All Questions

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0 votes
0 answers
71 views

Are monos and eis synonyms?

In Attic Greek, monos means only, alone, and eis means one. Are they synonyms? Can monos also mean one?
Tim's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
0 answers
70 views

If the city name Napoli comes from Ancient Greek "Nea Polis" (new town), why isn't it called "Gnapoli" instead?

If the city name Napoli comes from Ancient Greek "Nea Polis" (new town), why isn't it called "Gnapoli" instead? Why wasn't the 'n' at the beginning yotated by the following 'e'?
FlatAssembler's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
151 views

Have Late Latin texts using "ipse, ipsa, ipsum" as definite articles been found?

This anwser gives some examples of Late Latin texts using ille, illa, illud in ways quite similar to the usage of definite articles in modern Romance languages. However, I know that in some varieties ...
Charo's user avatar
  • 2,092
3 votes
1 answer
105 views

Should "so that" be translated as "ita ut"?

Ovid’s Amores 3.10 is a somewhat challenging poem, so I felt compelled to write a brief synopsis of a possible timeline for the events it alludes to. Cum Cerēs Proserpinam fīliam intellēxisset ā ...
Patricius's user avatar
  • 541
2 votes
1 answer
83 views

Does ὅδε (hode) refer to what follows or what precedes?

Learn to Read Greek by Keller says on p100: οὕτος [houtos] and ὅδε [hode] are both translated “this” in the singular and “these” in the plural. ὅδε [hode] however points more emphatically to people ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 1
3 votes
1 answer
467 views

What does enclitic mean here?

What does enclitic mean in Learn to Read Greek, by Keller? In Attic Greek the word tis, ti may function either as an indefinite pronoun or as an indefinite adjective. Its forms are identical with ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 1
3 votes
0 answers
101 views

Why is computatorium considered to be a better word than computatrum? (For the English word "computer")

I was watching a Luke Ranieri video in which he mentioned that computatrum isn't a very good word for computer, and that computatorium is much better, and that people should stop using computatrum. ...
Nomad1004's user avatar
  • 345
4 votes
1 answer
437 views

"Infandum me jubes Regina renovare dolorem" -- Translation

Recently I found this line adapted by Kierkegaard from the Aeneid. In this case "Regina" is a bit of a grim pun as K's fiance (the engagement with whom he had recently broken off) was called ...
Sam's user avatar
  • 41
5 votes
1 answer
86 views

Translating plant names used attributively

In English and some other languages, a plant name (or a fruit name) can be used like an adjective ("attributively"), for example apple juice, oak wood, birch bark. When translated into Latin,...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
792 views

Why does Cicero change gear in this example from the Catiline Orations?

In Cic, Catil. 2.3.5 there is: "hos quos video volitare in foro, quos stare ad curiam, quos etiam in senatum venire, qui nitent unguentis, qui fulgent purpura, mallem secum suos milites ...
tony's user avatar
  • 8,872
10 votes
1 answer
399 views

Does an enclitic -que with an interrogative pronoun ever mean "and"?

Enclitic -que generally means "and" in Latin. It's quite common to see -que paired with the interrogative pronoun quis/quid (as well as other pronouns like it, e.g. the relative pronouns qui/...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 41.7k
3 votes
1 answer
534 views

Grammar of motto "Sancte et Sapiente"

The motto of King's College is "Sancte et Sapiente", which is translated "With Holiness and Wisdom". Am I correct in understanding that two of the three words are adverbs, so a ...
Dan R.'s user avatar
  • 283
-1 votes
2 answers
90 views

How to find the transliteration of a (Attic) Greek word?

Is there a way to find the transliteration of a (Attic) Greek word in English/Latin? Also called Romanization of a Greek word, I guess? Is there a dictionary that provides the transliteration of each ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 1
-1 votes
1 answer
143 views

Loquunturne homines in Roma hodie parum Latine?

Ibo in Romam hac aestate. Loquunturne plurimi homines in ea urbe parum Latine? Comprehendantne me si rogabo eos res ut "Ubi est latrina?" in lingua Latina? Aut discenda est mihi lingua ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
114 views

Introduction in Latin

I want to find the proper correlative/translation for the phrase "introduce yourself" in latin. Can you think of the phrase? Thanks in advance.
Dachi Pachulia's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
128 views

Why aren't English "house" and Latin "casa" considered cognates? Latin 'c' corresponds to English 'h', and Latin 's' corresponds to English 's'

So, why are linguists so sure that Latin "casa" and English "house" are false cognates? Latin 'c' does correspond regularly to English 'h' (as in "centum"-"hundred&...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
894 views

Is there a relationship between καθαιρέω ("destroy") and καθαίρω ("purify")?

καθαιρέω and καθαίρω look remarkably similar and seem to have similar meanings: "destroy" and "purify/purge," respectively. It came as some surprise to me, though, that I couldn't ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 41.7k
5 votes
1 answer
541 views

What is the declension for nemo?

