All Questions

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
8
votes
1answer
92 views

Quo modo Latine redditur “fool proof”?

Quo modo expressio Anglica "fool proof" Latine reddi potest? Nullum idioma Latinum significatione simile scio. Eandem rem Latine exprimere possum, exempli gratia dicendo "perbene munitus", sed malim ...
6
votes
2answers
137 views

What does “condó” mean in this sentence?

In the odds and ends section of Ephemeris, a Latin news site, a recent article tells the story of a cat whose owner accidentally put him in the mail along with some DVDs. (Happily, Cupcake survived.) ...
9
votes
3answers
519 views

Semantic differences between verbs of thinking

Latin has lots of verbs which can be translated as "think", including puto, opinor, arbitror, existimo, reor, censeo, cogito, and doubtless many others. How might one get a handle on the semantic ...
8
votes
4answers
5k views

Is there a gender-neutral pronoun for people in Latin?

Sometimes it is preferable to leave a person's gender undisclosed and some people do not fall into the usual two gender categories. This requires some adaptations in languages that indicate gender in ...
8
votes
3answers
218 views

How to translate phrases using “prospectus”

I want to translate two phrases: The view [with the meaning of "focus"] to all. I'm thinking: prospectus omnium And the opposite: The view to [only] the strong ones. I think prospectus ...
12
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the correct way to say “Noctis Avem”?

I'm looking to use "Night bird" as a name or title for something. I don't know which, if any, of the following would be correct: Noctis Avem Avem Noctis Avis Noctem Avem nox etc. What rules come ...
16
votes
1answer
1k views

What are the key differences between the main Latin verbs meaning “to kill”?

I'm a student and my class laughs when we learn a new verb for "to kill". Just to list some of them: necare interficere extinguere There are of course many others. What are the key differences ...
19
votes
4answers
437 views

Did the Romans derive verbs from names?

I know the Romans did derive verbs from nouns (laudare, finire, lucere…), but did they ever derive verbs from names? The Greeks did, for example forming homerizein (ὁμηρίζ&...
14
votes
4answers
2k views

Proper parsing of “Ite, missa est”

In the Catholic liturgy at the dismissal, the Latin phrase used is "Ite, missa est." The usual translation for this is "Go, the Mass has ended." Can someone suggest a proper parsing of this somewhat ...
10
votes
3answers
479 views

What is “user account” in Latin?

I was thinking about expanding our help page in Latin, and I realized I don't know a good expression for "user account" in Latin. A "user" can be reasonably translated as usor, but "account" is harder....
12
votes
2answers
2k views

Which verb for drinking is least related to alcohol?

In English, like in many other languages, "to drink" often means "to drink alcohol". I dislike this connotation, and I would like to be able to talk about drinking with minimal alcoholic connotations. ...
24
votes
1answer
4k views

What are the classical names of the letters of the Latin alphabet?

When I refer to letters in Latin, I (sadly) use the English names for them. If I knew the Latin names, I could apply Classical Latin pronunciation rules to say them properly. So, how was each ...
15
votes
1answer
345 views

Are there dictionaries that translate profanities profanely?

Sometimes I come across Latin profanities, for example when reading a certain poem of Catullus. Many dictionaries fail to translate profanities properly, perhaps in order to maintain a certain level ...
10
votes
2answers
4k views

Is there a plural of Jesus in Latin?

The name Iesus has peculiar declension in Latin. The declension of this word in every source that I have seen only gives singular forms. However, I can imagine situations where a plural is needed: a ...
21
votes
1answer
825 views

When did the word “ly” enter the Latin language and where did it come from?

In an answer to this question, I gave examples of the word "ly" in Medieval Latin. This leads me to wonder when the term entered the language and where it came from? Because it resembles the article ...
13
votes
4answers
322 views

Speaking about an inflected word in Latin

In English, it is fairly common to write/say such sentences as the following: What is the possessive case of she? Should I use who or whom after man? What is the past participle of run? These kinds ...
6
votes
1answer
246 views

Why is “paeniteo” considered more correct than “poeniteo”?

Through answers to another question, I came across Lewis & Short's definition of paeniteo, which begins: paenĭtĕo (less correctly poen- ) L&S say that it comes from the Greek ποινή, which ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

How to say “I regret to inform you that”?

