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6
votes
1answer
143 views

What evidence is there for the classical pronunciation of zeta?

As I learned it back in introductory Greek, there's significant debate in the classics community about whether Classical Greek Ζ was pronounced /dz/, /zd/, /zz/, or something else. What evidence is ...
3
votes
1answer
83 views

Comparisons in Latin- does this make sense?

Here is my sentence: I'm trying to say that "The gods seemed to favor Romulus because he saw 12 vultures, twice the number of birds that Remus saw." Dii Romulō favere visi sunt quia ille ...
1
vote
2answers
73 views

Does trisyllabic laxing occur in Latin words like 'decision' before entering English?

There's a phenomenon called Trisyllabic laxing where the vowel in a stressed syllable is shortened if two (or more) syllables follow. If the stressed vowel is in at least* the penultimate syllable (...
3
votes
1answer
95 views

Difference between geminus and gemellus

Both geminus and gemellus seem to have similar meanings: twin-born, born together, twins. Is the main difference between these two words how they were used, or did they have additional meanings that ...
3
votes
3answers
120 views

What case does 'plus' take?

I don't have any information about what case to use with 'plus' (or 'magis'). In dictionaries usually only prepositions take some case, and it is showed in parentheses. In my language, 'more' takes ...
3
votes
0answers
55 views

Did Romulus and Remus have other names?

Throughout Classical times, Romans would often have several names: one person might be identified by praenomen, nomen gentilicum, cognomen, agnomen, signum, and patronymic, all together. Were Roman ...
6
votes
1answer
181 views

Do neuter plural nouns ever take singular verbs in Latin?

In Greek, it's well-known that neuter plural subjects take singular verb forms. This seems to be an old Indo-European feature, as it shows up in e.g. Anatolian languages as well. Does this feature ...
1
vote
0answers
53 views

Eppur si muove word-to-word translation [closed]

It is translated on wikipedia as "Yet it moves", Galileo Galile's words against court. But If we translate it word-to-word what does it mean?
2
votes
0answers
41 views

Semantic difference between genitive and “belong-to” adjectives

There is class of adjectives that their meaning is "belong to" "pertain to" like grammaticus. (maybe that distinction is somewhat artificial, as one can say that magnus is "...
3
votes
1answer
165 views

Agreement and possessive genitive

What we do in the following example? I need to combine two words in a phrase: 'professional' and 'holiday'. There is no adjective 'professional' in Latin or my searching is bad. So I can use the ...
2
votes
2answers
110 views

Translate “self-made” into both an adjective and a noun

I'm looking to translate the phrase "self-made" into an adjective and a noun. Unlike the English phrase where "made" doesn't mean you literally made yourself, in this case I want ...
3
votes
1answer
54 views

English translation of a philosophical quote from Spinoza in Latin

Notandum, dari necessario unius cujusque rei existentis certam aliquam CAUSAM, propter quam existit. Et notandum, hanc causam, propter quam aliqua res existit, vel debere contineri in ipsa natura et ...
1
vote
1answer
103 views

Which modern language is more similar to classical latin?

Since Spanish, Italian and French languages are all romance languages and which one of them is the most similar one to classical latin language? Is it Italian? (Rationally maybe?) EDIT1: I found this ...
6
votes
2answers
463 views

How can we distinguish “Si vis pacem, para bellum” translations?

On Wikipedia it is said that Si vis pacem, para bellum means "If you want peace, prepare for war". But I think that It also seems like "If you want peace, prepare war". What makes ...
5
votes
1answer
158 views

Translating a short sentence to Latin

I want to translate the following sentence to Latin: 'And this concludes our journey.' Here 'this' refers to the preceding text. The sentence could be paraphrased as, 'And this is the end of our ...
7
votes
0answers
70 views

Is there a pre-Christian Roman story of “coming to faith”?

