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Best Latin Websites to learn/revise/practice tests

I was wondering what the best websites for (a) learning latin and (b) revising/doing practice tests are? More specifically, I was wondering if anyone happened to have or know where I could find some ...
4
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0answers
92 views

To what extant there was a difference between written and spoken Latin?

Particularly in terms of word-order in sentence. I doubt, for example, if we would hear sentence like this: "Tarda solet magna in rebus adesse fides" (Ovid) where we have Tarda and fides gapped ...
1
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1answer
139 views

Does this sentence in Latin make sense?

I'm having some trouble with indirect speech and was wondering if my answers to these questions are correctly worded. Quid Priamus ante Pyrrhō praedīxit quam periit? Priamus praedixit deos ...
8
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1answer
2k views

Is there a relationship between the word amor (love) & mors (death)?

I recently read in a book that there is an etymological relationship between the Latin words amor & mort but no citation is given. Looking at an online etymological dictionary (Wiktionary) did not ...
5
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1answer
76 views

Colonna as cognomen

I am working on the Italian Renaissance soldier Stefano Colonna. How would his name be written in Latin, as a label or signature, Stephanus? What is the proper genitive for "of the Colonna family"? ...
3
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1answer
50 views

Are there any general rules for creating 'proper' Latin neologisms, beyond matching gender, number, and case?

For the sake of this question, I'm going to be using this definition of neologism, "A newly coined word or phrase." From my understanding, the loose etymology of this word is the French neo plus Greek ...
3
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1answer
73 views

Vowel hiatus and non-diphthong vowel pairs (compared to Romance languages)

Classical Latin's 6 major diphthongs are clear-cut, phonologically speaking. We know ae is pronounced as one phoneme, such as in [ˈsae̯.pɛ], "saepe." However, we often come across words that have 2 ...
6
votes
1answer
437 views

Is x considered one consonant or two?

We know that letter x is pronounced "cs" ("ks") i.e. as two consonants. But it is still one letter. When it stands between two vowels, is the first syllable considered open or close?
6
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1answer
170 views

Can “sum” and “nemo” work together to create a phrase meaning “I am no one?”

I have been trying to understand the relationship between "sum" and "nemo", to create a phrase meaning something like "I am no one". In all the contexts I personally ...
5
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1answer
67 views

Where does the -τ- come from in the oblique stem of some Greek neuter nouns with nom/acc sing forms in -ς?

I just learned that some Greek neuter nouns of the third declension with a nominative/accusative singular form ending in -ς have oblique stems in -τ-, which surprised me. I expected τ-stem neuter ...
1
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3answers
107 views

What would “kiwi” be in Latin? [closed]

What would kiwi be in Latin? Both the bird and the fruit. I guess there's no actual word because I don't think they had kiwis, but what would you guess it to be if you had to use it?
10
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2answers
735 views

How to decline a whale?

The Latin word cētus (a whale or some other major sea creature) behaves peculiarly. In singular it is a normal-looking masculine cētus, but in plural it is a neuter cētē. The ...
-2
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1answer
42 views

How does the subjunctive "under' + 'join'?

[Etymonline:] ... from sub "under" (see sub-) + iungere "to join" (see jugular). ... [OED:] ... The subjunctive mood was so called because it was regarded as specially appropriate to ‘subjoined’ ...
3
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1answer
42 views

What exactly does the prefix 'in-' signify, in 'impartire'?

It seems that the Latin verb impartire (more commonly impertire) means "to share with another, to communicate, bestow, impart". The English verb impart comes from this. What does the prefix in- mean ...
3
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1answer
138 views

Redundancy of “quo” with “de”

Passage: “Quo de genere mortis difficile dictu est.” Cic. Amic. 12 English translation (from Loeb): “It is hard to speak of the nature of his death.” French translation : “Quant à la nature de sa ...
3
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1answer
55 views

Description of Eurus in Ovid's Metamorphoses

Here's a quote from Ovid's Metamorphoses 1.61-2, where he talks about Eurus, the east wind: Eurus ad Auroram Nabataeaque regna recessit Persidaque et radiis iuga subdita matutinis I've translated it ...
3
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2answers
151 views

Translate fictional location and book into Latin

I'm not an English speaker and I don't know many definitions and "big" words in that language, so forgive me for speaking like a barbarian. I have no knowledge of Latin, but I want to make some ...
2
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2answers
74 views

Why is Novarupta feminine?

