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4
votes
1answer
84 views

Why does “urgueo” exist as a variant of “urgeo”?

The rule I learned for the pronunciation of the digram "gu" before a vowel in Latin was /gw/ after "n", vs. g + vocalic u anywhere else. But I just discovered the exception urgueo /urgweoː/. This is a ...
1
vote
1answer
97 views

How were vowels u and i discerned from consonants v and j?

If in original texts there were no means of distinguishing whether u and i were consonants or vowels, how then do we now know which ones were which? The easy ruleset I learned in high school is that ...
5
votes
2answers
98 views

How to ask “how much time does it take?” in Latin

This question suggested the verb consumere to represent time spent/taken. I wonder what would be the appropriate way to ask "how long does something take?". For some reason "quot/quotus/quam tempus ...
3
votes
0answers
58 views

What was the difference in the concept of “colour” in Latin and modern languages?

For this question: Are there Latin words for hair color?, I had to search a little about the concept of "color" in Latin. I also had a debate on another SE, with people who consider that "color" is ...
2
votes
1answer
70 views

Is the word χιραϲ used in the Codex Sinaiticus as a proper noun to mean Hira or as another part of speech to mean hands?

Codex Sinaiticus gives the following rendition of Isa. 29:12: και δοθηϲεται το βιβλιον τουτο ειϲ χιραϲ ανθρωπου · μη επιϲταμενου γραμʼματα ˙ και ερι αυτω · αναγνωθι ταυτα και ερι . ουκ αιπιϲταμαι ...
7
votes
2answers
155 views

What is “appactim”?

The asker of another question cited a passage from a Hebrew-Latin lexicon: At הֲלוֹם, arab. هَلُمَّ particula, huc, usque huc. pr. appactim. Another edition of the book seems to confirm this ...
4
votes
1answer
3k views

Does this Latin book state that the meaning of the Arabic word ةلم is huc?

Does this Latin book (p.471) state that the meaning of the Arabic word ةلم is 'huc'? I'm asking it because it doesn't understood to me if it's the meaning or maybe the book just gives the ...
0
votes
2answers
65 views

What's the literal translation for a genitive of value?

Quanti... constat? Quanti... constant? "Quanti" is called a "genitive of value". (By the way, I don't understand why it's not a "genitive of price", as we ask for a price here.) -What would be the ...
6
votes
2answers
250 views

What did “quid pro quo” originally mean?

The phrase quid pro quo means "what for what" in Latin, but that makes very little sense to me. Wikipedia hints at the original meaning having to do with substitutions. That makes sense, as pro can ...
1
vote
0answers
24 views

Is there a tool/website to see which non-Latin words are derived from a given Latin word?

One way I use to learn Latin vocabulary is to seek for derived Spanish/English words which meaning I know. For instance, gressus derived into egresar and ingresar, Spanish words which mean to exit ("e[...
6
votes
2answers
155 views

Seneca’s Epistula Moralis XLI: “God” or “a god”?

The Loeb translation by Richard M. Gummere of Seneca's Epistula XLI, "On the God Within Us": Non sunt ad caelum elevandae manus nec exorandus aedituus ut nos ad aurem simulacri, quasi magis ...
5
votes
1answer
94 views

Appropinquare: difference in the meaning according to the case?

Is there a difference in the meaning, between "appropinquare" + dative, and "appropinquare" + ad + accusative? Dictionaries are not very clear about it. https://outils.biblissima.fr/fr/collatinus-...
2
votes
1answer
108 views

What is the difference between is, ille, and hic when they mean “he”?

I already know about the distance, but this is a difference in the meaning when they are demonstrative. What would be the difference in connotations, and their use, when they are "he". I can find ...
5
votes
2answers
250 views

Advenit versus Venit

In Cap. VII of LLPSI, Ørberg introduces Advenit with the following sentence Ecce Iulius ad villam advenit. It's curious to me that the verb includes the preposition; why not just use venit alone ...
1
vote
1answer
110 views

Why was 'haemophilia' created to mean 'A constitutional (usually hereditary) tendency to bleeding'? [closed]

Is this auto-antonymy? I'm guessing so, as humans who love blood undeniably wouldn't want to lose it! If not, which type of semantic shift according to Blank's 1999 typology? OED and haemophilia - ...
6
votes
1answer
182 views

What does “Filiane” mean?

