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10
votes
3answers
303 views

For the sake of the plot

In my Sanskrit dictionary, the Latin phrase metri causa ("for the sake of the metre") is used to alert the reader to forms which may be used irregularly in order to fit the metre. For example, in the ...
5
votes
1answer
714 views

The meaning of common ground in appear/prepare

I have noticed that appear reduces to a Latin parere appear (v.) Look up appear at Dictionary.com late 13c., "to come into view," from stem of Old French aparoir (12c., Modern French apparoir) "...
6
votes
2answers
446 views

How does this phrase for most decorated sportsperson translate?

My secondary (middle and high) school has a trophy awarded to the most decorated sportsperson at sports day. From my vague memories, the trophy, and its subsequent winner, are called the Victor ...
5
votes
1answer
153 views

How to say “that can be arranged”?

The phrase "that can be arranged" can be useful, and I would like to know an idiomatic way to put it in Latin. This phrase could be a response to "can we meet tomorrow at ten?", "I'd like to eat ...
12
votes
3answers
343 views

Help with Latin translation from a 17th century ecclesiastical Latin book

The book is Panoplia Clericalis, and the passage I'm having difficulty with (which I suspect is much easier than I think) is, from page 602: De colorum mixtione, qui differunt, ex varia eorum ...
15
votes
2answers
462 views

Why are Greek nouns in -ον, -ος transliterated in Latin as -um, -us?

Although there are numerous conventions that appear to be followed when borrowing words from Greek to English, an especially noticeable one is the change made to the endings of 2nd declension nouns, ...
16
votes
2answers
194 views

Is there a difference between 'a' and 'de' when the meaning is 'from'?

The Latin preposition de takes an ablative object and has several different translations including 'about', 'of', 'down from' and 'from'. The preposition a/ab also has multiple meanings including '...
7
votes
1answer
162 views

Does the letter “X” at the end of a line make that syllable long?

In scansion, a vowel is long by position if there are two or more consonants between it and the next vowel. Can a vowel be long by position if it ends a line and there is no next vowel? E.g. is the "...
7
votes
1answer
109 views

Why does Cicero in his In Verrem pretend he has not heard of Praxiteles before?

In Cicero In Verrem, II, iv, 4, unum Cupidinis marmoreum Praxiteli; nimirum didici etiam, dum in istum inquiro, artificum nomina. idem, opinor, artifex eiusdem modi Cupidinem fecit illum qui est ...
6
votes
1answer
71 views

“Ut” in Livy XXI via LLpsi

In an excerpt from Livy XXI, Lingua Latina per se illustrata has this: . . . Haud ferme plures Saguntini cadebant quam Pœni. Ut vero Hannibal ipse, dum murum incautius subit, tragula graviter ictus ...
7
votes
1answer
296 views

What is the history of the perfect active participle in Latin?

From this answer and Allen & Greenough §493, I understand that Latin does not have a perfect active participle. But on Wiktionary, I see the following usage note in the entry on the suffix -vus: ...
9
votes
1answer
249 views

Active verbs with passive meanings

Every beginning Latin-learner is familiar with the idea of deponent verbs: verbs that have passive forms but active meanings. I am curious about a small subset of Latin verbs that aren't just ...
5
votes
1answer
196 views

Latin names of Cambridge terms

The academic year at the University Cambridge consists of three terms: Michaelmas, Lent and Easter. For more details, consult the term date pages of the university. What are these terms called in ...
14
votes
1answer
932 views

When were macrons first used to mark Latin text?

A macron is a diacritical mark, which, in modern Latin texts, is sometimes used to mark a long vowel: ā, ē, ī, ō, ū, ȳ. From Roman uses of diacritical marks, I understand that the ancient Romans did ...
8
votes
1answer
195 views

Negativus and positivus

When, if ever, did the adjectives negativus and positivus evolve into an antonym pair like the English "negative" and "positive", and how did positivus get this meaning? Deriving negativus from the ...
9
votes
2answers
592 views

Hit the lamb with the flower

Page 18 of "Prosodic Phrasing in Adolescents with High-Functioning Autism" by Jessica Mayo, a doctoral dissertation that has nothing to do with Latin (but watch for the relevance, it's coming), ...
7
votes
1answer
302 views

Are nocte and noctu interchangeable?