Is there a story in the Roman literature of someone previously not believing in the traditional Roman gods or a specific deity within their pantheon but later, after a vision or another experience, ...
6
votes
1answer
157 views

Ethics of Spinoza: producendam

Spinoza, Ethics, De Deo, Propositio 33, Scholium 1: res aliqua impossibilis dicitur; nimirum quia vel ipsius essentia seu definitio contradictionem involvit vel quia nulla causa externa datur ad ...
5
votes
4answers
113 views

Forming compound word using “Cognitio”

Based on the existing English words describing the diet type of a species with Latin origins, I am struggling to see a clear pattern... Herbivore: "Herba" + "-vore(vorare)"? ...
2
votes
1answer
77 views

Is “tribuo” derrived from “tribus” or vice versa?

According to Wiktionary, the verb tribuo comes from tribus. But further search led me to this etymological dictionary, which in turn cites Forcelleni on those two entries; On tribuo Forcelleni writes ...
4
votes
2answers
166 views

request for translation from Latin to English

I saw following text on the back of a T-shirt: Crux sacra sit mihi lux Non draco sit mihi dux Vade retro Satana, Numquam suade mihi vana Sunt mala quae libas, Ipse venena bibas Image of the print: ...
3
votes
0answers
82 views

What fresh hell is this?

“What fresh hell is this?” is a question frequently uttered (or so it has been reported) by writer Dorothy Parker, on such occasions as when the doorbell or the telephone rang, expressing her ...
7
votes
2answers
2k views

“Tu quoque, Brutus, mi fili?” Grammar question

Someone told me these were Caesar's actual last words. Google confirms this. But I can't find an explanation for what looks to me like weird grammar. First of all, shouldn't "Brutus" be &...
3
votes
0answers
28 views

What are the meanings of servus and minister in ecclesiatical latin?

Reading the answers to another question I thought about the meaning of servus and minister in christian/ecclesiastical latin. It seems to me that in classical latin servus related clearly to the legal ...
2
votes
2answers
139 views

How do I say, “In pursuit of Truth, Beauty, and Goodness”?

I know "Truth, Beauty, Goodness" is "Veritas, Bonitas, Pulcritudo." But do I need an "et" before "Pulcritudo"? When do you use and's in Latin? And how would ...
7
votes
2answers
783 views

What is the meaning of “the new darkness” in Latin?

I am looking for a Latin phrase for The new darkness as in the arising of a negative political movement, a "new" darkness. The best I can find is tenebrae ex hodiernae as if "born ...
1
vote
0answers
34 views

Romans and Ancient Greek language [duplicate]

Is there evidence in the inscriptions, that Romans have realised, that Hellenic languages are very close to theirs own language!? It seems to be that the distinguish was applied to the Etruscan ...
4
votes
0answers
45 views

Trying to get a three-word phrase correct

In my job I am asked to put a figure (for the time a job will take) on pieces of work (complex software), for the Sales department to then convince customers to buy. Often the Sales department come ...
4
votes
2answers
217 views

Sentence translation “ … videat, annon implacabilem Deum quoque sit experturus”

In De differentiis verborum, under the entry of Clemens, Pompa contrasts that word with placidus, and right afterwards writes: Sed implacidus, qui nullo placamine ad placabilitatem promovetur, ut se ...
5
votes
4answers
422 views

Translation for “Humbly yours in Christ”

I am trying to find the correct translation for, "humbly yours in Christ" to put at the end of a letter. Would the translation "humilitate tua in Christo" be somewhat close? I have ...
9
votes
1answer
1k views

What does “tom. i.” mean?

I'm seeing the following abbreviation in several book/manuscript citations, particularly in religious works, but I have no idea what the abbreviation means. From the context of where I'm finding it, I'...
5
votes
2answers
109 views

What is the best Greek word for a thrown knife?

In the Netflix show The Umbrella Academy, one character has a limited form of telekinesis: he can manipulate the movement of knives that he throws. If I wanted to give this ability a pretentious Greek ...
3
votes
0answers
30 views

Ascend “by”, should it be ablative?

In music, a "comma" is a rough unit of intonation. If I were to refer to a refrain which had globally ascended a comma compared to the previous time it occurred, does it make sense that it ...
7
votes
1answer
852 views

Olympic oath : The crown or death (?)

