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7
votes
2answers
279 views

Ambiguities in De Bello Gallico 1.3.3

There are a couple words and phrases which are ambiguous to me in Caesar's De Bello Gallico, 1.3.3. I'll reproduce the text, here, which I got from the Perseus digital library. Ad eas res ...
3
votes
1answer
196 views

How did I misunderstand the Latin 'consisto' in interpreting 'X consists in Y'?

I am trying to understand the English phrase "X consists in Y" with help of and in comparison to the Latin verb consistere. In English, 1 means "X contains Y", but from the Latin point of view ...
8
votes
2answers
250 views

Can you please translate these paragraphs (13th & 14th century)?

My dad found these two texts in a book whose title I don't know. For a guess of the origin, see below. 13th century: sed libera, mais delivre nous, sire, a malo, de tout mal et de cruel martire ...
5
votes
1answer
51 views

How to search for neuters ending in -tus?

For reasons of rhyming I sometimes need to search for Latin words with specific kinds of endings. Translating songs to Latin is a hobby that seems to inevitably lead to this need. I would like to ...
10
votes
1answer
249 views

Mediaeval Latin adopted the Greek word 'grapheus' as '-gravius' (which led to Dutch/German 'graaf/Graf', “count”); where and when did this happen?

Philippa (2003–2009) says about the Dutch word graaf, "count", that it came from Greek grapheus "writer/scribe", through Mediaeval Latin -gravius, "royal administrative ...
11
votes
1answer
4k views

Why did Roman children call their father 'tata' instead of 'pappa'?

I was reading a text from Hans H. Øberg, and I saw in the text the following sentences: Noli dicere 'tatam' et 'mammam', Iuliola! Ea nomina a te audire nolumus. Ita loquuntur parvuli infantes, nec ...
13
votes
1answer
159 views

How to tell when an inscription is post-classical?

When traveling in Europe, I occasionally come across Latin inscriptions. Their ages vary greatly, and I would like to get some tools for quickly estimating their age. How can I tell if an inscription ...
7
votes
1answer
162 views

What is the difference between emere and coemere?

I was reading Caesar's De Bello Gallico 1.3.1, and I was curious why he used the word coemere when emere also seemed possible; which got me wondering, what exactly is the difference between the two ...
4
votes
3answers
555 views

Why is the Greek definite article τη duplicated in this sentence?

I was translating a simplified version of Two Friends and a Bear, one of Aesop's fables, listed as #65 in the Perry Index. The text begins with the sentence: Δύο φίλοι τῇ ὁδῷ τῇ εἰς τὴν χώραν ...
8
votes
1answer
338 views

What are your views on inventing place-names in Latin?

This is a kind of extension to the question about -landia as a proper way of forming a country's Latin name. Correspondents, usually helpful, comment on my Latin syntax and, ever seeking improvement, ...
10
votes
2answers
463 views

Is “-landia” good Latin?

Several Latin names of modern countries end in -landia if the corresponding English name ends in -land: Islandia, Nederlandia, Irlandia, Thailandia, Finlandia (also Finnia). England has a much older ...
4
votes
0answers
70 views

Did the Romans have sarcasm? [duplicate]

Do we have any evidence of the use of sarcasm to create humor/insults in Latin - that is, intentional stress changes of words in order to imply falsehood of the statement being made?
4
votes
0answers
140 views

How to instruct people fluent in English to pronounce Latin?

Sometimes people with little or no knowledge of Latin end up having or wanting to use it. I am typically willing to help and I have learned how to do it effectively with Finns. But how should I ...
0
votes
1answer
695 views

What does the ''Tempus Praeteritum'' mean?

I've got a test tomorrow and I have to learn the list of "Tempus praeteritum". The problem is, that I don't know what it means and where it's used for. Can anybody help me?
8
votes
1answer
269 views

How to translate the Finnish “muka”?

I would like to know how to translate the Finnish particle or adverb "muka" or "mukamas" into Latin. Pitkäranta's Finnish–Latin–Finnish dictionary offers the translations ut dicitur, ...
4
votes
2answers
313 views

Gemination after stressed vowel

Sometimes I hear people geminate consonants after stressed vowels in speech. For example, amāta might be pronounced as amātta. I have not heard enough to tell if this gemination is ...
6
votes
1answer
138 views

Can adjectives describe any noun in a sentence?

