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7
votes
1answer
276 views

Is “urgeo inurgor” a correct Latin phrase, meaning “to squeeze the unsqeezable”?

As a tongue-in-cheek joke, I'm trying to make a motto out of Russian phrase "впихнуть невпихуемое", which is literally translated as "to squeeze unsqueezable". 'Squeeze' being used in this context as ...
9
votes
2answers
690 views

How can I translate “Who cares for the carers?”

Trying for a pithy bit of Latin to echo "Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?" Carers as in doctors / nurses etc. Sorry, to clarify... My understanding / interpretation is that "who guards the guards?" ...
6
votes
1answer
686 views

Is there a (cultural, religious etc?) reason, why equus and aequus are nearly homophones?

Equus: (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈe.kʷus/, [ˈɛ.kʷʊs] Aequus: (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈae̯.kʷus/, [ˈae̯.kʷʊs] Is this similarity coincidental or do they have a common origin? Are there any specific ...
5
votes
1answer
2k views

What's the difference between “media” and “medio” in “virtus in medio stat”?

In Wikipedia's list of Latin phrases, the expression virtus in medio stat is included, with the explanation: Idiomatically: Good practice lies in the middle path. There is disagreement as to ...
14
votes
1answer
147 views

Is there a Latinism for “under fire”/“in combat”/“under duress”?

This question is partially open ended. I'm looking for a Latin idiom or euphemism or phrase that expresses something being from or related to practice as opposed to being related to theory. ...
5
votes
2answers
88 views

Translation of “trumped up charges”

There was a Greek play translated to Latin wherein a term was translated then to English as "trumped up charges". Might somebody know the play and more particularly the term itself?
11
votes
2answers
243 views

Was -oe- used natively in standard classical Latin, or was every word with -oe- adopted from a foreign or non-standard origin?

Latin has quite a few words with -oe-, such as Poenus and moenia. But I've heard it said that all of those words are either translitterations from Greek -oi- or adopted from non-standard dialects of ...
8
votes
2answers
899 views

How to say “Don't even…”?

The following constructions feel simple enough: "You don't even move." — Ne moveris quidem. "Don't move!" — Noli moveri! or "Ne motus sis." But what if I want to give a negative ...
7
votes
1answer
793 views

Can *ne* in *ne … quidem* mean *ne* instead of *non*?

In all examples I have seen, the ne in ne … quidem could be replaced with non alone, leaving out the quidem (thus changing the meaning from "not even" to "not"), and still make a grammatically ...
12
votes
1answer
330 views

Do Possessive Pronouns Always Agree with the Thing Being Possessed?

I recently came across this sentence (a practice sentence with no given answer) in my Latin textbook: mare nostrum plurimos portus habet I translated this as 'The sea has most of our harbour.' ...
15
votes
2answers
900 views

What is the difference between -us and -io?

One can derive nouns from verbs by attaching -us or -io to the perfect participle stem. For example, movere gives rise to motus (fourth declension) and motio. The meanings of these derived words are ...
15
votes
1answer
212 views

Were there grammatical disagreements in Latin?

Latin has such a long history that at some point some native — or otherwise very fluent — speakers surely have disagreed about what is correct and grammatical Latin. I would like to know ...
4
votes
1answer
553 views

eadem mutata resurgo

What is the role of eadem mutata in this phrase? I'm guessing either neuter plural accusative of extent, or feminine nominative as apposition to an implied ego. The original context of this line is ...
13
votes
1answer
954 views

Prepositions/adpositions with genitive?

In Latin, there are prepositions that may be followed by a noun in accusative (like ad), ablative (cum) or both (in). I once thought ope was a preposition to be used with genitive, which I found ...
8
votes
2answers
23k views

Translation of the Latin lyrics in Avenged Sevenfold's “Requiem”?

In Avenged Sevenfold's "Requiem" there is a passage in Latin at the very beginning of the song. It says something like: Prodigia comploratus Silens, oro Regnet exitium I know nothing about ...
7
votes
1answer
336 views

Flavor/meaning/nuance of “aliquando” in “tandem aliquando”?

The first sentence of Cicero's second Catilinarian reads in part Tandem aliquando, Quirites, L. Catilinam . . . ex urbe . . . ejecimus. (I realize I'm leaving out all the fun parts; forgive me.) ...
3
votes
1answer
87 views

What is the semantic field of 'cȳma'?