The regular ablative of nox is nocte. At least in the temporal sense noctu is a synonym of nocte. Are nocte and noctu fully interchangeable as temporal expressions? In particular, can I attach ...
5
votes
1answer
449 views

What is a phrase like “annus horribilis” but meaning a year of change?

What is a Latin phrase similar to "annus horribilis" meaning a year of change, as in a year where everything changes? For example - a year in which I moved across the country, totally changed job etc ...
13
votes
5answers
408 views

How do you show an infinitive for reason?

For instance, if you say, "I came here to eat," or "We want something good to eat," you are using the infinitive "to eat" to express reason or purpose. How do translate something like this in Latin?
6
votes
1answer
142 views

Are pro and prae etymologically related?

Pro and prae are somewhat similar in meaning and form. De Vaan isn't clear about whether they are related; he mentions Proto-Indo-European roots *proH or *pro, and *pre-h2i, respectively. Could it be ...
5
votes
1answer
189 views

What does this phrase from Roger Eno's “Lost in Translation” mean?

They are the words to the hauntingly beautiful title song in Roger Eno's "Lost in Translation" CD ca. 1995: Discontentus Sentimentum Listigatus Exocentum Either maybe it's a joke (and the words ...
7
votes
0answers
105 views

When did acronyms first appear?

Acronyms are abbreviations that are read as whole words rather than letter by letter — or in other words, they are words formed from initials of a phrase. "NATO" and "laser" are two examples. I ...
5
votes
1answer
342 views

When do I use the gerundive vs. participle forms of a verb in Latin?

When do I use the gerundive vs. participle forms of a verb in Latin?
13
votes
1answer
2k views

Does anyone learn Latin as a native language?

I am interested in finding out if any Latin enthusiasts speak Latin to their children, so that the children grow up with Latin as one of their native languages. If yes, can any description of their ...
10
votes
1answer
545 views

Victorum: victus or victor

The (masculine) plural genitive of both the participle victus and the derived noun victor is victorum. If I write, for example, uxores victorum infelices erant, it is unclear which wives were unhappy. ...
2
votes
1answer
157 views

Simple translation from Polish and English to Latin

I have totally no clue about Latin language, but I need translation for the title to my music project. The answer is not "Magnum Opus Dei". I would like to know what's in Latin: Polish - Wielkie ...
11
votes
1answer
1k views

Which animal names have grammatical gender, and which have common gender?

In Allen & Greenough, §34, I see a short discussion on the gender of animal names: Many nouns may be either masculine or feminine, according to the sex of the object. These are said to be of ...
9
votes
1answer
64 views

Ørberg/Eutropius “potestátés majórés”

In Róma Æterna, the second volume of Ørberg's Lingua Latína per sé illustráta, in a chapter adapted from Eutropius I.9–III.6, on page 181 we find the following sentences: Verum dignitás ...
5
votes
1answer
415 views

Soli Deo gloria: sol or solus?

In the phrase Soli Deo gloria one can read soli in two different ways: If it is solus, the phrase means "glory only to the God" or "glory to the only God". If it is sol, the phrase means "glory to ...
8
votes
1answer
2k views

How do you convert a noun to an adjective in Latin?

I'm thinking that a houseguest who stays on your couch should be something like hospes lectuli. But that sounds more like a guest invited by your couch, which is silly. In my non-expert understanding ...
7
votes
2answers
248 views

What did the Council of Braga (~560) say about singing psalms in church?

The First Council of Braga was a meeting of eight bishops that took place around AD 560. They produced a number of decrees, one of which relates to the type of songs that could be sung in church. ...
7
votes
2answers
228 views

How to refer to reserve military?

What would be an idiomatic Latin way to refer to reserve military? I mean troops that have previously served and have returned to civilian life but can be called back on duty. I would much prefer ...
8
votes
1answer
533 views

New devotional title to the Virgin Mary in Latin

A friend of mine is completing a small statue of the Virgin Mary under the new title of Our Lady, Turner of Hearts. As it turns out, he would like to put the inscription of "Our Lady, Turner of Hearts,...
6
votes
2answers
340 views

Is mensa somehow derived from mens?

