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77 views

“Life decreed better!” in Latin

Sort of, related to my another qestion. I am looking for mo secular (for the lack of a better word) version of a phrase "Di melius!". While I know that deus could be interpreted as "...
4
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1answer
90 views

Is “Heaven decreed better!” a correct translation for “Di melius!”

The phrase Di melius! comes from Letter 98 of Moral letters to Lucilius, original text can be found here. The translation Heaven decreed better! is by Richard M. Gummere Ph.D. More comprehensive ...
6
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2answers
2k views

Meaning of “io” in Christmas carol

The carol Adeste Fideles includes the line "Cantet nunc io chorus angelorum". What does "io" mean?
2
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0answers
41 views

Does a general rule for forming Locative Singular exist?

If I understood right the Locative is mostly to be formed in singular (e.g. domi, ruri, ...). Some websites say that we just use the same form as the genitive, some websites say that we use the ...
5
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0answers
57 views

“From beyond the grave”

When someone does something after death — such as causing harm by their will — they can be said to act "from beyond the grave". Is there a similar idiom in Latin? Any era will do, although ...
8
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1answer
158 views

On what basis is bilabial [ɸ] rather than labiodental [f] reconstructed for any Latin varieties?

I've seen references in some of my reading to a reconstructed value of a bilabial fricative [ɸ] for Latin "f" in some times and places. Examples: This answer on the Spanish Stack Exchange ...
3
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1answer
78 views

“Multi quidem facilius se abstinent ut non utantur, quam temperent ut bene utantur” (the usage of comparatives)

From Augustine De Bono Coniugali: Multi quidem facilius se abstinent ut non utantur, quam temperent ut bene utantur. While the meaning of the sentence is clear, I'm not sure about the grammatical ...
4
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1answer
124 views

Pronunciation of “Bethlehem” in “Adeste Fideles”

Pavarotti Fischer Adeste fideles laeti triumphantes Venite, venite in Bethlehem Natum videte regem angelorum Venite, adoremus, Venite, adoremus, Venite, adoremus, dominum! In the first link above ...
2
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1answer
71 views

How is the (rare) Locative Plural formed?

If I understood right the Locative is only to be formed in singular (e.g. domi, ruri, ...). But when it comes to words (especially cities / small islands) that only exist in Plural (e.g. Athenae) we ...
4
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1answer
63 views

Eo. . .quo se ipsa magis

How would I translate this sentence? "Eo vero minus ex hoc loco quicquam efficitur, quod Ecclesia cum rogat "Converte me Domine," rogat ut Deus quo se ipsa magis ad Deum convertat ...
3
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1answer
102 views

What is the ablative construction at play here?

I am reading Historia plantarvm vniuersalis. There are many sentences I do not understand, but the particular one I would like to ask about is on page 10 (page 26 in the link): Literal transcription: ...
7
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1answer
478 views

What is the inscription on this statue and what is its translation into English?

The picture below shows a statue with inscription in Latin. The statue is situated in Malbork Castle, Poland. I can read Bethlehem, and Google Translate tells me that in millibus means "in ...
1
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1answer
65 views

How do you translate “Tempesta ti parendum” in english?

What´s the deep meaning of this sentence?
6
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1answer
638 views

Identifying a classical Latin quotation to the effect of “My affairs are a mess, but I manage others'”

I recall a Latin quotation I encountered some years ago, ex memoria in John Gray's Lawyer's Latin, but I don't have the book to hand and can't find the source of it. It was something to the effect ...
1
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2answers
138 views

Translate “I am the storm”

Can someone please help translate this "I am the storm". The context is “The devil whispered in my ear, ‘You’re not strong enough to withstand the storm.’ Today I whispered in the devil’s ...
5
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1answer
205 views

Changing tones (?) in Classical Latin

When I heard Classical Latin for the first time on Horatii carmina quae voce canora Thomas Nudipes pronuntiat, I was surprised to hear what I will describe as changing tones! The reason why I was ...
4
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1answer
223 views

Are future active participles of deponent verbs used in place of future passive participles? Why?

In form, nātūrus is a future active participle of the (deponent) verb nāscor – which otherwise only appears in passive forms – and is used to mean about to rise and, taken literally, about to be born, ...
2
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1answer
71 views

What exactly is the meaning and usage of “communemque?”