In a Wikipedia article about the Olympics, I read the following sentence (my translation) Finally, the pleasure of participating is alien to the Greek ideal, for which only victory is worth winning, &...
4
votes
1answer
90 views

Translating “to care for each other” into Latin

I have a friend. She and I have strong loyalties to each other -- we have a semi-unspoken agreement to be always forthright with and always supportive of one another, and I want to express this ...
4
votes
5answers
251 views

“lovesick” = ? in Latin

How does one say "lovesick" in Latin? It's "malato d'amore" in Italian. Is it "malus amoris"? Or would that mean more "malicious love"?
7
votes
2answers
223 views

What is the source of the Greek phrase πύξ, λάξ, δάξ?

πύξ, λάξ, δάξ "by punching, kicking, and biting" is described by Wikipedia as an "epigram describing how laypersons were chased away from the Eleusinian Mysteries". Where is this ...
2
votes
0answers
62 views

Latin diphthongs, vowel qualities

There is one existing question on the SE (search for 'ae pronunciation'), but there are nothing equal to my interests. My googling returned to me nothing too. So, maybe somebody here know: nowadays ...
5
votes
0answers
75 views

Well, well, well

How to say this expression in Latin!? Expressing surprise: Well, well, well! It is here (when smth lost and found)! Expressing sarcasm: Well, well, well... And what now!? Expressing begining: Well, ...
6
votes
2answers
117 views

Confusing syntax in two sentences

I seem to be confused by the constructions of these two sentences from a Medieval Latin text: Unde vocum alia suavis est illa, scilicet quae subtilis, spissa, clara et acuta est. and Multiplicem ...
5
votes
2answers
756 views

How do I easily type Greek letters on Windows 10?

I have only ever used English language settings for keyboards and Operating Systems. As I am starting to learn Greek, I would like to be able to easily type in it. What is the easiest way to enable ...
4
votes
2answers
540 views

What is the translation of “Cashless Society” into Classical Latin?

The world seems to be moving this way, so how would Romans in the classic era have translated the phrase "cashless society". I am ignoring the fact that they didn't use paper money for ...
3
votes
1answer
107 views

Ancient Greek: how to distinct true and false diphthongs?

Ok, this is not about false diphthong /ou̯/(ου), 'cause it split with long /uː/ (but anybody know a certain time of this spliting? In Wiki this describes simple "at early times") and ...
7
votes
2answers
143 views

Translate “Look me in the eyes” (dative of possession vs possessive adjective vs accusative pronoun)

There are basically 3 approaches: Specta mihi in oculos Specta me, in oculos Specta (in) oculos meos Probably, there is no "correct" translation, but maybe there is more natural and ...
9
votes
1answer
174 views

How did the fourth declension neuter dative singular become different from the non-neuter ending?

Usually, when a neuter case ending is different from the non-neuter ending in the same declension, the difference is in the nominative or accusative case (e.g. -us and -um in the second declension ...
4
votes
1answer
144 views

Ethics of Spinoza - forte ea de causa

Spinoza, Ethics, De Deo, Propositio 28, Scholium: Sequitur quod Deus non potest proprie dici causa esse remota rerum singularium nisi forte ea de causa ut scilicet has ab iis quas immediate produxit ...
4
votes
0answers
62 views

Passage from Odington

I am looking at a short passage from Odington's treaty on music, and am unsure about the last bit, particularly the meaning of "abiectus" in this context. I admit to having limited skill reading Latin-...
3
votes
0answers
50 views

How we can monitor the size and impact of “Living Latin Community”

By "Living Latin community" I refer principally to those individuals who want to use Latin language in the actual-life for whatever reason they have (the main reason is probably in order to learn). ...
4
votes
1answer
55 views

How would you translate “united by mathematics” into Latin?

How would you translate "united by mathematics" into Latin? Is the translation "civitatum a mathematica" correct? By "united" I mean united people.
2
votes
1answer
84 views

Looking for help translating four words for a business motto please

I'm in the process of setting up a new reiki business and would like to have my motto in Latin. I have already translated the words with a dictionary and Google so just wanted to make sure that what I'...
9
votes
2answers
1k views

Marsupial blackletter difficulty

I believe I have all of this except one word (please correct any errors): Reperitur hic animal habens reserva_____ quo suos pullos secum portat et eos uon nisi lactandi tempore emittit. Tale regi ...

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