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6
votes
1answer
1k views

Inscriptions in statues along Via dei Fori Imperiali

I am interested in a couple of statues in Rome. They are on the north side of Via dei Fori Imperiali, between Via Cavour and Piazza Venezia. If my memory serves me well, they are of key figures in ...
6
votes
1answer
117 views

Can the adverb nunc be used in apposition?

For a textbook exercise, I translated this sentence from English into Latin. The terrified Callisto, now a wild animal, avoided men and beasts (animals). (Latin via Ovid) Here's my ...
12
votes
1answer
454 views

-eris, -oris, -uris?

Much to students' annoyance, nouns ending in -us can belong to either the second (servus), third (tempus), or fourth (circus) declensions. I understand the origin of the second and fourth: Proto-Indo-...
6
votes
4answers
333 views

What exactly was a pastillus?

The English word "pastille" (and related words in other languages) obviously derives from the Latin pastillus. I know pastillus had a similar purpose to today's pastille, and, if I remember what I ...
6
votes
3answers
2k views

How to pronounce the sequence “ti” when reading Latin

As Latin is a dead language, I imagine, people note pronounce it differently depending on in which county they are learning it. That said, I would like to know what IPA phoneme is commonly used to ...
11
votes
1answer
1k views

Genitive vs Ablative of Price

In Latin, worth or value can be expressed by the genitive or by the ablative. Here are some examples: Genitive Non pono utrique par pretium: pluris aestimo beneficium quam iniuriam. (Sen Ep. Mor. 81....
13
votes
2answers
11k views

Ars gratia artis

I would like to know the meaning of the following Latin expression, as well as a grammatical analysis of the individual words in this context: ARS GRATIA ARTIS as it appears in the following logo ...
12
votes
2answers
6k views

Breakfast, lunch, dinner?

How to translate 'breakfast', 'lunch', and 'dinner' into Latin? I gather cena is an adequate translation of 'dinner', but google translate produces many possibilities for 'breakfast' and 'lunch', and ...
10
votes
1answer
303 views

Interpretation of circumflex in a poem from 1621

A poem from 1621 contains one ô and one â. The ô is the interjection ô and the â is in the relative pronoun quâ. No circumflexes are used elsewhere in the poem. Does the circumflex (or caret or ...
4
votes
0answers
240 views

Differences between et and atque [duplicate]

What are the differences between et and atque? When should each be used? My current understanding is that they both mean and, although atque implies a slightly closer relationship.
7
votes
1answer
154 views

Short vowels in lucubrando

I came across a poem from 1621 written in Sapphic stanza. It contains this line: pervigil Christi, lucubrando sudans To scan that, the third word must be lŭcŭbrandŏ. L&S ...
5
votes
5answers
3k views

Translate “Sharing is Caring” into Latin

I have been trying to find an accurate translation of something my grandmother always said: "Sharing is Caring" or "To Share is to Care", into Latin. However online translators seem very inconsistent ...
18
votes
1answer
308 views

Can “si etiam” have the same meaning as “etiam si”?

As is well known, "etiam si" is a Latin conjunction that means "even if." Are there any examples in Classical or Medieval Latin in which reversing the word order and saying "si etiam" preserves the ...
11
votes
4answers
2k views

Is the complement of esse in nominative or accusative when esse is a subject?

Suppose I want to say something like "I like being a human". There are undoubtedly several ways to phrase that in Latin, but I want to do it so that it the subject is "to be a human". The complete ...
6
votes
1answer
408 views

What's the difference in sound between the letter η and the diphthong ει?

This question has been in the back of my mind for a while now. I'm curious to know, what's the difference in sound between the letter η and the diphthong ει? I would appreciate an answer in writing, ...
13
votes
3answers
657 views

Is qsd an abbreviation for a Latin phrase?

This is a bit cheeky, but I'm trying to find out the meaning of what may be an 18th century abbreviation of a Latin phrase (for an answer to a question in EL&U.SE). Since I have no Latin, I've ...
7
votes
2answers
207 views

“To be” and a commentator on Aquinas

Father David Burrell, a well-known philosopher and theologian who has written on Thomas Aquinas, has discussed Aquinas' view of God, or at least of what could or could not be properly said about God. ...
5
votes
1answer
119 views

Are there historical characters in Aeneis?

