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4
votes
2answers
54 views

Follow up “It's not a bug, it's a feature”

Following up Help translating "It's not a bug, it's a feature!"?, non erratum sed designatum came up as a great way to say "not a wrong step, but working as designed" as in ...
6
votes
1answer
239 views

Finding the original Latin text of Seneca (“No tree becomes rooted and sturdy unless many a wind assails it.”)

In what text of Seneca will I find the Latin for the statement, one English translation of which is, "No tree becomes rooted and sturdy unless many a wind assails it."
9
votes
2answers
1k views

Why is Antirrhinum written with two 'r'?

According to Wikipedia Antirrhinum (Dragon flower) is derived from ἀντί anti "against, like", and ῥίς rhis "nose". Therefore, I would expect it to be pronounced Anti-rrhinum (with ...
5
votes
1answer
96 views

Genitive case: why “litterarum vetustatem” and not “litteras vetustatis”

From time time I encounter a pair of nouns; one noun is in a genitive case, apparently modifies the other, but where I expect them to behave differently. examples: memoriae tradere litterarum ...
4
votes
1answer
58 views

“Project Management” in Latin

I was looking for a translation for "project management" and its adjacents (project manager etc.). There's surprisingly few direct translations for "project", but I've managed to ...
1
vote
1answer
59 views

I am looking for the Latin translation for 'these are the good times' As in enjoy right now and live in the moment. can anyone help?

I am looking for the Latin translation for 'these are the good times' As in enjoy right now and live in the moment. can anyone help?
4
votes
1answer
156 views

Why is Certainty to be Expressed by the Present Subjunctive?

In North & Hillard Ex. 209 the following is to be translated into Latin: The general delivered this speech before his men: "You see how great the forces of the enemy are, and how impregnable ...
8
votes
2answers
640 views

Is “Jacob” genitive in “jubilate deo jacob”?

"Jubilate deo Jacob" is translated everywhere as "rejoice unto the god of Jacob". But from what little I know, Jacob is not in the genitive case. May I ask if this was a ...
2
votes
1answer
81 views

How to translate a variant of 'Per aspera ad astra'

How would you translate 'through the will of man to the stars' or 'through the indomitable human spirit to the stars'(more accurately, the latter)? Of course, I'm not looking for a literal translation,...
8
votes
1answer
3k views

Help translating “It's not a bug, it's a feature!”?

I know no Latin, but playing around with Google Translate I came up with "Non insectum opus est". Insectum seems like a good stand in for a generic bug, but maybe blatta is better (see http:/...
1
vote
1answer
71 views

Does this Latin phrase convey a meaning?

I'd like to utilize Homines Ludente, Homines Impudente as an epigraph. But I'm not sure whether it conveys a meaning. Thanks for your help!
4
votes
2answers
423 views

In “fortis fortuna adiuvat” is “fortis” accusative plural?

Fortis fortuna adiuvat, is fortis accusative plural here? Fortis has different forms for the same conjugation as I see at Wiktionary, and I couldn't find which forms adiuvare takes as an exhaustive ...
5
votes
1answer
86 views

Is there a dictionary that actually shows the verb patterns?

Is there a Latin dictionary that actually show the verb patterns? Patterns like Adiuvare + accusative somebody Ire + dative location Otherwise I only see the examples and it is not possible to ...
6
votes
1answer
71 views

In Latin, is there an “adjective form of nation name” vs genitive “of nation name” distinction?

In Latin, is there an “adjective form of nation name” vs “of nation name” distinction? In English we can say “Church of Rome” or “Roman Church”, or “Embassy of Germany” or German Embassy”, or “Prime ...
15
votes
1answer
1k views

Abbreviations used by Romans in their inscriptions

While watching a documentary, I came across this Roman tombstone of three Jewish freedmen (below is the image): The expanded transcription available online is, L(ucius) Valerius L(uci) l(ibertus) ...
3
votes
0answers
57 views

Gildersleeve's latin grammar or Kennedy's Revised Latin Primer?

Which one is more complete, Kennedy's Revised Latin Primer of Gildersleeve's grammar?
8
votes
1answer
342 views

Why does “Hominem unius libri timeo” use comparativus unius instead of positivus unum?

