All Questions

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
13
votes
1answer
3k views

Does anyone learn Latin as a native language?

I am interested in finding out if any Latin enthusiasts speak Latin to their children, so that the children grow up with Latin as one of their native languages. If yes, can any description of their ...
10
votes
1answer
554 views

Victorum: victus or victor

The (masculine) plural genitive of both the participle victus and the derived noun victor is victorum. If I write, for example, uxores victorum infelices erant, it is unclear which wives were unhappy. ...
2
votes
1answer
157 views

Simple translation from Polish and English to Latin

I have totally no clue about Latin language, but I need translation for the title to my music project. The answer is not "Magnum Opus Dei". I would like to know what's in Latin: Polish - Wielkie ...
11
votes
1answer
1k views

Which animal names have grammatical gender, and which have common gender?

In Allen & Greenough, §34, I see a short discussion on the gender of animal names: Many nouns may be either masculine or feminine, according to the sex of the object. These are said to be of ...
9
votes
1answer
65 views

Ørberg/Eutropius “potestátés majórés”

In Róma Æterna, the second volume of Ørberg's Lingua Latína per sé illustráta, in a chapter adapted from Eutropius I.9–III.6, on page 181 we find the following sentences: Verum dignitás ...
5
votes
1answer
424 views

Soli Deo gloria: sol or solus?

In the phrase Soli Deo gloria one can read soli in two different ways: If it is solus, the phrase means "glory only to the God" or "glory to the only God". If it is sol, the phrase means "glory to ...
8
votes
1answer
3k views

How do you convert a noun to an adjective in Latin?

I'm thinking that a houseguest who stays on your couch should be something like hospes lectuli. But that sounds more like a guest invited by your couch, which is silly. In my non-expert understanding ...
7
votes
2answers
251 views

What did the Council of Braga (~560) say about singing psalms in church?

The First Council of Braga was a meeting of eight bishops that took place around AD 560. They produced a number of decrees, one of which relates to the type of songs that could be sung in church. ...
7
votes
2answers
229 views

How to refer to reserve military?

What would be an idiomatic Latin way to refer to reserve military? I mean troops that have previously served and have returned to civilian life but can be called back on duty. I would much prefer ...
8
votes
1answer
537 views

New devotional title to the Virgin Mary in Latin

A friend of mine is completing a small statue of the Virgin Mary under the new title of Our Lady, Turner of Hearts. As it turns out, he would like to put the inscription of "Our Lady, Turner of Hearts,...
6
votes
2answers
357 views

Is mensa somehow derived from mens?

"Mens" means mind, and "Mensa" is the club for geniuses. I follow so far. But "mensa" also means "table." How would that relate to the meaning in the previous paragraph? Does a table have a ...
7
votes
1answer
218 views

Is the noun Bonum, -i simply a substantive of the adjective Bonus, -a -um?

The noun Bonum ("a good thing") seems to have taken on a life of its own as a distinct word in Latin usage. In derivation and meaning, is this simply a neuter substantive of the adjective Bonus ("...
7
votes
2answers
288 views

Comparing quicumque, quilibet, quisquis, quivis

The pronouns quicumque, quilibet, quisquis and quivis have a somewhat similar meaning, roughly "anyone". What exactly are their differences? The dictionary entries I have seen do not provide a clear ...
9
votes
2answers
399 views

Was the middle finger obscene in Ancient Rome?

I was recently reading a work where I became (re)acquainted with the fact that the middle finger can be referred to as the digitus impudicus -- the "shameful finger" -- in Latin. My question is ...
10
votes
1answer
829 views

Does any historical Latin-based sign language exist?