I'm reading through a Latin edition of the Republic. Book III starts off as follows: Haec igitur sunt, ut mihi videtur, quae de Diis audienda aut non audienda sint prima a pueritia his, qui Deos et ...
2
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1answer
62 views

Ex Ovis Pullus Non Natis Serò Fit Ullus

"Ex ovis pullus non natis serò fit ullus" is the name of an EP by Finnish experimental hip hop duo Paperi T & Khid. According to Paperi T, the phrase might mean "huonoista munista ...
3
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1answer
65 views

Tenses in the Christmas carol “Personent hodie”

There is a Christmas carol called "Personent hodie" written in Latin in Finland in the 16th century. In the third verse the three mages are described: Magi tres venerunt, munera offerunt, ...
5
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4answers
687 views

Translate “Eat, Drink, and be merry” to Latin

In the spirit of the holidays, I was thinking about how you would say Eat! Drink! Be Merry! in Latin (or written as Eat, drink, and be merry!). There are multiple words for each, but I'm not sure ...
1
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2answers
111 views

How do you say 'You saying so doesn't make it so' in Latin?

So, how do you say "You saying so doesn't make it so" in Latin? I think it would be a literal translation of Croatian "Tvoje to reći to ne čini", Tuum id dicere id non facit, but I ...
7
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2answers
193 views

Can “celare” take an accusative?

This came up in Duolingo: the sentence "The girl is hiding cookies under her dress" is translated by the app as "Puella crustula sub stola celat". However the question has been ...
6
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1answer
199 views

Two levels of 'and'

What I am looking for is best illustrate by an example, so please excuse the detour. In Finnish there are two words for "and": "ja" and "sekä". When used together, "...
4
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1answer
74 views

reference for the greek word παστός as ritual coffin for initiation rites

In this link, it is mentioned in the introduction that one of the meanings of the word ΄παστός' is that of a "coffin for priests used in initiation rites in remembrance of the death of the god ...
3
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1answer
86 views

Can't recall if I half-assed this

I'm going through some of my older poetry and I found this verse in Latin, which I don't know how to speak or write: Suspirat diu ab scapula eius. Basit ab palmus dorsum eius. Silentium regnat. ...
6
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2answers
125 views

What is the proper way to cite the Packhum corpus?

The PHI Latin corpus (previously known as PHI5.3 and now available to search online) is certainly an important tool, and I've made good use of it in various corpus analyses. However, I'm not sure how ...
4
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0answers
106 views

Can a finite verb modify another verb as if it were a gerund? (De manibus delapsa arma ceciderunt)

How should we interpret the connection between delapsa and ceciderunt in the following: de manibus audacissimorum civium delapsa arma ipsa ceciderunt (Cic. De Officiis) Naturally I could not see ...
4
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1answer
130 views

What are the Latin lyrics to Ringo Starr's “Pax Um Biscum (Peace Be With You)”

Happy Christmastime everyone! Being this time of year I pulled out one of my favorite Christmas records, which is Ringo Starr's I Wanna Be Santa Claus. The last track of the album is called "...
4
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1answer
87 views

The Role of “quem” in a Translation of Cicero

Cicero "de Oratione" (2.86.351): "iam istuc quantum tibi ego reliquerim, inquit Antonius, erit in tua potestate. Si enim vere agere volueris, omnia tibi relinquo; sin dissimulare, tu ...
6
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1answer
96 views

Is there a dictionary for pronunciation explanations?

All dictionaries I have seen that state vowel quantities simply state them but do not explain how the quantity of each vowel was determined. The same goes for the distinctions between vocalic and ...
4
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1answer
167 views

translation for Strength, love and courage to Latin

I would like to engrave a piece in Latin for my teenage son with our “family motto.” The motto is strength, love and courage. He is studying Latin and I want to be sure the word choice is accurate. ...
6
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1answer
361 views

Pronunciation of “quoniam”

Is the "i" in "quoniam" a vowel or a consonant? Just based on the spelling it makes sense as a vowel (quo.ni.am), but at the same time etymologically as "quom + iam" it ...
9
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1answer
150 views

Quis opera Ciceronia partivit in capitula intervallaque?

