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7
votes
5answers
2k views

A variation on Caesar

We just moved into a new house, and my cat was very quick to make herself comfortable. I described her approach as "I came, I saw, I took possession" and of course that got me to wondering what that ...
4
votes
2answers
153 views

“How do you do?”

How to ask "How do you do?" in Latin. Quomodo te habes, is it common? What other common greetings for the "How are you?" exist? I have seen: Quomodo es? Quid agis? Quomodo te habes?
2
votes
1answer
46 views

Translation of “the past shall live” into Latin

I am translating the motto, "The Past Shall Live" into classical Latin. Currently, I have Praeteritum Vivet, which I think makes sense, but I'd appreciate the input of those more skilled than I.
1
vote
1answer
62 views

Elit Scelerisque Mauris Pellentesque Pulvinar - Could some one please help to translate this

Could someone please help to transtale "Elit Scelerisque Mauris Pellentesque Pulvinar" to English? Many thanks and best regards, Phuong
0
votes
1answer
78 views

Asking a teacher for more (hopefully extra credit) homework

Salvete, Sodales! I'm a student in his second year of Latin study, but my class has been slow in reading our texts and I've been bored from the beginning. I want to ask my teacher to give me more ...
5
votes
2answers
345 views

Translating “newsletter” or “bulletin”

Is there any analogue of English newsletter or French bulletin in Latin?
2
votes
0answers
30 views

What order of the cases did the Romans use when declining nouns? [duplicate]

In modern books, two orders of the cases can be found: nom, gen, dat, acc, abl, and nom, acc, gen, dat, abl. Which one did the Romans use? Or did they use some entirely different order?
2
votes
0answers
60 views

Discere and Studere

When "discere" can be synonymous with "studere"? I read an old book saying that: "discere" and "studere" aren't usually synonymous, but they can be in some particular contexts. I'd like to know in ...
4
votes
1answer
69 views

Use of the chiasmus in Latin

Was the chiasma common in Latin? Or an uncommon figure of speech? (Words in a sentence with the pattern ABBA or ABBCBBA, etc...) Where could we meet the greatest amount of chiasma? In poetry? In ...
4
votes
0answers
87 views

Difference between dexter/sinister and rectus/laevus?

Is there a difference between the pair dexter/sinister (right/left) and rectus/laevus? I was only aware of the pair dexter/sinister until recently, when I learned that chiral molecules in molecular ...
1
vote
1answer
71 views

Difference in the role of Cenaculum and Triclinum

Why Romans had both, Cenaculum and Triclinum, as dinning rooms? What was the difference, and why Cenaculum was upstairs? What was the benefit to have a dining room in the attic. I know what is a ...
3
votes
1answer
74 views

Idiomatic translation of “Art will save me” to Latin

Is there a more idiomatic translation Into Latin of the sentence “Art will save me.” than “Ars servabit me fac.”?
3
votes
2answers
88 views

A software in Latin?

I visited a webpage translating a bunch of IT words into Latin, so I know the vocabulary does exist. As I'm an avid language learner, sometimes I download apps and software in a foreign language to ...
2
votes
2answers
178 views

Origin of “Interficere”?

I don't understand the etymology of interfacio: inter + facio. How it became "to kill"? What is the link between "to do between"?
4
votes
1answer
103 views

In this passage, why verbo instead of verbum?

There's a phrase from the Gospel that's used in the liturgy -- "sed tantum dic verbo" [et sanabitur anima mea], "but only say the word" [and my soul shall be healed]. Why verbo (dative or ablative) ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

My boy, my woman, my man, my girl

What would be the meaning for "my girl", "my man", "my boy", "my woman" in Latin? If I use filia tua, it means you daughter, but could be used as puella tua to mean the same, or is there other ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

About the difference between the enclitic “ne” and the non-enclitic “ne”

So, I know that -ne is an enclitic to express a yes/no question. But, the "Ne", as a non-enclitic, as I understood it, could also be a word question. In "Ne....annon" or "Ne....necne" Meaning Is it....
4
votes
0answers
45 views

Are dialogues in ancient texts declared with “He said: …” and “She said: …”

I am particularly interested atm in the Edda where it has "Foo spake:" and "Bar spake:" before several of the stanzas. But that's Old Norse. This being a Latin site, I am interested in the Latin Mass ...
2
votes
0answers
41 views

How was the original Ovid Metamorphoses formatted/punctuated most likely?