Today is the anniversary of the Novarupta eruption, the largest volcanic eruption of the 20th century. Nova rupta is of course good Latin for "new broken thing", where the thing in question is ...
2
votes
1answer
75 views

sentence analysis - usage of ambo

In the beginning of the first Dialogue ("Surrectio Matutina") in Linguae Latinae Exercitatio of Juan Luis Vives we read: Beatrix: Jesus Christus exuscitet vos a somno vitiorum. Heus pueri estis ne ...
16
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3answers
1k views

Is any animal neuter in Latin?

The word animal itself is neuter in Latin, but at least all of the common animal species seem to be masculine or feminine (or common gender): canis, feles, equus, pardus, leo/leaena, lupus/lupa, ursus/...
2
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1answer
85 views

19th century Latin textbooks?

What textbooks were used to teach Neo-Latin in primary, secondary, and higher education schools during the 19th century?
2
votes
1answer
113 views

Res vs Obiectus

What is the difference in meaning between Res and Obiectus( is it merely a matter of Language evolution Classical vs Medieval)? As a meaning I am interested in that which (the thing that) is related ...
5
votes
2answers
106 views

What does “aut asphodelos aut nullus” mean?

Would anyone be able to tell me what "aut asphodelos aut nullus" means. I've tried automatic translators without success. This is a tag from a 1942 novel by Michel Innes (who went in a lot for that ...
5
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0answers
98 views

How old is Ecclesiastical Latin Pronunciation?

Salvete, I have trying to research how old the Ecclesiastical Pronunciation of Latin is. To be more precise, I mean the Italianate pronunciation, called 'La Pronuncia Scolastica' in Italian. Many ...
3
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0answers
61 views

What is a “camarilla” in Latin?

The Spanish word camarilla means a group of conspirators meeting in secret to manipulate the political leadership. It's been borrowed into English, as well as quite a few other Romance languages, ...
4
votes
2answers
92 views

Is there an explanation for this word order?

This website has the Liturgy of the Hours online. The closing prayer for Laudes and Vespers is (line break mine): Dominus nos benedicat et ab omni malo defendat et ad vitam perducat eternam. ...
7
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2answers
182 views

Subjunctive with adverb “quam”

Passage: “Quam autem civitati carus fuerit, maerore funeris indicatum est.” Cic. Amic. 11 My translation in English: «Moreover, how dear he was to the citizenry was indicated by the grief of his ...
5
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0answers
39 views

Example of noun described by adjective of the same root (like “homely home” or “reddish red”)

In theory, we can easily attach a derived adjective to it's noun source. But, as far as I see this, it almost never happens. Yet, I would say, there are very few examples in some languages that are ...
18
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1answer
3k views

What does the Latin abbreviation “A. O. R.” stand for?

Lately I have come across what appears to be a Latin abbreviation, "A. O. R.," on several title pages of books from the eighteenth century. The abbreviation may have to do with the date, perhaps? Here'...
6
votes
3answers
128 views

An introduction to Latin etymology?

I've never studied etymology, but I find myself interested in how words came into Latin and how Latin gave rise to words in other languages. There are many sources for finding the etymology of a given ...
6
votes
3answers
185 views

What would “opossum” be in Latin?

I was wondering how one would translate the word "opossum" into Latin. It derives from Native American names for opossum meaning variably "white dog" and "white animal," so it could be translated ...
3
votes
2answers
350 views

Furtum est, secundum lege lata, contrectatio rei alienae fraudulenta

How to say this in proper, idiomatic, classical Latin? Theft is, according to existing law, laying hands on others' (foreign, strange, belonging to others) things fraudulently. Would one use the ...
-2
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3answers
125 views

Can “ad aliquid” mean “the same”?