Historically, has there ever been a "Latin Sign Language"? Perhaps the Romans developed one, or maybe the Catholic Church did so at some point? Perhaps suggesting "no," Wikipedia's list doesn't seem ...
13
votes
1answer
357 views

Use of ß (“eszett”) in Latin text

I am translating a medical text from the late 16th century. The author is Swiss. The text uses the ß character (like the German eszett). Example: toti amplißimo conseßui Is this character being ...
2
votes
1answer
602 views

Latin Root Word and Meaning of Imperative and Declarative

What are the Latin root words for the English words "imperative" and "declarative"? What are their respective meanings?
3
votes
1answer
68 views

Agent of passive sentence in accusative

In the following clause the agent is in the accusative, not ablative. Why? quod Civitas Aquilegensis et oppida Sancti Viti A. et Sancti Danielis in dicta patria consistentia cum omnibus eorum ...
16
votes
2answers
875 views

What is the history of scientific Latin?

Scientists up until the mid-19th century (e.g., Gauss) would frequently write scientific works in Latin. What sort of Latin would it be considered? Would Gauss's writings, for example, be considered ...
14
votes
2answers
3k views

What is the difference between “ac” (or “atque”) and “et”?

What is the difference between ac (or atque) and et? And how do I know when to use atque instead of just ac? It seems that ac "binds more tightly" than et. Is this true? Or is the difference between ...
8
votes
4answers
250 views

In contemporary spoken Latin, do people mark the 1st-declension ablative case?

In contemporary spoken Latin, such as (I think) occurs among canon lawyers in the Vatican and at Latin-only conventicula, do people clearly lengthen the -ā at the end of first-declension nouns in the ...
4
votes
2answers
113 views

Is the unmarked 1st-declension ablative in writing ever jarring or confusing?

Occasionally while reading, I've mistaken a first-declension ablative for a nominative, or vice versa,* and gotten confused for a moment until I sorted it out. Both appear the same in writing, of ...
8
votes
1answer
297 views

“Argumentum ad” vs. “argumentum a”

Is there a difference in meaning between argumentum ad and argumentum a? Does the latter even have authoritative usage in Latin?* Here are some samples that I've found, not always from authoritative ...
3
votes
1answer
92 views

Stem for derivatives like figura, statura and cultura

I learned in a recent question that derived nouns like figura, statura and cultura do not always look like the future participle but are actually formed from a different stem. Examples of differences: ...
9
votes
2answers
817 views

The difference between tum and tunc

Although these two words are obviously closely related (I believe tunc = tum + ce), I would like to know whether they are usually interchangeable and the meaning differences that exist between them. ...
7
votes
1answer
563 views

Fieri potest with final ut or explicative quod

Suppose I want to say: It can happen that my horse dies. I do not want to say "my horse can die", but I want to keep this structure where the thing that happens is in a subordinate clause. ...
9
votes
2answers
131 views

Same ending of “Mediolanensis” in “Archiepiscopus Mediolanensis” and “Archidioecesis Mediolanensis”

Why is the ending of Mediolanensis in Archiepiscopus Mediolanensis and Archidioecesis Mediolanensis the same even though the former noun is male and the latter female?
9
votes
1answer
209 views

In what case is “Venetiarum” in “Patriarchatus Venetiarum”?

Also, is it a noun or an adjective? What's the nominative? (moved second question here) Sorry, I'm a total n00b and checked all sorts of declension tables but I just can't figure this one out.
9
votes
1answer
165 views

Is cultura a future participle?

Some nouns derived from verbs look like future participles: cultura from colere, sepultura from sepelire, scriptura from scribere… These do not have a future meaning, but are merely names for ...
7
votes
1answer
512 views

“Ladies and gentlemen”

Is there a Latin phrase that could be used like "ladies and gentlemen" when addressing a large audience but without commenting the circumstances or identities of the people involved? In special cases ...
2
votes
3answers
637 views

Street Address in Latin

How do you say "address" as in a street address in Latin? E.g.: My address is 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.
9
votes
2answers
636 views

What is close combat in Latin?