Why does "Hominem unius libri timeo" use comparativus unius instead of positivus unum? Does it mean "I fear a man of one book (more)"? Or does that unius belong to hominem because ...
6
votes
1answer
120 views

What are some notable works never translated from Latin?

I guess most, if not all, of classical-period works that have survived, were translated. But I'm certain many of the medieval era works were never published in a language other than their Latin ...
2
votes
1answer
79 views

Translation of “Trying is the first step towards failure”

A somewhat famous quote by Homer Simpson: Trying is the first step towards failure How would this be translated into Latin? Both a direct translation and/or a shortened version capturing the essence ...
5
votes
1answer
124 views

Is “Nihil Labore Difficile” good grammar?

The slogan adopted by my old school had adopted was the Latin phrase nihil labore difficile. They claimed that it meant that "nothing is difficult with hard work". However, is this slogan ...
3
votes
1answer
42 views

What to call an “academy research fellow”?

I started today in a new position called "academy research fellow". The title means that I hold a specific five-year grant aimed for research and starting a research group, and is roughly ...
4
votes
1answer
415 views

“Finit hic, deo” – is the movie translation correct?

Is it correct that “Finit hic, deo” translates into “God ends here” like they say in the movie “The Nun”? (The scene in the movie where the phrase is seen and the translation is given can be viewed ...
6
votes
1answer
115 views

What is the meaning of the suffix -ox as in ferox?

I have found different explanations for the meaning, but they all seem contradictory. It shows exaggeration of an existing adjective (atrōx < āter) It shows exaggeration of an existing verb (fĕrox ...
3
votes
1answer
86 views

How to translate “Wise words about life” into latin?

As it is said on title, how to translate "Wise words about life" into latin? Edit: Answer to Nickimite Some examples about wise words as I mean: nanos gigantum humeris insidentes nulius in ...
4
votes
1answer
72 views

Deponent verb participle gender

If we consider a deponent verb such as arbitrārī in the perfect tense, hence arbitrātus sum/es/est, is the participle arbitrātus supposed to be declined like a regular adjective? For example if one ...
36
votes
3answers
7k views

Could all soldiers in the Roman army actually speak Latin?

I am under the impression that men for the legions of the Roman Empire were conscripted across the empire, and so Latin could not have possibly been the first language to every soldier. But could all ...
7
votes
3answers
369 views

Use of accusative instead of ablative with 'pro'

I saw written in a coat of arms "PRO MARE NOSTRVM", but we all know that the preposition "pro" takes ablative, so the right form would be "PRO MARI NOSTRO" wouldn't it? I ...
13
votes
1answer
478 views

Why are so many Latin men's names (cognomina) in the usually-feminine first declension?

The first declension, with the -a ending, is usually feminine. Why are so many men's names (cognomina), however, in the first declension -- Seneca, Cinna, Aggrippa, Sulla, and more? This is far out of ...
3
votes
1answer
101 views

What is the best translation for 'Future Earth'?

Using Google and other online dictionaries I came up with 'Terrae Futurum'. Is this the best way to present the idea of how the Earth could look in the distant (billion years) future?
4
votes
1answer
103 views

Use of 'eo' in a sentence

I am trying to translate the following from a work on philosophy: Manifestabo tibi, quod radii, qui fluunt ab unaquaque substantiarum, non sunt praeter intellectum substantialitatis, etsi sint vires, ...
5
votes
1answer
98 views

Creating a Latin motto

I want to craft a Latin motto for a literary work. This motto would mean "I seek peace, I make war by duty". I thought about this: "Pacem adfecto, officiosus bellum gero". I have ...
6
votes
2answers
93 views

The use of et…et and the following grammar

Salvete omnes, doctissimi amici et amicae, a question rose from Orberg LLPSI I, where it says: "Iam et Marcus et Quintus mala habent." Why would he use the accusativus pluralis of malum when ...
5
votes
1answer
146 views

Correct pronunciation of full Latin dates

What is the correct Latin pronunciation of modern full dates, where the word 'anno' is omitted e.g. 'die 24 Augusti 1954 nata'? In which case stands the numeral of the year? Is the word 'anno' ...
3
votes
1answer
147 views

μολὼν λαβέ but in Latin

What would be a Latin phrase similar to the sentiment supposedly expressed by Leonidas the first in 'MOLON LABE' "come and take them" in response to Xerxes demanding the Spartans to lay down ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

Do any Greek words have stems ending in labiovelars?

