclear) or Jesus'...
6
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3answers
1k views

Expression warning that some things can't be easily undone and one might want to think about this a while longer?

For example, a tattoo can semi-permanently mark two people, indicating their relationship. Human relationships and individual behavior are unpredictable compared to the permanence of tattoos. Of ...
7
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2answers
2k views

Translation for tattoo

I am looking at getting a tattoo with my best friend ( both female) Have been looking at words to describe friendship/ sisterhood/ soul mates. Ideally a sentence or phrase. For example 'Not sisters by ...
3
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1answer
88 views

When do the earliest rhymes appear in Koine or Medieval Greek?

I understand that rhyme is well established in Medieval Greek (and Latin) after the 11-12th centuries. But surely there are attested earlier cases before that. Do they go back to Koine? Maybe before ...
6
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2answers
217 views

πλήθει, dual use of πλῆθος in Philebus

One word seems to me somehow very strange with its dual number. It is in a passage from Plato's Philebus: φωνὴ μὲν ἡμῖν ἐστί που μία διὰ τοῦ στόματος ἰοῦσα, καὶ ἄπειρος αὖ πλήθει, πάντων τε καὶ ...
4
votes
1answer
62 views

Case of “machina” in “Deus ex machina”?

According to https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/machina#Declension the case of "machina" only can be nominative, vocative or ablative. As the meaning of the phrase is "god descended on the ...
2
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2answers
80 views

How to translate “The chapters must be studied well to pass the test.”?

I want to know how such sentences are translated into latin when there is no subject.
4
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1answer
115 views

Philosophical meaning of “ens causa sui”?

While shopping for Gold online, I've come across this coin which is engraved with the following writings: ens causa sui and ex unitae vires Now, you would think a quick online search would return a ...
6
votes
1answer
397 views

Where is φιλημι attested?

I've often heard it said that Aeolic Greek used -μι endings on contract verbs, like φιλημι in Sappho (for Attic φιλέω/φιλῶ). However, I can't seem to find this supposed "φιλημι" anywhere. It ...
2
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2answers
80 views

What would be correct way to say “very fortunate “

Trying to find the correct adjective for “very lucky/very fortunate “ in feminine singular. Valde fortunata or ipsum fortunata?
1
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1answer
51 views

Trying to coin a new word, and trying to stay true to Latin Sandhi phonological rules

I'm writing a paper and I'm proposing a couple of new latin terms: alterpersona realterpersona or to break them down into components alter-persona re-alter-persona I'm wondering about the sandhi ...
4
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2answers
52 views

Follow up “It's not a bug, it's a feature”

Following up Help translating "It's not a bug, it's a feature!"?, non erratum sed designatum came up as a great way to say "not a wrong step, but working as designed" as in ...
6
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1answer
232 views

Finding the original Latin text of Seneca (“No tree becomes rooted and sturdy unless many a wind assails it.”)

In what text of Seneca will I find the Latin for the statement, one English translation of which is, "No tree becomes rooted and sturdy unless many a wind assails it."
9
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2answers
1k views

Why is Antirrhinum written with two 'r'?

According to Wikipedia Antirrhinum (Dragon flower) is derived from ἀντί anti "against, like", and ῥίς rhis "nose". Therefore, I would expect it to be pronounced Anti-rrhinum (with ...
5
votes
1answer
91 views

Genitive case: why “litterarum vetustatem” and not “litteras vetustatis”

From time time I encounter a pair of nouns; one noun is in a genitive case, apparently modifies the other, but where I expect them to behave differently. examples: memoriae tradere litterarum ...
3
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1answer
53 views

“Project Management” in Latin

I was looking for a translation for "project management" and its adjacents (project manager etc.). There's surprisingly few direct translations for "project", but I've managed to ...
1
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1answer
56 views

I am looking for the Latin translation for 'these are the good times' As in enjoy right now and live in the moment. can anyone help?

I am looking for the Latin translation for 'these are the good times' As in enjoy right now and live in the moment. can anyone help?
4
votes
1answer
155 views

Why is Certainty to be Expressed by the Present Subjunctive?

In North & Hillard Ex. 209 the following is to be translated into Latin: The general delivered this speech before his men: "You see how great the forces of the enemy are, and how impregnable ...
8
votes
2answers
636 views

Is “Jacob” genitive in “jubilate deo jacob”?

"Jubilate deo Jacob" is translated everywhere as "rejoice unto the god of Jacob". But from what little I know, Jacob is not in the genitive case. May I ask if this was a ...
2
votes
1answer
73 views

How to translate a variant of 'Per aspera ad astra'

How would you translate 'through the will of man to the stars' or 'through the indomitable human spirit to the stars'(more accurately, the latter)? Of course, I'm not looking for a literal translation,...
8
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1answer
3k views

Help translating “It's not a bug, it's a feature!”?