I am learning Latin from Collar and Daniell's FIRST YEAR LATIN. In LESSON IV: THE GENITIVE CASE TO DENOTE POSSESSION, an exercise is given (sentence translation). Some examples: Līberatne? Līberō, ...
6
votes
1answer
105 views

When/where was <FH> used for /f/?

It's generally accepted that the oldest Latin inscription is on the Praenestine Fibula: MANIOS MED FHE FHAKED NUMASIOI The verb here seems to be an old reduplicated perfect of faciō, equivalent to ...
4
votes
1answer
99 views

What is the origin of the deponent verbs and their evolution in Romance languages?

How deponent (and semi-deponent) verbs appeared in Latin, and why? How did they evolve in descend languages? They seem extincts in descend languages (why?) but there are probably specific structured ...
6
votes
2answers
300 views

Looking for a reference in Greek

I am afraid I might be off topic here, but I do not know whom to ask otherwise. I have come across the following sentence: ᾽Αεί τι βούλου χρήσιμον προσμανϑάνειν. I found it on the cover of a (...
5
votes
1answer
118 views

Can a “dative of agent” appear in an Ablative Absolute construction?

I was wondering to what extent the syntactic distribution of so-called “dative of agent” and that of “ablative of agent” is different. For example, besides appearing in verbal contexts (e.g., Proelium ...
3
votes
2answers
297 views

Composer requesting help with a perfect translation [closed]

Ave, Latinstackers! I am writing a three-part piece in Latin for my choir, and I want a perfect, exact translation of the text into Latin, please. I strongly suspect that Google translate has not got ...
9
votes
3answers
251 views

Does Latin have any Portmanteau words?

English has many examples of portmanteau words (e.g. "motel" is a combination of "motor" and "hotel"). Does Latin have any such phenomena?
2
votes
2answers
140 views

Gone But Not Forgotten

On the Andrew Marr TV-prog (Sunday, 10/11/2019) General Sir Nicholas Carter was interviewed. When Marr asked about the declining interest in Remembrance-Day Commemorations, the general quoted ...
2
votes
1answer
92 views

Lists of words to memorize before reading Lingua Latina Per Se Ilustrata classified by type: nouns, verbs, adjectives, etc

I read that a good way to use LLPSI is by memorizing lists of words before going to the text. Does anyone know where these word list are?
3
votes
0answers
38 views

How do you search through one work in TLG?

The Thesaurus Linguae Graecae (TLG) is a popular research tool for working on Greek texts. (Unfortunately, it's a "freemium" model, so you need to pay for full access or get it through a research ...
8
votes
2answers
2k views

Why can “bubo” (“owl”) be feminine or masculine?

Why the occurrence of "bubo" in the Virgilius text is an hapax? This text is the only one listed in Lewis & Short with "bubo" being feminine. Usually, it's a masculine noun. So, it is an hapax. ...
6
votes
1answer
95 views

“Habere” VS dative and genitive of possession?

To mean something that is not owned legally, not owned with the meaning of "being the owner", like when I say "We have a pope", could I use "habere" or only the dative or genitive of possession? Is ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views

Perseus abbreviations

Can somebody give not shortcuted Perseus (Word Study Tool, morphological index) tag names (I'll find explanations myself) or point on the explanation if exists. For example, I can't understand the ...
6
votes
1answer
54 views

Dagger Sign in Diogenes dictionary

Can somebody explain what does this Dagger Sign mean in Diogenes presenting dictionary entries from perseus word study tool?
6
votes
2answers
1k views

Origin of the Latin Language?

Latin is an Italic language which originated in the Italian peninsula, and was originally spoken in Latium and Ancient Rome located along the Mediterranean Sea. Similar to most European languages, ...
2
votes
1answer
83 views

On vowel lengths in Latin

This question originates from this thread upon suggestion of Joonas Ilmavirta. Q. How do we know all the vowel lengths in Latin? It would be of interest to me if we manage to collect a list with ...
8
votes
1answer
446 views

Subjunctive mood in Latin

Should I say "Velisne/Velitisne panem?" To mean "Do you want/would you like some bread? Or would I use Visne/Vultisne? So, would I use subjunctive to ask or the indicative mood?
6
votes
2answers
266 views

Doubt on pronunciation of verbs (stressing)

I have recently heard somebody (quoting Virgil) saying "Timèo Danaos...". This sounds awkward to me, but I confess I have not studied Latin for ages. I remember that timeo is a verb like moneo, II ...
1
vote
2answers
56 views

How do you say “fruits of darkness” in Latin?