I know that Ancient Greek lost its labiovelar consonants at some point before alphabetic writing caught on. We know of the labiovelars' previous existence mostly because of different reflexes in ...
7
votes
0answers
134 views

Can Veneti and Antuerpiae be vocatives?

I am puzzling over: caveat veneti et antuerpiae exemplo tiri et tu lundina This was written in the margin of a sixteenth-century commentary on Isaiah at chapter 23, which is on Tyre. My translation ...
3
votes
1answer
174 views

Problems with Plautus (“quem patrem, qui servos est”)

In "Captivi" Act 3, Scene 4 (Plautus), between lines 40-45 there is the following dialogue: HEGIO: plus quidem quam tibi aut mihi nam ille quidem, quem tu hunc memoras esse, hodie hinc abiit ...
3
votes
1answer
36 views

Is this the correct metric to Virgils Georgics II, 459?

agrícó/las quíbús /ipsá pró/cul dis/cordíbús/ armis Is this correct? I tried to indicate the short syllables with the accents. I would appreciate your answer very much!
8
votes
1answer
186 views

Quem or quid when asking what something is buying?

I am not sure whether to say "Quem emit Iulius?" or "Quid emit Iulius?" if I want to know what Julius is buying. I know the interrogative pronoun should be in the accusative case ...
3
votes
2answers
92 views

“you should know how to do it by now”

How to render the English should when in the sense of "it is expected" rather than hortatory command or "it behooves". Examples to illustrate the meaning I'm looking for: A: "...
7
votes
1answer
270 views

Did Latin ever have a rule of lengthening vowels in monosyllables ending in /s/?

I was surprised by the following portion of "Exceptions to rhotacism", by Kyle Gorman (2012): Latin has a bimoraic minimal word requirement, implemented by a process of Subminimal ...
5
votes
1answer
116 views

How to translate this part of Te lucis?

I am trying to translate part of the Te lucis ante terminum (Revised Latin text) I have trouble translating this: Præsta, Pater piíssime, Patríque compar Unice, cum Spíritu Paráclito regnans per omne ...
11
votes
2answers
761 views

What is the diminutive form of “Insula”?

I recently had to look for various diminutives from latin words, however I got stuck when I had to find the diminutive for "Insula". After many researches on the Internet I came across some ...
5
votes
3answers
432 views

abortio < ab- (away from) + orto (rising)?

Is the etymology of abortio (n.) or aborior (v.) from ab- (away from) + orto (rising), in the sense that it abruptly cuts off the progress ("rising") of something?
6
votes
0answers
112 views

On the syntax of some datives in a beautiful Ciceronian structure

I was wondering if you would like to share your thoughts on the grammar of the datives in the following texts from Cicero. The second example is a very interesting one provided by Kingshorsey in an ...
4
votes
1answer
68 views

Translating “quarente ostium” to English

The official blazon of the University of Nottingham describes ... inscribed with the words 'Quarente Ostium', ... for which I can not find a proper translation. I'm pretty sure ostium here refers to ...
4
votes
0answers
87 views

ad obsidionem urbis vs. ad obsidendam urbem

I was wondering to what extent the two Prepositional Phrases (PPs) in the title of the present question can be taken as functionally equivalent. Consider the following text about Caesar's siege of ...
4
votes
1answer
436 views

Translating “cum chordis corda, cum fidibus fides”

I’m having trouble understanding the following construction: cum chordis corda, cum fidibus fides It is taken from a German manuscript by Dietericus mentioning that the human body should be like a ...
5
votes
1answer
396 views

“Ego me omnium hominum beatissimum tot annos putabam”: Why annos is accusative here?

In the beginners-book "Julia" by Maud Reed we find this sentence: "Non falsa," inquit, "Solon, vir sapiens, dixit. Ego me omnium hominum beatissimum tot annos putabam. Nunc ...
4
votes
0answers
58 views

Why do some sources give the principal parts in a different order, or include an extra, fifth principal part?

Many online sources state categorically that ordinary (non-deponent, non-defective) Latin verbs have four principal parts. It is often also implied that they have a fixed order (1st pers. sgl. ...

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