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6
votes
1answer
165 views

Translation of “auxilium nullum secundum”

I have tried to translate "auxilium nullum secundum" to English through Google but it doesn't appear to capture the true meaning. This is an organizational motto on a patch (military patch) ...
5
votes
1answer
108 views

Are there ever separate number and case markers in Latin?

It seems to me that in Latin the case endings in singular and plural have very little in common. For an example of singular–plural pairs: puella–puellae, puellam–puellas, puellae–puellarum, puellae–...
3
votes
1answer
60 views

Is this a proper construction?

I am nearly certain that this is off-topic for being too specific, but I have no idea where else on the wide internet to even go. SPLENDIDIS MENS MEA Affectionately written on a piece of jewelry, ...
7
votes
1answer
236 views

What is Peniculus insinuating with his reference to Samian crockery?

Introduction and question Pl. Men. 1.2.71. Pēn. Metuis, crēdō, nē forēs sămiae sient. Pēniculus You fear, I believe, that the doors may be Samian*. * By [Henry Thomas Riley][1] translated as ‘of ...
4
votes
2answers
99 views

Translating a reflexive pronoun in a sentence with accusative

Translating a sentence from Vieta's In artem analyticen isagoge (available here) I'm having trouble: Et hic se praebet Geometram Analysta, opus verum efficiundo post alius, similis vero, resolutionem ...
8
votes
2answers
644 views

Where does the final -ς in genitive feminine singularis -ᾱς/-ης/τῆς come from?

The declination pattern for the case endings, as well as the article ὁ, ἡ, τό, seems to fairly closely match that of the grammatical endings you find in Latin: Case Latin Greek Latin Greek Latin ...
4
votes
2answers
93 views

What would be good Latin names for modern book categories?

There are various ways to order/group books in a library. By author, in alphabetical order By size By category etc. Concerning 3) we might have the following names in Latin. They might be opera... ...
4
votes
2answers
115 views

How to say “Go all the way” in Latin?

I want to know how I can say Go all the way in Latin. What I found is Ut omni modo. Is it correct? I’ll use it to say something like: Go all the way what ever this will cost you, when we are talking ...
3
votes
1answer
328 views

'His studies' in Latin

The full sentence is 'Quintus no longer enjoyed his studies,' and I've translated it as 'Quintus non longior gaudebat studiorum.' Should 'studiorum' be genitive since it expresses possession?
3
votes
2answers
99 views

Possible Latin Pun?

There is a quote from G.K. Chesterton in The Philosophy of Islands: “Did you or did you not as a child try to step on every alternate paving-stone ? Was that artificial and a superstition? Did ...
0
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0answers
29 views

Two Possible Latin Puns? [duplicate]

The first is a very endearing quote by CS Lewis, from an apology note when he forgot to meet a friend for lunch (taken from A Severe Mercy): Porcus sum, I am a pig, porcissimus, the piggest of pigs. ...
2
votes
1answer
45 views

Ubi jus ibi remedium

I am trying to make sense of the phrase ubi jus ibi remedium. It seems incomplete, and I feel I should add two verbs and something to separate the two sentences, for example: Ubi jus est, ibi est ...
4
votes
1answer
52 views

Why not future perfect in Jerome's Epistola 22?

In Jerome's Epistola 22 ad Eustochium, the famous one where God tells him that he (Jerome) is not a Christian but a Ciceronian, Jerome writes, after being whipped and then offered lenience if he won't ...
4
votes
1answer
86 views

What is a street sign in Latin?

It recently occurred to me that I don't know what to call a street sign in Latin. I know that a general word for "sign" is signum, but the dictionaries I consulted do not specify whether it ...
3
votes
1answer
79 views

Translation Help Needed in Euler's E025

Related to a previous question of mine, I'm working through the first paragraph of E025, Euler's Methodus Generalis Summandi Progressiones (available for download here). A translation has already been ...
3
votes
1answer
100 views

Is this Gerundive-Based Quote from Seneca A Direct or Indirect Question?