[ Wiktionary : ] Etymology From the Ancient Greek κῦμα ‎(kûma), from κύω ‎(kúō, “I am pregnant, I conceive”). *κυμαί ‎(*kumaí), the first-declension nominative plural form which would give ...
46
votes
17answers
17k views

Which online Latin dictionaries should I use and why?

What good online Latin dictionaries do you know? What are their benefits and drawbacks? Please give only one dictionary per answer. If you have many dictionaries to suggest, give multiple answers &...
15
votes
2answers
752 views

What is the vocative of Gnaeus?

I would like to know how to decline the name Gnaeus in vocative. I see three options: Gnaee (regular declension) Gnai (would make sense by analogy to Gai if the name is pronounced /gnaius/) Gnaeus (...
4
votes
1answer
153 views

What is the meaning of “ratio” in the second Catilinarian V.9?

Having finally gotten a basic handle on the sorts of things rés can mean, I find myself stymied by ratió. I've understood it as meaning essentially "process of (logical) thinking," and that tends to ...
22
votes
3answers
8k views

Meaning of “S. P. D.” in letters

I have been reading Cicero's letters in translation on the Perseus.uchicago.edu site, but check the Latin to improve my limited ability. Most of the letters include S. P. D. in the salutation, and I ...
7
votes
1answer
203 views

What does 'ad tantam mollem' refer to in this context?

This is from an explanation of the six Ptolemaic statements, the one that concludes that the world is round (terram esse rotundam). Terra tamen ob duritiem non potuit perfectam rotunditatem ...
11
votes
2answers
2k views

Does there exist an passive form of sum, esse, fui?

I've never seen anything except this provide passive forms of the verb esse. And even with that most of the passive forms are crossed out. Why is this? It would make sense for there to be no passive ...
5
votes
2answers
159 views

Is ūnō a relative pronoun in this sentence?

I can't understand what ūnō means in this sentence, or what grammatical role it provides: uxor quae bona est ūnō uirō est contenta. The sentence is from page 70 of A Latin Grammar by James ...
8
votes
1answer
301 views

Why is there an “o” in “controversus”?

Apparently, contrōversus comes from the preposition contrā- + versus. So why does it have "ō" instead of "ā"? I checked Lewis and Short, but it doesn't explain the development of this vowel. I also ...
8
votes
2answers
120 views

Which agents are human?

The agent of a passive construction is in ablative, and human agents also come with the preposition a/ab. For example, Marcus a Gnaeo occisus est but Marcus sica occisus est. But which agents should ...
4
votes
1answer
107 views

Ancient sources for singing in a bath

Years ago a fellow Latinist told me that singing in the shower is not a new invention. He mentioned some ancient (Roman, I believe) writer mentioning that singing is convenient while bathing due to ...
4
votes
2answers
240 views

Is “ambulabat” a present participle in the imperfect?

This passage is from Matthaeus 14:29 of the Latin Vulgate. I've included much of the surrounding text because the lack of punctuation makes it difficult for me to distinguish the sentence structure. ...
7
votes
3answers
9k views

How to say Mister (Mrs, Miss, etc.) in Latin

I will mark this question as contemporary-latin because there are obviously not any precise classical equivalents of the titles implied by such English honorifics as Mr (Mister or Master), Mrs (Misses)...
8
votes
1answer
370 views

Are Latin feminine academic titles used in formal occasions?

Many universities use Latin in some ceremonial occasions. Many academic titles in Latin are masculine but have natural feminine counterparts: doctor–doctrix, lector–lectrix, professor&...
9
votes
2answers
2k views

Three forms of a Latin verb?

Why do Latin to English dictionaries list three forms of a Latin verb? I've seen this other places like grammar books too. For example: sedeō, sēdī, sessum: to sit. There's no Latin keyboard for ...
8
votes
1answer
75 views

Recommendations for “easy” philosophical/political Latin?

My Latin is okay reading Cæsar and Livy, and I'm even (mostly) fine reading Cicero's vicious attacks on the enemies of whoever happened to hire him for the occasion. But when I come to philosophy and ...
12
votes
3answers
503 views

Why does singular “mons” become plural “montes”?