"Mens" means mind, and "Mensa" is the club for geniuses. I follow so far. But "mensa" also means "table." How would that relate to the meaning in the previous paragraph? Does a table have a ...
7
votes
1answer
214 views

Is the noun Bonum, -i simply a substantive of the adjective Bonus, -a -um?

The noun Bonum ("a good thing") seems to have taken on a life of its own as a distinct word in Latin usage. In derivation and meaning, is this simply a neuter substantive of the adjective Bonus ("...
7
votes
2answers
275 views

Comparing quicumque, quilibet, quisquis, quivis

The pronouns quicumque, quilibet, quisquis and quivis have a somewhat similar meaning, roughly "anyone". What exactly are their differences? The dictionary entries I have seen do not provide a clear ...
9
votes
2answers
391 views

Was the middle finger obscene in Ancient Rome?

I was recently reading a work where I became (re)acquainted with the fact that the middle finger can be referred to as the digitus impudicus -- the "shameful finger" -- in Latin. My question is ...
10
votes
1answer
807 views

Does any historical Latin-based sign language exist?

Historically, has there ever been a "Latin Sign Language"? Perhaps the Romans developed one, or maybe the Catholic Church did so at some point? Perhaps suggesting "no," Wikipedia's list doesn't seem ...
13
votes
1answer
348 views

Use of ß (“eszett”) in Latin text

I am translating a medical text from the late 16th century. The author is Swiss. The text uses the ß character (like the German eszett). Example: toti amplißimo conseßui Is this character being ...
2
votes
1answer
589 views

Latin Root Word and Meaning of Imperative and Declarative

What are the Latin root words for the English words "imperative" and "declarative"? What are their respective meanings?
3
votes
1answer
68 views

Agent of passive sentence in accusative

In the following clause the agent is in the accusative, not ablative. Why? quod Civitas Aquilegensis et oppida Sancti Viti A. et Sancti Danielis in dicta patria consistentia cum omnibus eorum ...
16
votes
2answers
854 views

What is the history of scientific Latin?

Scientists up until the mid-19th century (e.g., Gauss) would frequently write scientific works in Latin. What sort of Latin would it be considered? Would Gauss's writings, for example, be considered ...
14
votes
2answers
3k views

What is the difference between “ac” (or “atque”) and “et”?

What is the difference between ac (or atque) and et? And how do I know when to use atque instead of just ac? It seems that ac "binds more tightly" than et. Is this true? Or is the difference between ...
8
votes
4answers
245 views

In contemporary spoken Latin, do people mark the 1st-declension ablative case?

In contemporary spoken Latin, such as (I think) occurs among canon lawyers in the Vatican and at Latin-only conventicula, do people clearly lengthen the -ā at the end of first-declension nouns in the ...
4
votes
2answers
111 views

Is the unmarked 1st-declension ablative in writing ever jarring or confusing?

Occasionally while reading, I've mistaken a first-declension ablative for a nominative, or vice versa,* and gotten confused for a moment until I sorted it out. Both appear the same in writing, of ...
8
votes
1answer
294 views

“Argumentum ad” vs. “argumentum a”

Is there a difference in meaning between argumentum ad and argumentum a? Does the latter even have authoritative usage in Latin?* Here are some samples that I've found, not always from authoritative ...
3
votes
1answer
92 views

Stem for derivatives like figura, statura and cultura

I learned in a recent question that derived nouns like figura, statura and cultura do not always look like the future participle but are actually formed from a different stem. Examples of differences: ...
9
votes
2answers
798 views

The difference between tum and tunc

Although these two words are obviously closely related (I believe tunc = tum + ce), I would like to know whether they are usually interchangeable and the meaning differences that exist between them. ...
7
votes
1answer
546 views

Fieri potest with final ut or explicative quod

Suppose I want to say: It can happen that my horse dies. I do not want to say "my horse can die", but I want to keep this structure where the thing that happens is in a subordinate clause. ...
9
votes
2answers
131 views

Same ending of “Mediolanensis” in “Archiepiscopus Mediolanensis” and “Archidioecesis Mediolanensis”

Why is the ending of Mediolanensis in Archiepiscopus Mediolanensis and Archidioecesis Mediolanensis the same even though the former noun is male and the latter female?

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