How to express the following sentence in Latin? I am after a good choice of structure, not a literal translation. "I regret to inform you that our old teacher has died." My suggestion is Doleo te ...
7
votes
3answers
139 views

Does every word have a case?

Poēta puellae fābulam narrat. Does every word in here have a case (i.e. dative, accusative, nominative, etc)?
1
vote
1answer
75 views

What underlying semantic notions connect 'campus' to the PIE root *kam-p- (to bend)?

Univ. Texas's page on kam-p-   'to bend' states: 'Semantic Field: to Bend'. Then I saw campus (plain, campus, open field) listed, but what semantic notions underlie it and 'to bend'? I can ...
11
votes
2answers
507 views

Is -um (instead of -ōrum) a typical genitive plural ending outside of poetry?

I understand that Vergil often uses the -um genitive plural ending for some second declension nouns, instead of -ōrum. For example: huc delecta virum sortiti corpora furtim (Aeneid, Book II, line ...
2
votes
1answer
77 views

What semantic notions underlie 'paene' to the PIE root 'pē(i)-' (to hurt, scold, shame)?

Reading the etymology of fiend propelled me to read Univ. Texas's page on the PIE etymon     pē(i)-, pī-     'to hurt, scold, shame', whose Semantic Fields are stated as: to ...
12
votes
2answers
866 views

Ante urbem conditam

The phrase ab urbe condita is used to express time in years after founding Rome. This can be found in ancient texts. It seems that the natural counterpart would be ante urbem conditam when one wants ...
17
votes
2answers
4k views

What is the distinction between gaudium and laetitia when both denote “joy”?

Both gaudium and laetitia denote joy, but appear to be used differently depending on the circumstances. What is the distinction between the two (or more) Latin words for joy?
6
votes
1answer
361 views

Why is elision more common than synizesis?

In classical poetry, if two vowels are next to each other (without a consonant in between), there are two ways to avoid the collision: Elision removes one of the vowels when the vowels meet at a word ...
8
votes
3answers
145 views

Elementary word order question

Why is this word order correct, as opposed to putting the verb at the end of the sentence? Frater meus habet unum filium. This site supplied this quote.
6
votes
0answers
85 views

How common was synizesis in classical poetry?

In synizesis two vowels that would normally be pronounced separately are pronounced as one without any change in spelling. This happens sometimes in Latin poetry and it can be recognized from the ...
6
votes
1answer
187 views

Meaning of “cepeo”

What does cepeo mean? According to Google Translate, this means "onions". Are there any connotations, other words that carry the same meaning, or anything else specifically related to it?
8
votes
2answers
1k views

How do you parse “futurum est” in Matthew 2:13?

I'm a little confused about a verse in Matthew 2 of the Vulgate Bible. Futurum est enim ut Herodes quærat puerum ad perdendum eum. (Matthew 2:13) Douay-Rheims translates this as, "For it will ...
6
votes
1answer
178 views

How to wear unusual clothing?

If I wear a toga, I can say toga me vestio/induo or toga vestior/induor or I could use the adjective togatus. For normal clothing it is clear what it means when I say that I wear it. I do not know, ...
8
votes
1answer
140 views

How did 'ad' + 'hūc' compound to get its meanings?

[ Adverb   adhūc : ]   Etymology     ad "to" + hūc "here" so far, thus far, hitherto, still [2.1] again; [2.2] furthermore; [2.3] moreover; [2.4] besides (used in scholastic debates to ...
6
votes
1answer
123 views

Were comma splices avoided in Modern Latin?

In Lingua Latin per se Illustrata I, Orberg generally avoids comma splices, that is, he typically connects independent clauses in a single sentence with semicolons, dashes, or coordinating ...
9
votes
1answer
133 views

How to say “it's a question of” or “it's all about”?

How can I express something like the following sentences in Latin? Being a teacher is simple; it's a question of discipline. I don't care if I win or not; it's all about surviving. I can offer some ...
14
votes
1answer
179 views

Why does “e” occur in forms of 'vōs' but not 'nōs'?

The forms of nōs and vōs exhibit a pattern, except in the genitive (nostrī/um, vestrī/um) and the possessive (noster, vester). Did vōs originally resemble nōs in all its forms, only to diverge later? ...
23
votes
1answer
884 views

Why do ablatives of the 3rd declension sometimes end on -e, at other times on -i?