I know no Latin, but playing around with Google Translate I came up with "Non insectum opus est". Insectum seems like a good stand in for a generic bug, but maybe blatta is better (see http:/...
1
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1answer
70 views

Does this Latin phrase convey a meaning?

I'd like to utilize Homines Ludente, Homines Impudente as an epigraph. But I'm not sure whether it conveys a meaning. Thanks for your help!
4
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2answers
416 views

In “fortis fortuna adiuvat” is “fortis” accusative plural?

Fortis fortuna adiuvat, is fortis accusative plural here? Fortis has different forms for the same conjugation as I see at Wiktionary, and I couldn't find which forms adiuvare takes as an exhaustive ...
5
votes
1answer
85 views

Is there a dictionary that actually shows the verb patterns?

Is there a Latin dictionary that actually show the verb patterns? Patterns like Adiuvare + accusative somebody Ire + dative location Otherwise I only see the examples and it is not possible to ...
6
votes
1answer
68 views

In Latin, is there an “adjective form of nation name” vs genitive “of nation name” distinction?

In Latin, is there an “adjective form of nation name” vs “of nation name” distinction? In English we can say “Church of Rome” or “Roman Church”, or “Embassy of Germany” or German Embassy”, or “Prime ...
15
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1answer
1k views

Abbreviations used by Romans in their inscriptions

While watching a documentary, I came across this Roman tombstone of three Jewish freedmen (below is the image): The expanded transcription available online is, L(ucius) Valerius L(uci) l(ibertus) ...
3
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0answers
57 views

Gildersleeve's latin grammar or Kennedy's Revised Latin Primer?

Which one is more complete, Kennedy's Revised Latin Primer of Gildersleeve's grammar?
8
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1answer
340 views

Why does “Hominem unius libri timeo” use comparativus unius instead of positivus unum?

Why does "Hominem unius libri timeo" use comparativus unius instead of positivus unum? Does it mean "I fear a man of one book (more)"? Or does that unius belong to hominem because ...
6
votes
1answer
118 views

What are some notable works never translated from Latin?

I guess most, if not all, of classical-period works that have survived, were translated. But I'm certain many of the medieval era works were never published in a language other than their Latin ...
2
votes
1answer
79 views

Translation of “Trying is the first step towards failure”

A somewhat famous quote by Homer Simpson: Trying is the first step towards failure How would this be translated into Latin? Both a direct translation and/or a shortened version capturing the essence ...
5
votes
1answer
118 views

Is “Nihil Labore Difficile” good grammar?

The slogan adopted by my old school had adopted was the Latin phrase nihil labore difficile. They claimed that it meant that "nothing is difficult with hard work". However, is this slogan ...
3
votes
1answer
36 views

What to call an “academy research fellow”?

I started today in a new position called "academy research fellow". The title means that I hold a specific five-year grant aimed for research and starting a research group, and is roughly ...
4
votes
1answer
115 views

“Finit hic, deo” – is the movie translation correct?

Is it correct that “Finit hic, deo” translates into “God ends here” like they say in the movie “The Nun”? (The scene in the movie where the phrase is seen and the translation is given can be viewed ...
6
votes
1answer
112 views

What is the meaning of the suffix -ox as in ferox?

I have found different explanations for the meaning, but they all seem contradictory. It shows exaggeration of an existing adjective (atrōx < āter) It shows exaggeration of an existing verb (fĕrox ...
3
votes
1answer
82 views

How to translate “Wise words about life” into latin?

As it is said on title, how to translate "Wise words about life" into latin? Edit: Answer to Nickimite Some examples about wise words as I mean: nanos gigantum humeris insidentes nulius in ...
4
votes
1answer
65 views

Deponent verb participle gender

If we consider a deponent verb such as arbitrārī in the perfect tense, hence arbitrātus sum/es/est, is the participle arbitrātus supposed to be declined like a regular adjective? For example if one ...
36
votes
3answers
7k views

Could all soldiers in the Roman army actually speak Latin?

I am under the impression that men for the legions of the Roman Empire were conscripted across the empire, and so Latin could not have possibly been the first language to every soldier. But could all ...
7
votes
3answers
359 views

Use of accusative instead of ablative with 'pro'

I saw written in a coat of arms "PRO MARE NOSTRVM", but we all know that the preposition "pro" takes ablative, so the right form would be "PRO MARI NOSTRO" wouldn't it? I ...
13
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1answer
474 views

Why are so many Latin men's names (cognomina) in the usually-feminine first declension?

The first declension, with the -a ending, is usually feminine. Why are so many men's names (cognomina), however, in the first declension -- Seneca, Cinna, Aggrippa, Sulla, and more? This is far out of ...

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