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4
votes
2answers
213 views

Sentence translation “ … videat, annon implacabilem Deum quoque sit experturus”

In De differentiis verborum, under the entry of Clemens, Pompa contrasts that word with placidus, and right afterwards writes: Sed implacidus, qui nullo placamine ad placabilitatem promovetur, ut se ...
5
votes
4answers
400 views

Translation for “Humbly yours in Christ”

I am trying to find the correct translation for, "humbly yours in Christ" to put at the end of a letter. Would the translation "humilitate tua in Christo" be somewhat close? I have ...
9
votes
1answer
1k views

What does “tom. i.” mean?

I'm seeing the following abbreviation in several book/manuscript citations, particularly in religious works, but I have no idea what the abbreviation means. From the context of where I'm finding it, I'...
5
votes
2answers
105 views

What is the best Greek word for a thrown knife?

In the Netflix show The Umbrella Academy, one character has a limited form of telekinesis: he can manipulate the movement of knives that he throws. If I wanted to give this ability a pretentious Greek ...
3
votes
0answers
30 views

Ascend “by”, should it be ablative?

In music, a "comma" is a rough unit of intonation. If I were to refer to a refrain which had globally ascended a comma compared to the previous time it occurred, does it make sense that it ...
7
votes
1answer
846 views

Olympic oath : The crown or death (?)

In a Wikipedia article about the Olympics, I read the following sentence (my translation) Finally, the pleasure of participating is alien to the Greek ideal, for which only victory is worth winning, &...
4
votes
1answer
86 views

Translating “to care for each other” into Latin

I have a friend. She and I have strong loyalties to each other -- we have a semi-unspoken agreement to be always forthright with and always supportive of one another, and I want to express this ...
4
votes
5answers
246 views

“lovesick” = ? in Latin

How does one say "lovesick" in Latin? It's "malato d'amore" in Italian. Is it "malus amoris"? Or would that mean more "malicious love"?
7
votes
2answers
217 views

What is the source of the Greek phrase πύξ, λάξ, δάξ?

πύξ, λάξ, δάξ "by punching, kicking, and biting" is described by Wikipedia as an "epigram describing how laypersons were chased away from the Eleusinian Mysteries". Where is this ...
2
votes
0answers
57 views

Latin diphthongs, vowel qualities

There is one existing question on the SE (search for 'ae pronunciation'), but there are nothing equal to my interests. My googling returned to me nothing too. So, maybe somebody here know: nowadays ...
5
votes
0answers
71 views

Well, well, well

How to say this expression in Latin!? Expressing surprise: Well, well, well! It is here (when smth lost and found)! Expressing sarcasm: Well, well, well... And what now!? Expressing begining: Well, ...
6
votes
2answers
115 views

Confusing syntax in two sentences

I seem to be confused by the constructions of these two sentences from a Medieval Latin text: Unde vocum alia suavis est illa, scilicet quae subtilis, spissa, clara et acuta est. and Multiplicem ...
5
votes
2answers
602 views

How do I easily type Greek letters on Windows 10?

I have only ever used English language settings for keyboards and Operating Systems. As I am starting to learn Greek, I would like to be able to easily type in it. What is the easiest way to enable ...
4
votes
2answers
538 views

What is the translation of “Cashless Society” into Classical Latin?

The world seems to be moving this way, so how would Romans in the classic era have translated the phrase "cashless society". I am ignoring the fact that they didn't use paper money for ...
3
votes
1answer
105 views

Ancient Greek: how to distinct true and false diphthongs?

Ok, this is not about false diphthong /ou̯/(ου), 'cause it split with long /uː/ (but anybody know a certain time of this spliting? In Wiki this describes simple "at early times") and ...
7
votes
2answers
134 views

Translate “Look me in the eyes” (dative of possession vs possessive adjective vs accusative pronoun)

There are basically 3 approaches: Specta mihi in oculos Specta me, in oculos Specta (in) oculos meos Probably, there is no "correct" translation, but maybe there is more natural and ...
9
votes
1answer
166 views

How did the fourth declension neuter dative singular become different from the non-neuter ending?

Usually, when a neuter case ending is different from the non-neuter ending in the same declension, the difference is in the nominative or accusative case (e.g. -us and -um in the second declension ...
4
votes
1answer
143 views

Ethics of Spinoza - forte ea de causa

Spinoza, Ethics, De Deo, Propositio 28, Scholium: Sequitur quod Deus non potest proprie dici causa esse remota rerum singularium nisi forte ea de causa ut scilicet has ab iis quas immediate produxit ...
4
votes
0answers
59 views

Passage from Odington

I am looking at a short passage from Odington's treaty on music, and am unsure about the last bit, particularly the meaning of "abiectus" in this context. I admit to having limited skill reading Latin-...
3
votes
0answers
48 views

How we can monitor the size and impact of “Living Latin Community”

By "Living Latin community" I refer principally to those individuals who want to use Latin language in the actual-life for whatever reason they have (the main reason is probably in order to learn). ...
4
votes
1answer
53 views

How would you translate “united by mathematics” into Latin?