What punctuation was used in Classical Latin? was very insightful, but it doesn't go into specifics. Wikipedia said we don't have any original sources of Ovid's Metamorphoses until the 9th or 10th ...
3
votes
2answers
100 views

Can you split “natus sum”?

What are the conditions to make a reasonable hyperbate? Reasonable, I mean, if I don't want to sound to poetical, as I know the word order is more free in poetry, the same rules for word orders don't ...
4
votes
2answers
287 views

Understanding the use of 'eo' in a sentence from LLPSI

The usage of eo is somewhat confusing to me with this sentence: Medus prope Romam est; iam muri Romani ab eo videntur et porta Capena. The first half is easy, however the second half is confusing ...
11
votes
5answers
4k views

Is this bible in Koine Greek?

So I bought a Greek bible and I’m not sure whether it is Koine or Modern Greek. Could someone please help me out? Thanks.
5
votes
0answers
77 views

How did the Romans salute the Republic?

Are there any known phrases that were used by Romans to celebrate or cheer for the Republic? Something like Ave Res Publica ? Or maybe they'd cheer for something else, like for the Senate or for the ...
2
votes
1answer
82 views

How do you say “audio (sound track)”?

I was trying to say to a friend of mine "We need to speak in Latin through audio" and I just noticed I have no idea the appropriate word for "audio" in Latin. And it doesn't help the fact that the ...
2
votes
0answers
36 views

As for I and V, when are they semi semivowels and when are they vowels?

In the olden days, before they had invented letters J and U, the way they spelled ords like IVLIVS always seemed to me like they could be misread a little, and if you don't know the word, you don't ...
1
vote
0answers
44 views

Is it possible to use a prepositional phrase with a gerundive/gerund?

can we use prepositional phrases (like "de domo") linked to a gerund or a gerundive, can it act as an object?
2
votes
0answers
145 views

Gerundives in Ablative Absolute constructions?

I was wondering if Gerundives, the verbal adjectives referred to as "passive future participles" by Latin grammarians, can appear as predicates of (true) Ablative Absolute (AA) constructions. As is ...
0
votes
1answer
103 views

How to say “In his absence” and “Where is God” in Latin? [closed]

I am looking for the Latin translation of two phrases: "In his absence" and "Where is God".
2
votes
0answers
33 views

Difference between Sententia and Opinio?

Could you give some examples of sentences showing the difference between Opinio and Sentencia? Aren't both good translations for "opinions?" "Through" and "opinion" seems to be translated by both: ...
2
votes
2answers
123 views

How could Dalmatian “anca” derive from Latin “hanc hodie”?

The semantic derivation from hanc hodie "this here day" to "also", "even" etc. does make no sense to me. The editor who added the etymology to wiki/anca and a many other languages, that share this ...
4
votes
0answers
40 views

Modern Latin for pixel

I want something concise that gives an immediate idea of what the word means like Bildpunkt in German. An academic friend has suggested pixellum, with a gloss like "elementum vel στοιχεῖον minimum ...
1
vote
3answers
65 views

What is the Latin for “public business must be done in public”?

I want to know the Latin for the phrase “public business must be done in public”.
2
votes
0answers
39 views

Contraction of the v-perfect in the first person singular

When there is talk about the v-perfect contraction, I don't ever see first person forms used as examples, only forms like "amavisti" becoming "amasti". So my question is whether first person singular ...
3
votes
1answer
57 views

Meanings of cibus, and cibi

The dictionary I use tells me that Cibus, could mean "food", or "meals" or "dishes", and many other related meanings. So, I find logical, that, when you have the plural, it means rather meals/dishes. ...
2
votes
0answers
32 views

What is the difference between fessus and lassatus in Latin?