As long as the adjective matches its noun in case, number, and gender, is it possible to move the adjective anywhere in a sentence, even outside of prepositional phrases and subordinating or ...
8
votes
1answer
224 views

Ovid: “nimis ex vero nunc tibi nomen erit”

In Ovid Amores 3.9, the elegy for Tibullus, we read: flebilis indignos, Elegeiia, solve capillos! a! nimis ex vero nunc tibi nomen erit My literal translation: "Tearful, loosen your undeserving ...
8
votes
1answer
124 views

“Hunt deer with bows, with snares: rabbits,” or referencing a verb from a previous clause

I've been trying to translate the following phrase into Latin: Hunt deer with bows, with snares: rabbits. With my limited grasp of Latin, I have come to this result: Vēnāre cervas arcubus, ...
7
votes
2answers
446 views

Why does Ago become agit, agitis, agis, etc? [conjugate with an *i*?]

I am working on word endings in Latin, and I came across the word Ago. And I was looking at the different conjugations for this word and it did not make sense to me. Observe: Endings are: ...
8
votes
1answer
525 views

How to distinguish “lecturer” and “reader” in Latin?

Universities in the UK have two distinct titles (among others): "lecturer" and "reader". A reader is more senior than a lecturer but both are below a professor. The US (rough?) equivalents are "...
6
votes
1answer
128 views

Is it idiomatic Latin to paraphrase a condition using an imperative plus a future indicative?

In English, there's a common construction which consists of two coordinated clauses, the first with an imperative verb, the second with a future-tense verb: Take the first left and you'll find my ...
4
votes
1answer
76 views

Divide and be conquered

Sometimes, when you divide something into many pieces, the many pieces overwhelm you, like what happened to Mickey Mouse in Fantasia. This suggests a variation on divide et vinces: Divide et ...
6
votes
1answer
3k views

Libera te tutemet ex inferis vs. Libera temet [ipsum] ab inferis?

In a movie (Event Horizon, spoilers ahead), you have this Latin phrase they think they heard and what it ends up being : Liberate me... Libera te tutemet (ex inferis). There's always the ...
5
votes
2answers
284 views

Sapiens: tasty or smart?

The verb sapere can mean tasting like something or having a sense of taste. The latter can be understood figuratively close to "to be wise or sensible". Dictionaries list the participle sapiens ...
8
votes
1answer
146 views

Please briefly define “futurum instans”

I am writing a book, quoting from Aune: “There are several instances in Revelation of this use of ἔρχεται as futurum instans…” Note that Aune uses the term “futurum instans” for Greek, not ...
11
votes
2answers
10k views

Difference between super and supra?

Is there a difference in meaning between super and supra (both with accusative)? Would one indicate motion and the other one position?
8
votes
3answers
646 views

How to say “elämä kantaa” or “life will prevail”?

How can one translate the Finnish phrase "elämä kantaa" or "elämä voittaa" to Latin? The literal English translations are "life carries" and "life wins". The first phrase means roughly "even in hard ...
3
votes
1answer
75 views

What underlying semantic notions connect 'rēs' to 'reus'?

Wiktionary asserts the etymon of reus as rēs. But how might have 'rēs' shifted semantically to mean 'reus'? My conjecture: If I ignore the morality and subjectivity of something 'guilty', then one ...
1
vote
1answer
99 views

Deriving lactuca from lac

The word lactuca refers to lettuce, and Lactuca sativa is the scientific name. Some of the plants in this genus seem to contain some kind of milky liquid which must be the reason for deriving the word ...
3
votes
1answer
5k views

Why is “Bonam Fortunam” the correct way to wish someone good fortune instead of “Bona Fortuna”?

I remember being told this by a Latin teacher, but I have since forgotten the details. Why should I use the accusative case instead of the nominative here?
6
votes
1answer
168 views

Toilet paper orientation

Toilet paper orientation is the source of some amount of debate, and it turns out it even has a dedicated Wikipedia page. For reasons partly beyond my comprehension, I would like to describe this ...
4
votes
1answer
229 views

“Nequidquam seros exercet noctua cantus”: what is the Latin onomatopoeia for the owl's hoot?