I have seen different ways to decline nemo. Nemo neminis nemini neminem nemine (I am not including the vocative) or Nemo nullius nemini neminem nullo Which one is correct? Has it changed ...
user's user avatar
  • 153
6 votes
1 answer
265 views

Using "u" to transliterate Greek "υ" (upsilon) into English

The typical advice that you receive, when transliterating Greek words into Roman letters, is that Greek υ (upsilon) can either be Roman "y" or "u." (See, for instance, the ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 41.7k
6 votes
1 answer
628 views

What is μέγεθος referring to in Jewish War 3.4

In the Jewish War chapter 3.4, it says: μόνον [οὖν] εὑρίσκει Οὐεσπασιανὸν ταῖς χρείαις ἀναλογοῦντα καὶ τηλικούτου πολέμου μέγεθος ἀναδέξασθαι δυνάμενον "He found only Vespasian a match for the ...
greglo's user avatar
  • 63
2 votes
0 answers
37 views

Use of fore with a perfect participle, in a sentence in Nepos Hannibal [duplicate]

The sentence from Nepos 'Hannibal' 7.3 is the Romans refusing to return hostages "...quod Hannibalem, cuius opera susceptum bellum foret, ..." Loeb, and Dickinson College Commentary, treat '...
user14099's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
92 views

Are there any unambiguous examples in Biblical or ancient Greek texts where "gymnos" means " wearing a loincloth or light tunic"?

The Latin "nudus" can mean wearing only the first layer of tunic or a loincloth. BAG says gymnos can mean wearing a loincloth. Many writers say that where the Biblical text says that Peter ...
user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
631 views

looking for help with the Latin word for "open"

I am making a shirt for our locksport group and was thinking about incorporating a take on the "Veni,Vidi,Vici" phrase. At locksport competitions it is customary to call out "OPEN" ...
PTMKS15's user avatar
  • 83
1 vote
3 answers
242 views

Deceptum is the ablative singular?

I saw a paradigm of the adjective deceptus -a -um (which is the participle of decipio) in which the neuter single ablative form is deceptum rather than decepto as we would expect. So, if this is true, ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
  • 7,077
4 votes
1 answer
279 views

What is the difference between quo and quando as relative pronoun?

Genesis 2:4 reads as follows in the Latin Vulgate: Istae sunt generationes caeli et terrae, quando creata sunt, in die quo fecit Dominus Deus caelum et terram Quo and quando were used both as a ...
Sean's user avatar
  • 141
2 votes
1 answer
328 views

Reading latin texts as a beginner

I am a beginner in Latin. I don't have a lot of vocabulary. I am trying to read a book and learning the basics at the same time. With this method, I except to have a greater vocabulary. But the ...
mle's user avatar
  • 239
6 votes
1 answer
206 views

Shouldn't this *illis* be in the genitive *illorum* in here?

In the famous Caesar's sentence: *Perfacile factu esse illis probat conata perficere, propterea quod ipse suae civitatis imperium obtenturus esset: non esse dubium quin totius galliae plurimum ...
hellofriends's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
162 views

Example request: accusative neuter nouns in any classical prose text

Is anyone able to provide me with about five sentences from any Latin classical text (one or more), excluding poetry or plays, where a NEUTER noun (any) is unambiguously employed in the accusative as ...
Harry's user avatar
  • 39
4 votes
1 answer
548 views

Translation request: DEVM ⋅ DELECTARE ⋅ DEI ⋅ LAVDES ⋅ DECORARE ⋅

Tonight my family and I were at a chamber orchestra concert, and this text was written on the underside of the harpsichord's lid: DEUM ⋅ DELECTARE ⋅ DEI ⋅ LAVDES ⋅ DECORARE ⋅ (see photo below). I'm ...
LarsH's user avatar
  • 403
1 vote
0 answers
36 views

What is the Latin word for "manifesto"?

If I wanted to speak of the Communist Manifesto or the Humanist Manifesto in Latin, what word should I use? Perhaps "praeconium communisticum", as Wikipedia suggests? If I understand ...
Victor's user avatar
  • 11
3 votes
1 answer
200 views

Incomplete word

This is in an astronomy book from 1672. I would need help please identifying the word that ends the second line and begins the third. There seems to be a misprint and a word missing its beginning but ...
Pierre Paquette's user avatar
5 votes
4 answers
569 views

Passive of verbs that take dative cases

This question originates from the following sentence by Caesar (words in parentheses are omitted in Caesar's original writing), reī frūmentāriae (Caesarī) prōspiciendum (esse) in which the compound ...
Maizi Wu's user avatar
  • 105
0 votes
0 answers
45 views

Translation of 'thinking' and 'continuously' into Latin (as used in these phrases)

I'm looking for the most "correct" translations of the following related phrases into Latin: (1) 'Thinking on it continuously' (2) 'Thinking continuously' (3) 'By thinking on it continuously'...
user14798's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
648 views

Abbreviation I haven’t seen before

Salve! In a book from 1483 there is an abbreviation or glyph I have never seen before. As the book is in Latin, I figured LatinSE was the place to ask. Has anyone ever seen this, and—more importantly—...
Pierre Paquette's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
137 views

Do these Latin phrases make sense?