Normally, substantive nouns of the 3rd declension get an -e in the ablative (patre), and adjectives of the 3rd get an -i (audaci). This is already odd: normally, substantives and adjectives, both ...
14
votes
2answers
566 views

What word order resolves the ambiguity of two nominative nouns in a sentence?

This question is a beginner's confusion about sentences of the form: [subject_noun] [object_noun] est. E.g. Bob agricola est. From my understanding, both the subject and object are declined in ...
16
votes
1answer
581 views

Did ancient Romans develop cryptography for Latin?

Did the Romans ever develop any form of cryptography, where either words were replaced with other words or letters were replaced with other letters? Do we have any remaining examples, and if so have ...
5
votes
1answer
120 views

What does 'iconic' mean in the context of the reduplication in Latin 'carcer'?

incarceration (n.) "fact of being imprisoned," 1530s, from Medieval Latin incarcerationem (nominative incarceratio), noun of action from past participle stem of incarcerare "to imprison," from ...
11
votes
2answers
1k views

Relationship between early Latin and Greek?

I am just restarting my schoolgirl Latin, but have already become fascinated with its links to Greek. According to Wheelock, whom I have absolutely no right to question, both Latin and Greek are ...
8
votes
2answers
380 views

DVCITIS, DUCITIS, DŪCITIS

Are all three of these valid spellings and have I listed them in the chronological order they would have been used? DVCITIS DUCITIS DŪCITIS Would the C have been pronounced with a hard 'K', or a 'CH'...
11
votes
3answers
3k views

Is Thomas Hobbes' translation of “nosce te ipsum” as “read thyself” valid?

In the introduction to the original, English version of Leviathan, Thomas Hobbes says: … there is another saying not of late understood, by which they might learn truly to read one another,...
9
votes
1answer
239 views

What's the best way to translate “de Hercule famam acceperat”?

I'm translating the text: Pluto, qui de Hercule famam acceperat, eum benigne excepit (Fabulae Faciles, 53) I chose to translate it as "Pluto, who had heard stories about Hercules, received ...
18
votes
2answers
3k views

When did 'ph' start to be pronounced like 'f'?

I learned from Nathaniel's answer to my previous question that 'ch', 'th' and 'ph' were aspirated voiceless stops in classical Latin. In my experience many contemporary speakers of Latin pronounce 'ph'...
13
votes
1answer
3k views

Were 'th' and 'ch' aspirated in classical Latin?

I have been taught that 'th' and 'ch' were pronounced just like 't' and 'c' in classical Latin, with no aspiration. The answer to this earlier question confirms that 't' and 'c' had indeed little or ...
10
votes
2answers
27k views

What is meant by the expression 'Sic Transit Gloria Mundi'?

The phrase is used when in the ceremony of assigning a new pope, and can be interpreted in many ways. A translation would be: "So pass the worldly glories." How would you interpret its meaning, ...
16
votes
1answer
343 views

Which Roman Numerals were used to express extremely large numbers in Classical Latin?

According to Wikipedia, there are two notable ways to render large numbers, reaching up to hundreds of thousands and higher: apostrophus and vinculum. The first uses a system of expanding rings, so ...
11
votes
3answers
1k views

How to express a time exactly on the hour?

I would like to express the following times in Latin: "at four o'clock sharp" "every hour, on the hour" I want to emphasize that the event takes place exactly on the hour. My dictionaries do not ...
13
votes
1answer
1k views

Were voiceless stops (p, t, c, qu) aspirated in Classical Latin?

In English, the voiceless stops/plosives (p, t, k, "hard" c) are aspirated, particularly when beginning a word. That is, speakers release a burst of air when saying pop, tea, kaluha, or coffee (put ...
17
votes
2answers
804 views

Why is the “u” in “nuntius” and “nuntiare” long by exception?

First of all, a warm hello to all the users here! I was recently thinking about the pronunciation of nūntius and nūntiāre along with its derivatives (such as prōnūntiāre). According to "Latin for ...
12
votes
1answer
1k views

Old vs Classical latins

In my research I found something about an old latin and that that is where the locative case comes from. So I clicked on the old latin page, and surprise, it's just an older version of latin. So is ...

15 30 50 per page
1
81 82
83
84 85
88