Could one of them implies a physical fatigue, and the other one a psychological/emotional one. Or is it a matter of intensity? Please, give me some sentences as examples.
3
votes
1answer
83 views

Coming from physically or originate from a place? (Ab Gallia venio)

With "Ab Gallia venio. or "De Gallia venio". (Or other sentences of the same kind) Could it mean both, I come from this place, or I am originated from this place (like a nationality, or the origin of ...
4
votes
1answer
42 views

How do you translate “My potions are too strong for you?”

It is really just the "are too strong for you" I am having trouble with. We haven't gone over how to say stuff like that in class yet. Would you use the superlative?
4
votes
3answers
138 views

Confused about the use of “quae” as an interrogative word

Sometimes, I read that "quae" could be used, not only as a relative word, but also as an interrogative word. Sometimes I read that it's not like that in the correct usage. Quote, from a fellow Latin ...
3
votes
2answers
78 views

Translate “Crater Lake” into classical Latin

From what I have read of this post, Latin doesn't really use nouns as adjectives in the way that English does, although that post mentions you can use a noun in genitive case to achieve this. I am ...
12
votes
2answers
2k views

What does this damaged inscription in a church say?

I've been sent the following photo of an inscription in a Unitarian church. As best I can tell, it says: Templum hoc [re]novat[u]m est […]eribus denuo et inte[g]re[?] regnante serenissimo dono ...
5
votes
1answer
224 views

Could an adjective be used like an adverb in Latin?

As a general rule, could an adjective be used like an adverb in Latin? What would be some exceptions?
2
votes
1answer
53 views

ULD adpositions

To familiarize myself with Latin adpositions, I tried to translate the first chapter of the Universal Language Dictionary. I would like to find for each term the least ambiguous and most common ...
3
votes
1answer
73 views

Fill vs fill up in Latin?

If I wanted to translate "To fill a cup" and "To fill up a cup", are there in Latin 2 different words to translate "fill" and "fill up"? To fill up = to fill totally.
1
vote
1answer
105 views

A Client Submits Feedback On Her Prostitutes

I am trying to translate the following line, inspired by a fatuous Roman spoof, "Plebs", in which two hapless new recruits to a cadre of male prostitutes, the "Knights of Eros", are being debriefed, ...
6
votes
1answer
210 views

Substantivization of “continuum”

I wonder how to translate "continuum hypothesis" into Latin. Indeed, "continuum" is an adjective in Latin (so we would have "continuous hypothesis" if we were trying a literal translation) and I don't ...
3
votes
1answer
93 views

Translation to Latin of “everything is revenge”

I'm trying to translate a phrase. I'm trying to say "everything is (part of) revenge", as in "every action is an act of revenge against the ones that tried to break you". Sorry if it's not too clear ...
5
votes
1answer
382 views

May they rest in peace

This may become an inscription written on a historical marker commemorating a mass grave. Which of the following is correct: Requiesce in Pace or Requiescant in Pace? The former was offered up by a ...
2
votes
0answers
37 views

Etymology of the adjective ‘idoneus’

All etymological dictionaries includung Wiktionary and De Vaan’s Etymological Dictionary state the ultimate origin of the Latin adjective idoneus (‘suitable’; ‘sufficient’) is unknown. I was ...
8
votes
1answer
215 views

Origins of the adjective ‘inanis’

According to Wiktionary and De Vaan’s Etymological Dictionary, the etymology of the Latin adjective inanis (‘empty’; ‘worthless’) is unknown. I was wondering if anybody had a theory on the origin of ...
7
votes
2answers
304 views

Why distinguish u/v but not i/j?

Latin Wikipedia and many other modern (Classical?) Latin texts use "u" for the vowel /u/ and "v" for the consonant /w/, but "i" for both the vowel /i/ and the consonant /j/. This practice is more ...

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