So I am working on a phrase I want to put on a piece of apparel I am making. The phrase in English has two lines. In English, the lines are as follows: "The Church must always be reformed" ...
Nicholas's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
66 views

Excelsior Luminis - Making sure this translation is accurate

Higher than light is what we are trying to get across basically just trying to make sure we say and spell it in a way that makes sense for a motto/ description motto
General's user avatar
  • 31
5 votes
1 answer
109 views

Does Latin have sentences or just clauses?

When I learnt about the pronoun "suus", I was originally taught that it always referred to the subject at the start of the sentence. Having read some original Livy, I am not confused as I ...
Joyce Morley's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
381 views

Can someone explain this choice of word?

I'm reading Ανάβασις by Ξενοφών. I came across this sentence: στρατευόμενος οὖν καὶ αὐτὸς εἰς ταύτας τὰς χώρας, οὓς ἑώρα ἐθέλοντας κινδυνεύειν, τούτους καὶ ἄρχοντας ἐποίει ἧς κατεστρέφετο χώρας, ...
mike rodent's user avatar
  • 1,153
3 votes
2 answers
233 views

How do I say ''Don't do things halfway.'' in Latin?

I need to know how to say''Don't do things halfway.'' in Latin? Thank you!
Sander's user avatar
  • 31
3 votes
1 answer
125 views

How to write Fourteen in Roman numerals? (Unicode)

Preferably after ⅻⅰ/13? So it goes in "alphabetical" order.
losaline's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
116 views

Is khrysodory Athenaie the accurate way to say Athena's golden spear?

The closest I have come is khrysodory Athenaie (χρυσόδόρυ Αθηναία). Since I am piecing this together from the internet, I am uncertain if this is correct. I have also pieced together the latin, which ...
Walter's user avatar
  • 509
6 votes
1 answer
939 views

How do you say "on" as in "The book is on the table."?

So, how do you say "on" in Latin, as in "The book is on the table.". Would you say "Liber super mensa est."? I have a feeling that would imply that the book is hovering ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
148 views

PLATO BRONCE ESCUDO HISPAN TE IND REX NG 8R P

Does "Hispan te Ind Rex NG 8R P" mean something like "King of Spain and the Indies"? What would be a more accurate translation? Thank you! "PLATO BRONCE ESCUDO HISPAN TE IND ...
Maurice's user avatar
  • 133
1 vote
0 answers
46 views

"One" as pronoun in Latin? [duplicate]

How can we express the pronoun "one" in Latin when it's impersonal or indefinite? Any example: "what's your house? The white one" I know that we can use "is qui" when way ...
Antônio Silva's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
83 views

Is it permissible to use "dum" with the pluperfect subjunctive?

Is it ever permissible to use dum with the pluperfect subjunctive? Here is an example of this construction from Victor of Vita's Historia persecutionis Africanae provinciae: qui lapides dum ...
luminaetherii's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
64 views

Vowel length of the first "i" of "VIRIDIS"

Could anyone tell me if the first "i" of "VIRIDIS" (green), the one between "v" and "r", is long or short? Thanks in advance for your help.
Olavo Panseri's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
413 views

Origin of /h/ in ἅζομαι (házomai), ἁγνός (hagnós), ἅγιος (hágios)

According to Wiktionary: ἅζομαι (házomai) ← PH *haďďomai ← PIE *h₁yáǵyeti ἁγνός (hagnós) ← PH *hagnós ← PIE *h₁yáǵnós ἅγιος (hágios) ← PH *hágijos ← PIE *h₁yáǵyos I am aware of Proto-Hellenic /h/ ...
Arfrever's user avatar
  • 558
7 votes
1 answer
3k views

Why is "tyrannis" in "sic semper tyrannis" interpreted as "to tyrants"?

According to the declension in Wiktionary, tyrannis is a nominative or vocative singular form of tyrannis. So, I can see a literal translation "Thus always, Tyrant!" using the vocative. But &...
Spencer's user avatar
  • 173
5 votes
1 answer
172 views

Reading the motto of Obispado de Cuenca

There is a line of Latin handwriting on the logo of Obispado de Cuenca. What I can read is ego. julianus. dei gra coch(?) eps. with unknown diacritics. julianus is seemingly Julián de Cuenca, a ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
63 views

On the function of dignus

Usually, when we say Marcus dignus amictiā we mean that Marcus is entitled to or worthy of friendship. Keeping the direction but increasing volume we can say "Marcus (On account of his character) ...
d_e's user avatar
  • 11.2k

15 30 50 per page