Grimms' glossed German einschlägig thus: spectans, pertinens ad aliquid, bezüglich I was looking to understand what einschlägig means, which is only used in fixed expressions, and I'm affraid I ...
5
votes
3answers
582 views

Sentence which includes an example of each case

I'm looking for a sentence which includes the usage of each case of Latin. For example, a student could mark each word in the sentence to indicate its case and function for ease of learning. Extreme ...
9
votes
2answers
1k views

What should an epidemic be called in Latin?

Is there a good Latin word for an epidemic or even a pandemic? The word epidemia is probably easily understood by most, but it doesn't seem to be a classical one. The adjective epidemus is attested ...
4
votes
2answers
196 views

What can be used as a Latin word for “Meltdown” (in the sense used for people with Autism)?

I have a lesser form of Autism (that generally doesn't really manifest much unless people actually live with me or in specific situations) and sometimes I can have a meltdown. I write a journal in ...
5
votes
1answer
99 views

What did the Romans think about new technology?

Are there any attested texts where a Roman comments on some new technology? The modern world sees a constant flux of them, but technological advancement was slower in antiquity and I do not recall ...
10
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2answers
139 views

How to introduce a new topic in conversation (like “by the way”, “speaking of”)?

In English we can use "by the way" to introduce a topic that not related to the previous one. Or we can use "speaking of"/"apropos" when we are using a theme just mentioned to introduce a related ...
5
votes
2answers
119 views

Translation of prayer from English to Latin

I wanted to translate this sentence from my daily prayer to Latin, and wonder whether the construction of the phrase is correct, in terms of grammar. "Da panem, Domine, quibus esuriunt, et fame ...
4
votes
1answer
47 views

How do you translate this verse?

I am reading John 1:27, and I'd like to know how do you make sense of cuius in this verse, and what does corrigiam mean? Ipse est qui post me venturus est, qui ante me factus est: cujus ego non ...
4
votes
1answer
101 views

As X came, Y deftly stepped aside

I was wondering, in a sentence where you have the following structure: As he came, Julius deftly stepped aside Would you express this with dum, or with a participle, or with cum/postquam, while ...
3
votes
2answers
343 views

Why does the NASB translate this verse this way?

The NASB translates ante me factus est in Jn 1:15 as "has a higher rank than I". How does the NASB get this meaning for this phrase? I personally would translate this phrase as "was made before me" ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

What is the best online Latin dictionary? [duplicate]

I'm familiar with perseus.tufts.edu and perseus.uchicago.edu and www.online-latin-dictionary.com. But I was curious to know what do you think is the best free online Latin dictionary?
6
votes
1answer
241 views

What does “his” mean in this verse?

In John 1:12 there's the word his. What does this word mean in this context? 12 Quotquot autem receperunt eum, dedit eis potestatem filios Dei fieri, his qui credunt in nomine ejus: But as ...
2
votes
1answer
98 views

A Completed Action in the Mind OR Indirect Speech?

There are currently two theories (of which I am aware) to explain the use of the perfect subjunctive, in examples from the Latin Vulgate, included in brianpck's answer to Q: Memento quod <...
3
votes
2answers
108 views

“Man to Man” in Latin?

I've been spending a lot of time on this one but not quite sure how you would preserve the idiomatic connotation of the phrase "man to man". I'm planning to use it in a sentence like "they were ...
4
votes
4answers
125 views

What do you call a mind bender in Latin?

There is a video game character called mind bender. Among other things, he can make an enemy unit run over to your side, that is, turn a foe into friend. That's why he can bend their minds. What ...
1
vote
2answers
73 views

Help with translation “I choose myself”

I would like to get a small tattoo with the phrase "I choose myself" meaning I choose myself first before anything and anyone else. I would like to have it done in Latin, so it is a bit less obvious ...
14
votes
4answers
3k views

Meaning of “dies illa” from Dies Irae

The first verse from "Dies Irae" goes like Dies irae, dies illa I'm trying to understand what "illa" is referring to. According to the declension table for pronouns, "illa" corresponds either to ...
5
votes
2answers
199 views

What are the θη-future and θη-aorist?

I see on quite a few resources tenses referred as θη-future or θη-aorist and I don't understand what it exactly means. Are θη-future and θη-aorist another way to say future passive and aorist ...

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