Accidit permirum mihi in nunnullis operis Ciceronibus legendis numeros capitulorum et intervallorum alteros ab alteris dissentire. Exspectem unum capitulum ex pluribus intervallis consistere, et ...
5
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0answers
83 views

How did Jerome pronounce the Latin language?

Jerome (Eusebius Sophronius Hieronymus) lived between the 4th and 5th centuries. He translated the Bible into Latin as the Vulgate (Biblia Vulgata). How would he have pronounced the Latin language? In ...
16
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2answers
2k views

What's up with 'ubī'?

Just noticed, with respect to this question about 'which' and the five 'wh-' question words, that there's kind of a similar but reverse sort of situation in Latin. It looks like of all the ...
10
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1answer
179 views

Lonely vs. alone

A person is alone when there are no other people around. A person is lonely when the presence of other people is missed. Neither implies the other; you can be lonely but not alone or alone but not ...
4
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1answer
98 views

Always Cats in Latin

I know that "semper fidelis" means something like "always faithful". I want to make a little joke by saying something similar to "semper fidelis" but to mean something ...
6
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1answer
400 views

How does “quid causae” work grammatically?

I do not understand the grammar of quid causae = "[for] what cause", as in Nescio quid causae fuerit, cur nullas ad me litteras dares I do not know what the reason was why you sent me no ...
3
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1answer
87 views

Who is the ancient author “Dion.” writing in Greek on bankruptcy law?

I have a book on the old Roman law (Twelve Tables) citing a Greek source for a detail on the bankruptcy/execution law. It is named "Dion." but I did not find a fitting work of a "...
8
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2answers
766 views

Latin translation of “don't get caught”

I am looking for a translation of "don't get caught". This phrase is the slogan of World Chase Tag (a tag competition), and it seems like they tried to put a Latin translation on their ...
7
votes
1answer
138 views

Composition of a word ἡμιόλιος

The Ancient Greek word ἡμιόλιος means literally "one and a half", referring to the ratio 3:2 and the interval of a perfect fifth in music. I wonder how this word is composed of: is it ἡμι- (...
5
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1answer
167 views

Is this double accusative or hyperbaton or something else?

I've only been learning Latin for a month or so, but I'm specifically learning so that I can read scientific and mathematical texts from the 17th-19th centuries. It's slow going, of course- I'm only ...
7
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0answers
255 views

Is “Every new beginning comes from some other beginning's end” correctly attributed to Seneca (the younger)?

The quote is a fairly well know lyric in the 1998 song Closing Time by Semisonic. In the Wikipedia entry for the song, it claims "The song ends with a quote attributed to Roman Stoic philosopher ...
8
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1answer
242 views

Constituendi autem sunt qui sint in amicitia fines et quasi termini diligendi (Cic. Amic. 56)

I was wondering to what extent the agreement pattern exemplified with the following sentences drawn from Cicero's De Amicitia can be regarded as the most natural one. I'm asking this question since, ...
6
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1answer
122 views

UPDATE: How to translate “Comfort the afflicted; afflict the comfortable?”

I am trying to translate the saying "Comfort the afflicted; afflict the comfortable" into Latin, but I don't actually know Latin, and I've run into a wall. I think the verbs should be ...
10
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2answers
291 views

How should “porta itineri longissima” be interpreted?

According to a comment by @SebastianKoppehel, the interpretation of porta itineri as "the gate to the journey" seems questionable. Wiktionary, for example, has the following translation: ...
3
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0answers
76 views

Was the letter phi used in Latin?

Is there any evidence of the Greek letter phi being borrowed to write Latin words of Greek origin as φilosoφia for example? The question is not restricted to Classical Latin.
4
votes
1answer
243 views

Is “gate to heaven” “foris paradisi” or “foris paradiso”?

I noticed that the Croatian for "gate to heaven" is "vrata raja", "raja" being the genitive singular (rather than dative) of "raj" (heaven). I was wondering how ...
4
votes
1answer
107 views

Nouns in locative in connection to adjectives (Does every adjective have a locative?)

I've did a bit of research on locatives and which words can form a locative. On a German website (Link) I found an explanation which words can have a locative: geographical names (like cities and ...

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