Are any of the characters in the main timeline of Aeneis (or Aeneid) historical, that is, known or strongly believed to have really existed? I want to exclude prophecies of later eras in Roman history....
4
votes
1answer
58 views

Can I use in and advenire together?

Is it grammatical to combine in and advenire to say, for example, in Finniam advenit? This sounds otherwise fine to me, but I'm slightly worried about mixing the prepositions in and ad so I want to ...
6
votes
1answer
136 views

How do originally Roman meters differ from Greek inheritance?

I have understood that many poetic meters were inherited to Latin from the Greeks. This includes, for example, the dactylic hexameter and the Sapphic meters. But the Romans did have their own poetic ...
7
votes
1answer
1k views

How to write “knowledge to all” in classical latin?

How to write "knowledge to all" in Classical Latin? Google translate gave me "In omni scientia". But I also had "Omnes enim scientiae" or "Omnis enim scientia" and a scholar gave me "Scientia per ...
8
votes
1answer
823 views

How do we know the quantity of vowels followed by several consonants?

Judging by dictionaries and grammars, we seem to know the length of almost every vowel in classical Latin. For word-final vowels and those followed by a single consonant, the length can be figured out ...
11
votes
1answer
226 views

Can you place “et” inside a prepositional phrase?

I became curious about this question as I was translating a passage written by a textbook author. The passage begins, Poeta Ovidius fabulam de dea Latona et de femina Niobe narrat. (Latin via Ovid)...
15
votes
4answers
2k views

Where to find an online Latin text corpus and what can I do with it?

Suppose I want to search for a certain word, expression or structure in the Latin literature. What online tools can I use for such purposes? Where can I find a large collection of Latin texts in ...
6
votes
2answers
3k views

Websites for Latin pronunciation? [closed]

The only one I've found so far is Google Translate. Is Google's Latin pronunciation good/reliable? If not, what are some other resources? Example from Google: ceteris paribus (click on the 🔊 icon). ...
14
votes
1answer
130 views

Why is “repetunt” 3rd pl active in Luke 12:20 (Vulgate)?

I was reading today's gospel from the Roman calendar and noticed this in Luke 12:20: dixit autem illi Deus stulte hac nocte animam tuam repetunt a te quae autem parasti cuius erunt I was struck by ...
10
votes
1answer
245 views

The medieval abbreviation eccƚie

The abbreviation eccƚie is common in medieval latin texts, like this: which is from page 78 of Placita de quo Warranto. It can also be seen in this text and this text. There is a horizontal bar ...
10
votes
2answers
146 views

Choosing conjunctive tenses in a clause subordinate to a subordinate clause

I will phrase my question through an example. Consider this sentence in English: I do not know whether you wrote where you are. This has one governing clause ("I do not know") and two indirect ...
8
votes
2answers
269 views

Material for learning new poetic meters

I like metric poetry, and sometimes I want to broaden my horizons by learning a new poetic meter. This has proven quite difficult, because the descriptions in many guides are quite terse. For example, ...
13
votes
2answers
887 views

Representing medieval latin abbreviation symbols in Unicode

I'm trying to understand a paragraph from the 1806 transcription of latin legal texts from 1331, while being proficient at neither law nor latin. An example: which is from page 78 of Placita de quo ...
13
votes
6answers
16k views

How did the Romans wish good birthday?

I know how to wish a happy birthday in Latin: Bonum diem natalem! (There are other options as well.) It just occurred to me that I do not recall coming across any ancient birthday congratulations. Do ...
5
votes
2answers
630 views

Translating “machines” and “people”

What are the Latin words for machines and people? I want to use them as names of wireless networks. I am not sure how accurate Google translate is, but it suggests machinae and populo. Are those even ...
9
votes
2answers
1k views

How would one say “Pardon me,” in the sense of not understanding or hearing, in Classical Latin?

Especially when speaking a second language, I am forced to frequently say something like "Pardon me?" or "What was that?" or "Excuse me?" when I fail to understand or hear what a speaker says. I'd ...
15
votes
1answer
793 views

Translating “I too can write in Latin”

I want to translate this short sentence to Latin: I too can write in Latin. I mean that there are also others who know Latin, not that I can write in other languages or that I can speak Latin. ...
12
votes
1answer
1k views

“All-forgiving” expressed with the omni- prefix

The English language has a handful of words starting with omni- to express all-: omniscient all-knowing omnipotent all-powerful omnipresent present everywhere How would one express all-forgiving ...
4
votes
1answer
183 views

Is it possible to use και as both coordinating and correlative conjunctions in the same sentence?