In the 16th century, Robert et Antoine Lechevallier d'Aigneaux made a famous translation of Virgil's Aeneid which was seemingly praised in the French world; they also translated the Georgics including ...
8
votes
1answer
121 views

Gender and number in medieval composite active perfect

I am not sure of correct terminology, but let me call the medieval perfect tenses like amatum habeo — as opposed to the classical amavi — the "composite active perfect". One would expect ...
6
votes
2answers
116 views

How to make sense of this standalone infinitive? (Metamorphoses 1.601—603)

For starters, I haven't finished translating this short passage yet, so I would be grateful if you refrain from giving the full translation. (And if it's hard to answer the question without doing so, ...
5
votes
2answers
155 views

Aurora Natalis or Aurora Natalicus?

I have practically no experience with Latin, but from what I understand Aurora Borealis roughly means northern dawn, and Aurora Australis roughly means southern dawn. What would be the equivalent way ...
8
votes
1answer
646 views

Online drills for Keller and Russell's Learn to Read Latin?

I'm currently teaching with Keller and Russell's Learn to Read Latin. I have a vague memory that there exists, or used to exist, a website with drills and exercises that are specifically keyed to the ...
6
votes
1answer
124 views

Is the coordinating conjunction necessary in a parallel series of terms?

I just finished translating line 6 of Bellum Gallicum, Book I Ch. I, and the absence of a coordinating conjunction at the end made me wonder. Belgae ab extremis Galliae finibus oriuntur, pertinent ad ...
6
votes
3answers
381 views

Length of i in Vergilius' “ferentis”

In the famous line "quicquid id est timeo Danaos et dona ferentis" Vergilius uses an older plural accusative form ferentis instead of ferentes. (It is unimportant here whether quicquid or quidquid is ...
13
votes
4answers
1k views

French and Latin “s'il te/vous plaît”

The phrases si tibi placet and si vobis placet can be found in Latin literature, but they are not particularly common. At least superficially they correspond to the French "s'il te plaît" and "s'il ...
10
votes
1answer
1k views

A good Latin word for “point”

I am looking for a Latin word for "point" to be used like this: I see your point. I hope this example gets the point across. There is no point in peeling a banana. Good point! There probably is no ...
6
votes
2answers
451 views

What do the words “tunc tantum” mean together?

Pope Francis tweeted on September 21st, Sermonem confero cum aliquo sincerum tunc tantum agnosco illum esse donum Dei mihique aliquid pretiosum dicturum. Here is my translation. (Credits to Keith ...
7
votes
3answers
2k views

Was there a word which meant roughly the same thing as “nerd” or “geek” does today?

...That is, a word meaning someone with deep and specialized knowledge, and could be used either as a badge of pride: I'm a huge Linux nerd. I helped reoptimize some of the photonal decalcifiers ...
8
votes
1answer
190 views

Is there a relation between ascendo and accendo?

I have always learnt that ascendo means to go up and accendo means to ignite. Do they even originate from the same word and if so how have they come to be as they are?
7
votes
1answer
137 views

sentence in Livy 33/LLPSI

Chapter 50 of Lingua Latina per sē illustrāta: Rōma Æterna contains this from Livy 33: . . . mājus gaudium fuit quam quod ūniversum hominēs acciperent. What is ūniversum doing here? Its ending ...
12
votes
2answers
1k views

How to use immo?

What does the word immo really mean and how can I use it? I read this and this dictionary entry, and I was left confused. Some of the uses I can understand, but some I cannot. Either I do not have ...
28
votes
4answers
67k views

How do you say “yes” and “no” in Classical Latin?

I'm wondering how the Romans would have said "yes" as in "yes please" or "no" as in "no thank you". I don't know if they would have said it exactly like that, but what would they have said if they had ...
6
votes
2answers
1k views

What is the pronunciation of O with macron and breve?

I found an Indo-European root, nō̆-men-, in the free dictionary. I know both macron and breve mean the length of vowels. And the Latin word, nōmen, has a long ō. However, how should I pronounce the ...
14
votes
2answers
3k views

What do animals say in classical Latin?

It is well known that the way animals "speak" is amusingly different in different languages. (See lion below.) This makes it hard to guess what kinds of words the Romans would have put in the mouths ...
8
votes
2answers
1k views

On the Internet, nobody knows you're a dog

I would like to know whether the adage above could be translated into Latin to make it sound more profound. The user Sam K has suggested the following translation: In interneto, nemo scit te canem ...

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