Some singular third declension nouns, ending in -s, have a t in their stem, so: singular mons → plural montes infans → infantes miles → milites I understand these to be examples of "lingual" ...
4
votes
3answers
3k views

Etymology of English words “mother” and “father”

Usually, it's easy to tell whether a word has Latin or German ancestry. Water ("wasser") clearly comes from German, whereas aquatic ("aqua") clearly comes from Latin. But what's harder for me to tell,...
8
votes
2answers
1k views

Is there a difference between septimana and hebdomas?

My dictionary gives two translations for "week": septimāna and hebdomas (gen. hebdomadis, feminine). Is there a difference between these two words? Are there contexts where only one of them is ...
7
votes
1answer
401 views

Classical words for spelt

The Latin Wikipedia article about spelt mentions two ancient Latin names for spelt: spelta and scandala. I have found spelta used in more recent Latin, but nothing ancient. I have never seen scandala &...
3
votes
1answer
189 views

What did the prefix 'de' mean in: de- + lacere?

[ Etymonline : ]  [...]  from Late Latin deliciosus "delicious, delicate," from Latin delicia (plural deliciae) "a delight, allurement, charm," from delicere "to allure, entice," from de- "away" (...
4
votes
1answer
137 views

Resources that classify words/definitions by period in Latin history?

I'm trying to develop a stronger sense of what/how Latin vocabulary was used at different points in the history of the language. In looking around Google and archive.org, I've found dictionaries from, ...
10
votes
1answer
870 views

Unde “-cundus”?

I have learned that there is a suffix -cundus, found in words like fecundus, jucundus/jocundus, and rubicundus, which means something like "full of" or "characterized by." It seems to often be ...
17
votes
2answers
590 views

Why is the passive participle in Matthew 10:1 rendered as active in English?

I'm a little confused by the clause that begins Matthew 10: 10:1 Et convocatis duodecim discipulis suis, dedit illis potestatem spirituum immundorum, ut ejicerent eos, et curarent omnem languorem,...
6
votes
2answers
418 views

How to use apposition with vocative?

I am uncertain when to use nominative and when vocative in an apposition related to direct address. This issue is easiest to describe with examples. I have understood that the following use is correct:...
7
votes
1answer
337 views

How to burn one's bridges in Latin?

If you leave a situation or a job in a way that makes you unwelcome to return ever again, you can be said to burn your bridges in English. Is there an idiom in classical Latin for irrevocably ...
8
votes
3answers
594 views

“Populus Romanus Quiritium” as vocative?

In Latin Prose Composition by John Arbuthnot Nairn (Cambridge UP, 1926; p. 5 of "Versions" section), I find the following as a translation of Shakespeare's "Friends, Romans, countrymen, lend me your ...
5
votes
1answer
256 views

When were trivialis and quadrivialis introduced?

The seven liberal arts were divided into trivium and quadrivium. The easier half, trivium, gives rise to the adjective trivialis, which has connotations of simplicity and vulgarity. The adjective ...
7
votes
0answers
110 views

In Confessions I.18, does Augustine clearly indicate the physical death of an enemy?

In Augustine's Confessions, I.18, he writes: et certe non est interior litterarum scientia quam scripta conscientia, id se alteri facere quod nolit pati. quam tu secretus es, habitans in excelsis ...
11
votes
2answers
262 views

Did grammarians consider the adverbial -e a case ending?

For adjectives of the first and second declension, the corresponding adverb is formed with the ending -e. For example, pulchre (beautifully) comes from pulcher (beautiful). Canonically this -e is ...
9
votes
2answers
456 views

Are vowels long before “gn”?

Allen and Greenough, §10d, provide a general rule: A vowel before ns, nf, gn, is long: as in cōnstāns, īnferō, māgnus [emphasis modified] This seems to agree with Priscian: 'gnus' quoque vel '...
9
votes
1answer
797 views

What is the origin of the 3rd-person plural perfect ending “-ēre”?

Laudavēre is an (apparently older) alternative to laudaverunt. What is the origin of this ending? Is it connected with any other known endings or affixes? Clackson & Horrocks say it is from an ...
7
votes
3answers
213 views

Can I contract with an irregular perfect stem in v?

I know that if I have a regular first conjugation verb, I can contract some forms. For example, amavisti and amaverunt can become amasti and amarunt, and I have come across such forms repeatedly. Can ...
12
votes
4answers
481 views

Classical Latin translations from extant Greek sources (or vice versa)

Are there any ancient works, or parts of ancient works, which we possess in both Greek and Latin -- i.e. both the original and a translation, made in antiquity, into the other language? I know there ...

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