Introduction In his answer to Q: What is the difference in meaning/usage between "nasciturus" and "nascendus"?, Mitomino provided some interesting examples of the use of the ...
5
votes
1answer
88 views

Fourth conjugation imperfect -e

in the fourth conjugation imperfect after the stem and before the imperfect indicator there is -e. e .g. audi + e + ba +t. Where this -e comes from?
2
votes
1answer
79 views

Is there a better classical latin translation of don't let the bastards get you down? [duplicate]

Apologies for beating a dead horse but would any of these options grammatically make sense or work for 'don't let the 'jerks' grind you down' as bastard wasn't a thing apparently? I know nothis is an ...
4
votes
1answer
196 views

Two kinds of falling

The English verb "fall", when the subject is a human, has two main kinds of literal1 meaning as far as I can tell: A change of position: Moving suddenly from higher elevation to lower. (The ...
2
votes
0answers
111 views

What is the etymology of the Scythian word “hezios” meaning “covered”?

Pliny the Elder claimed, in the 6th book in the 19th chapter of "Naturalis Historia", that the name "Caucasus" comes from Scythian "kroi hezios" meaning "snow-...
4
votes
1answer
132 views

Paraphrase of Matthew 11:12 Translation

Could really use some help translating this in general, and the bolded parts in particular (not the meaning of the words so much as their function and placement in the sentence). It is supposed to be ...
7
votes
1answer
142 views

Seneca's Quaestiones Naturales Book VII [25,4] parsing question

Latinistas! I have trouble parsing a passage from Seneca's Quaestiones Naturales (Natural Questions) Book VII COMETS, [25,4] The first sentence — “Veniet tempus quo ista quae nunc latent in lucem ...
5
votes
1answer
303 views

'i have never made' in latin

I've tried to search for this phrase, but I haven't found an answer. I looked it up on google translate and it says 'nunquam fecit.' I don't think it's correct.
9
votes
2answers
721 views

Is the 'i' in 'videt' long or short?

I am currently reading Ørberg’s Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata, where he thankfully makes use of the macron to distinguish long vowels form short ones. However, and I have seen this elsewhere as well,...
2
votes
0answers
44 views

Elisum nomen ab “a fortiori”

What, if anything, is the elided noun in the phrase a fortiori? A curious variant and a curious translation I had been assuming that the full phrase is a fortiori ratione, "with stronger reason&...
5
votes
2answers
321 views

What is the difference between the accent on q and the accent on semicolon?

Background In the very helpful document ‘Typing ancient (polytonic) Greek in a Windows environment’, there is a noticable difference between the accent shown where the English keyboard Q key is, as ...
2
votes
1answer
33 views

In leviter. How to translate?

How do I translate "in leviter" in this sentence? Sensus esse videtur: ne id tantum agite ut alienorum morum censores sitis, ut facta aliorum rigide ad legem divinam exigatis & notetis, ...
5
votes
1answer
257 views

Looking for a proper translation of “life is deaf”

What I want to do I'm trying to create a statement that essentially is describing life as being deaf. Roughly in english this would be "life is deaf". The problem is that I'm trying to ...
3
votes
0answers
108 views

What would the perfect stem of 'apparere' be?

Lewis and Short only give present stem forms of the verb appărĕre, appărio. They say, quite rightly so, that it comes from ad+părĕre, and one would therefore expect the conjugation to be as that ...
3
votes
2answers
96 views

Does adjunctum mean an essential feature or attribute?

According to William Whitaker's Words it does: adjunctum, adjuncti N N [XXXCO] quality, characteristic, essential feature/attribute; collateral circumstance; However, I'm wondering if it might ...
5
votes
2answers
226 views

What does “fíat iústitia et pereat mundus” mean?

I just happened to see it somewhere & was curious what it means. Google translate says "let Justice be done, though the world perish" or "Let justice and the world perish.". I ...
2
votes
1answer
222 views

Always in the shit; only the depth changes

I came across this humorous Latin phrase on social media, rendered as: Sumus semper in excretum, sed alta variat ...but when I searched it, I realised there was a more common rendering of it: ...
5
votes
0answers
139 views

When did “si” become the standard word for “yes” in the Italian peninsula?

I am aware that classical Latin did not have words for "yes" and "no" in the same sense that English does. I know that they could express the idea of "yes" by either ...
6
votes
2answers
624 views

Vulgate Latin: usque ad pecus

St Jerome has in Gen 7:23, “ab homine usque ad pecus” but pecus is nominative (or perhaps genitive if the word is pecu) and not accusative. Am I misunderstanding something here?
6
votes
1answer
93 views

How do you say “feed on (something)” in Latin

Not the most experienced in Latin, so this may seem redundant to most, but I'm trying to figure out how to say "to feed on (something)". I'm assuming I just change the case of the object ...
4
votes
2answers
105 views

How should the phrase “in question” be translated into Latin?