I am writing a text where this phrase is on a big part. It will be the title, so it's important to me to got it right. Thank you. :)
4
votes
2answers
105 views

Is “ex-” (old, past) seen in Latin

I just really don't know where English ex-, as in "ex-friend" exactly came from. So far I havent seen such meaning in Latin (or Greek), but I know little. It would bolster the following idea, if there ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

Translate latin phrase

I remember once reading a phrase like "Nam Iesus Christus mori fiat/fiet (not quite sure which)" or something like that. I don't remember any more if it is the precise phrase and I'm not sure where I ...
4
votes
1answer
79 views

Found eius but pēius in the same text: is it some kind of mistake?

While I was reading Lingua Latina per se Illustrata - Familia Romana, I noted something: the vocabulary list has ĕius but pēius, is that by accident? Also I noted meī as mēī in line 92 of chapter 25, ...
2
votes
4answers
142 views

“No virtue in being a humankind” into Latin

For a cartoon project about a veterinary office, I need to translate below phrase into Latin. The shorter, better as it’s going to be the slogan/motto. "No virtue in being a humankind." It literally ...
4
votes
1answer
194 views

What do you say in Latin when something sucks?

In English you can say: "This job/movie/party/[anything] sucks!" This is a concise and slightly profane way of expressing displeasure. Is there something similar in Latin? The corresponding Finnish ...
2
votes
1answer
47 views

Translation request

I would like to translate the term "always loved" - referring to 2 parents. Would it be acceptable to translate this as semper carissimi rather than semper amati?
7
votes
5answers
2k views

A variation on Caesar

We just moved into a new house, and my cat was very quick to make herself comfortable. I described her approach as "I came, I saw, I took possession" and of course that got me to wondering what that ...
4
votes
2answers
152 views

“How do you do?”

How to ask "How do you do?" in Latin. Quomodo te habes, is it common? What other common greetings for the "How are you?" exist? I have seen: Quomodo es? Quid agis? Quomodo te habes?
2
votes
1answer
46 views

Translation of “the past shall live” into Latin

I am translating the motto, "The Past Shall Live" into classical Latin. Currently, I have Praeteritum Vivet, which I think makes sense, but I'd appreciate the input of those more skilled than I.
1
vote
1answer
62 views

Elit Scelerisque Mauris Pellentesque Pulvinar - Could some one please help to translate this

Could someone please help to transtale "Elit Scelerisque Mauris Pellentesque Pulvinar" to English? Many thanks and best regards, Phuong
0
votes
1answer
78 views

Asking a teacher for more (hopefully extra credit) homework

Salvete, Sodales! I'm a student in his second year of Latin study, but my class has been slow in reading our texts and I've been bored from the beginning. I want to ask my teacher to give me more ...
5
votes
2answers
345 views

Translating “newsletter” or “bulletin”

Is there any analogue of English newsletter or French bulletin in Latin?
2
votes
0answers
30 views

What order of the cases did the Romans use when declining nouns? [duplicate]

In modern books, two orders of the cases can be found: nom, gen, dat, acc, abl, and nom, acc, gen, dat, abl. Which one did the Romans use? Or did they use some entirely different order?
2
votes
0answers
60 views

Discere and Studere

When "discere" can be synonymous with "studere"? I read an old book saying that: "discere" and "studere" aren't usually synonymous, but they can be in some particular contexts. I'd like to know in ...
4
votes
1answer
69 views

Use of the chiasmus in Latin

Was the chiasma common in Latin? Or an uncommon figure of speech? (Words in a sentence with the pattern ABBA or ABBCBBA, etc...) Where could we meet the greatest amount of chiasma? In poetry? In ...
4
votes
0answers
83 views

Difference between dexter/sinister and rectus/laevus?

Is there a difference between the pair dexter/sinister (right/left) and rectus/laevus? I was only aware of the pair dexter/sinister until recently, when I learned that chiral molecules in molecular ...

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