As a textbook exercise, I'm translating the following sentence from English into Greek. Farewell, dear country! The war will be long, and I shall flee through the rivers and the marshes. (T1 = my ...
8
votes
2answers
335 views

Consecutio temporum et praesens historicum

Sometimes in an intensive narrative the present tense is used to refer to past events. Such use of the present tense is called praesens historicum. It is formally present but semantically past. How ...
10
votes
3answers
4k views

Mother Earth in Latin - Personification

I'm looking for a Latin equivalent to the personification 'Mother Earth'. Does Matris Orbis or Mater Terram do the job? Do they translate in the same way?
5
votes
3answers
316 views

Greatly fruitful in Latin?

I lack ample knowledge of Latin to piece together a proper equivalent phrase of the following: "Greatly fruitful," or "Great bounty"; in the context of referring to a food being very nutritious. Here'...
7
votes
2answers
271 views

Ambiguities in De Bello Gallico 1.3.3

There are a couple words and phrases which are ambiguous to me in Caesar's De Bello Gallico, 1.3.3. I'll reproduce the text, here, which I got from the Perseus digital library. Ad eas res ...
3
votes
1answer
188 views

How did I misunderstand the Latin 'consisto' in interpreting 'X consists in Y'?

I am trying to understand the English phrase "X consists in Y" with help of and in comparison to the Latin verb consistere. In English, 1 means "X contains Y", but from the Latin point of view ...
8
votes
2answers
245 views

Can you please translate these paragraphs (13th & 14th century)?

My dad found these two texts in a book whose title I don't know. For a guess of the origin, see below. 13th century: sed libera, mais delivre nous, sire, a malo, de tout mal et de cruel martire ...
5
votes
1answer
51 views

How to search for neuters ending in -tus?

For reasons of rhyming I sometimes need to search for Latin words with specific kinds of endings. Translating songs to Latin is a hobby that seems to inevitably lead to this need. I would like to ...
10
votes
1answer
247 views

Mediaeval Latin adopted the Greek word 'grapheus' as '-gravius' (which led to Dutch/German 'graaf/Graf', “count”); where and when did this happen?

Philippa (2003–2009) says about the Dutch word graaf, "count", that it came from Greek grapheus "writer/scribe", through Mediaeval Latin -gravius, "royal administrative ...
11
votes
1answer
4k views

Why did Roman children call their father 'tata' instead of 'pappa'?

I was reading a text from Hans H. Øberg, and I saw in the text the following sentences: Noli dicere 'tatam' et 'mammam', Iuliola! Ea nomina a te audire nolumus. Ita loquuntur parvuli infantes, nec ...
13
votes
1answer
156 views

How to tell when an inscription is post-classical?

When traveling in Europe, I occasionally come across Latin inscriptions. Their ages vary greatly, and I would like to get some tools for quickly estimating their age. How can I tell if an inscription ...
7
votes
1answer
160 views

What is the difference between emere and coemere?

I was reading Caesar's De Bello Gallico 1.3.1, and I was curious why he used the word coemere when emere also seemed possible; which got me wondering, what exactly is the difference between the two ...
4
votes
3answers
513 views

Why is the Greek definite article τη duplicated in this sentence?

I was translating a simplified version of Two Friends and a Bear, one of Aesop's fables, listed as #65 in the Perry Index. The text begins with the sentence: Δύο φίλοι τῇ ὁδῷ τῇ εἰς τὴν χώραν ...
8
votes
1answer
303 views

What are your views on inventing place-names in Latin?

This is a kind of extension to the question about -landia as a proper way of forming a country's Latin name. Correspondents, usually helpful, comment on my Latin syntax and, ever seeking improvement, ...
10
votes
2answers
418 views

Is “-landia” good Latin?

Several Latin names of modern countries end in -landia if the corresponding English name ends in -land: Islandia, Nederlandia, Irlandia, Thailandia, Finlandia (also Finnia). England has a much older ...

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