I want to translate the phrase "in question" into Latin, as in: Please deposit the car keys next to the car in question, and then leave by the main door. How would I express this?
1
vote
1answer
241 views

What Benefit is Conferred by the Inclusion of a Gerundive in an Ablative-Absolute (AA) Construction?

In his answer to Q: Can Gerundives be predicates of Ablative Absolutes?, Seb offered a number of examples, the second of which: "quo senatus consulto recitato cum [populus] more hoc insulso et ...
5
votes
1answer
64 views

How to talk about a mailing list in latin?

We have (wiki with sources) new latin words for the email service (cursus electronicus or cursus publicus electronicus), a single email (litterae electronicae or electrogramma, -tis n) and email ...
9
votes
4answers
1k views

Why is this a correct sentence: “Iūlius nōn sōlus, sed cum magnā familiā habitat”?

In Familia Romana Cap. 5 there is this sentence: Iūlius nōn sōlus, sed cum Aemiliā et cum magnā familiā in vīllā habitat. I'm struggling to understand why this sentence is grammatically correct. ...
6
votes
1answer
189 views

How to learn Latin without resources in mother language

My native language is Persian. There's no good and comprehensive book in Persian for learning Latin and Ancient Greek. There is no tradition for teaching these classical languages in Iran. Also in the ...
5
votes
1answer
103 views

“nec sit terris ultima Thule” - how should terris be interpreted?

Seneca's Medea: Venient annis saecula seris, quibus Oceanus vincula rerum laxet, et ingens pateat tellus, Tethysque novos detegat orbes nec sit terris ultima Thule. I have my doubts with respect to ...
6
votes
1answer
103 views

Superlatives (Cambridge Latin Course)

I have one question about the translation of the superlatives. For some reason in Cambridge Latin Course they always give the following translation for the superlatives: laetissimus — very happy ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

Is this correct Latin, substitution in an epigram?

I have never taken Latin, but I enjoy languages, and particularly pithy quotes. There is a legal principle De minimis non curat lex, which is usually translated as “the law is not concerned with ...
8
votes
1answer
153 views

What does ἀπάλαιστος mean in Quint. Inst. 9 4.56

The quote is as such: [56] quod Cicerō optimē videt ac testātur frequenter sē quod numerōsum sit quaerere, ut magis nōn ἀπάλαιστοι. quod esset īnscītum atque agreste, quam ἔνρυθμον, quod poēticum est,...
5
votes
1answer
44 views

Why does ‘lūdīs’ end in a short syllable in Ov. Ep. Sapph. 16?

In Ovid’s Epistulae 16.152–153, the following two lines are found (‘eligiac couplet’, I believe is the term in English): mṓre tuǽ gentī́s nitidā́ dum nū́da palǽstrā̆    lū́dis et és ...
4
votes
1answer
144 views

How to say “Get well soon!”?

Salvete! My friend who loves Latin is sick and I want to tell him "Get well soon!" in Latin. Is sanesco the right verb to use here? Should I use the present or the future imperative (mox ...
10
votes
1answer
163 views

What is the earliest example of the monophthongisation of 'oe'?

Salvete amicae amicique, I have read lots of sources that state that in the 3rd Century AD. people started pronouncing the diphthong 'oe' as /e:/. However, I can't find any evidence - what I am ...
5
votes
2answers
236 views

Help on the latin term Donandi

Hello I am needing some guidance on Latin. We are rebranding our record label and we are passionate about giving back to the community. We have found the term Donandi and like it for our record label. ...
2
votes
1answer
384 views

Do these two phrases mean something different?

I need assistance in correctly identifying which statement makes sense: Nostrae Cor Jesu Fons Sapientiae or Nostrae Cor Iesu Fons Sapientiae There is a debate that the second statement is the correct ...
0
votes
1answer
39 views

Is “transfigurā penitus” the proper conjugation of the verb “transfiguro” in the context of a motto to mean “change internally”?

I am trying to describe the internal change which takes place as a person gets older or goes through a spiritual process. transfiguro and penitus are the best words I can find, transfigurā penitus is ...

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