I checked a couple of dictionaries, but I found no translation for "close combat". I am looking for an expression for fighting close to one's enemy as opposed to using long distance weaponry. What ...
9
votes
2answers
448 views

“Initium doctrinae sit consideratio nominis”

I'm looking for a Latin phrase for starting your exposition by explaining the terms, i.e. its title. I believe the quote is "initium doctrinae sit consideratio nominis," but I'm not sure that that's ...
7
votes
1answer
170 views

Verb forms after “tamquam si”

In Suetonius's Vita Horati, a letter from Augustus to Horace is quoted, which includes the sentence: Sume tibi aliquid iuris apud me, tamquam si convictor mihi fueris. The Loeb translation gives: "...
6
votes
0answers
189 views

“Purissimum penem” in Suetonius's Life of Horace

Suetonius, in his Vita Horati, reports that the emperor Augustus jokingly referred to Horace as a purissimus penis: Praeterea saepe eum inter alios iocos purissimum penem et homuncionem ...
6
votes
1answer
333 views

Where did the missing forms of nemo go?

The pronoun nemo is usually said to have only nominative, accusative and dative forms (nemo, neminem, nemini). The other forms, including plural, are easy to form, since nemo seems to come from ne+...
11
votes
1answer
4k views

Latin translation for the Serenity Prayer?

I'm looking for the latin translation of the Serenity Prayer: God, Grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, The courage to change the things I can, And the wisdom to know ...
6
votes
3answers
536 views

Using the -tim suffix

I am looking for some guidelines for using the -tim suffix in the sense "one by one". Some examples: guttatim, nominatim, paul(l)atim, syllabatim, viritim. (It seems that this is not the only use of ...
18
votes
3answers
5k views

What are the Latin names for modern countries?

With the Olympics starting this week, I got interested in all the countries of the world. Naturally, I would like to know the Latin names for modern countries. I have only been able to find a few ...
7
votes
1answer
726 views

Origins of the expression “mea culpa”?

What are the origins of the expression "mea culpa, mea culpa, mea culpa". I have heard one of my past math professors say this, and was wondering. Thanks.
10
votes
1answer
335 views

What's the the Latin word for a government minister / secretary?

According to Wikipedia, the definition of a government minister is: A minister is a politician who holds significant public office in a national or regional government, making and implementing ...
10
votes
2answers
522 views

How to answer a question?

Respondere looks like a good verb for answering, but how can I say "to answer a question"? I failed to find an answer by looking at dictionaries. These options come to mind: quaestionem respondere in ...
13
votes
1answer
401 views

Wordplay with “Vox Populi” (populus, m vs. populus, f)

Say I want to mock up the idiom "Vox Populi" using not "populus" (m, people) but "populus" (f, poplar tree). Meaning something like "the sound of the poplar leaves rustling". Do I have a way to ...
15
votes
1answer
1k views

How does forem compare to essem?

The verb esse has two sets of imperfect conjunctive forms: essem, esses, esset… and forem, fores, foret… What is the difference between these two, in meaning and in use? Are there cases ...
6
votes
1answer
294 views

Spoken Classical Latin

I'm not sure whether this question is allowed, but I'm preparing for a course starting in September. The last time I heard Latin spoken was about 50 years ago at school, and that was Church or ...
15
votes
1answer
677 views

Omnia vincit amor: vincere or vincire?

The phrase omnia vincit amor (from Vergilius' tenth Ecloga; see full text in Latin and English) is typically translated as "love conquers everything". However, vincit can come from either vincere (to ...
12
votes
3answers
438 views

How to resolve ambiguity with reflexive pronouns

A comment to an answer of this question mentions that ambiguity can arise with a reflexive pronoun when both the independent clause and the clause with the reflexive pronoun have third-person subjects....
8
votes
1answer
104 views

How to describe ministers in Latin?

I want to talk about different ministers in a government in Latin. Minister and ministra are good words for a minister, but how to say "minister of justice and employment" and "minister of economic ...
9
votes
1answer
307 views

When to use a genitive pronoun instead of a possessive adjective

The genitive form of the personal pronouns (e.g. mei, tui, nostri, nostrum, etc.) seem to occur fairly often in the following contexts: Partitive genitive: to indicate a part of some whole. Quis ...
10
votes
1answer
803 views

Term for the water/wine ratio chooser?

What's the Latin word for the person at cena who decided whether more or less water was added to the wine to keep the party going steadily?

15 30 50 per page
1
73 74
75
76 77
85