How would you translate "united by mathematics" into Latin? Is the translation "civitatum a mathematica" correct? By "united" I mean united people.
2
votes
1answer
84 views

Looking for help translating four words for a business motto please

I'm in the process of setting up a new reiki business and would like to have my motto in Latin. I have already translated the words with a dictionary and Google so just wanted to make sure that what I'...
9
votes
2answers
1k views

Marsupial blackletter difficulty

I believe I have all of this except one word (please correct any errors): Reperitur hic animal habens reserva_____ quo suos pullos secum portat et eos uon nisi lactandi tempore emittit. Tale regi ...
0
votes
0answers
57 views

Best Latin Websites to learn/revise/practice tests

I was wondering what the best websites for (a) learning latin and (b) revising/doing practice tests are? More specifically, I was wondering if anyone happened to have or know where I could find some ...
4
votes
0answers
90 views

To what extant there was a difference between written and spoken Latin?

Particularly in terms of word-order in sentence. I doubt, for example, if we would hear sentence like this: "Tarda solet magna in rebus adesse fides" (Ovid) where we have Tarda and fides gapped ...
1
vote
1answer
139 views

Does this sentence in Latin make sense?

I'm having some trouble with indirect speech and was wondering if my answers to these questions are correctly worded. Quid Priamus ante Pyrrhō praedīxit quam periit? Priamus praedixit deos ...
8
votes
1answer
2k views

Is there a relationship between the word amor (love) & mors (death)?

I recently read in a book that there is an etymological relationship between the Latin words amor & mort but no citation is given. Looking at an online etymological dictionary (Wiktionary) did not ...
5
votes
1answer
76 views

Colonna as cognomen

I am working on the Italian Renaissance soldier Stefano Colonna. How would his name be written in Latin, as a label or signature, Stephanus? What is the proper genitive for "of the Colonna family"? ...
3
votes
1answer
46 views

Are there any general rules for creating 'proper' Latin neologisms, beyond matching gender, number, and case?

For the sake of this question, I'm going to be using this definition of neologism, "A newly coined word or phrase." From my understanding, the loose etymology of this word is the French neo plus Greek ...
3
votes
1answer
71 views

Vowel hiatus and non-diphthong vowel pairs (compared to Romance languages)

Classical Latin's 6 major diphthongs are clear-cut, phonologically speaking. We know ae is pronounced as one phoneme, such as in [ˈsae̯.pɛ], "saepe." However, we often come across words that have 2 ...
6
votes
1answer
434 views

Is x considered one consonant or two?

We know that letter x is pronounced "cs" ("ks") i.e. as two consonants. But it is still one letter. When it stands between two vowels, is the first syllable considered open or close?
6
votes
1answer
156 views

Can “sum” and “nemo” work together to create a phrase meaning “I am no one?”

I have been trying to understand the relationship between "sum" and "nemo", to create a phrase meaning something like "I am no one". In all the contexts I personally ...
5
votes
1answer
66 views

Where does the -τ- come from in the oblique stem of some Greek neuter nouns with nom/acc sing forms in -ς?

I just learned that some Greek neuter nouns of the third declension with a nominative/accusative singular form ending in -ς have oblique stems in -τ-, which surprised me. I expected τ-stem neuter ...
1
vote
3answers
105 views

What would “kiwi” be in Latin? [closed]

What would kiwi be in Latin? Both the bird and the fruit. I guess there's no actual word because I don't think they had kiwis, but what would you guess it to be if you had to use it?
10
votes
2answers
732 views

How to decline a whale?

The Latin word cētus (a whale or some other major sea creature) behaves peculiarly. In singular it is a normal-looking masculine cētus, but in plural it is a neuter cētē. The ...
-2
votes
1answer
41 views

How does the subjunctive "under' + 'join'?

[Etymonline:] ... from sub "under" (see sub-) + iungere "to join" (see jugular). ... [OED:] ... The subjunctive mood was so called because it was regarded as specially appropriate to ‘subjoined’ ...
3
votes
1answer
41 views

What exactly does the prefix 'in-' signify, in 'impartire'?

It seems that the Latin verb impartire (more commonly impertire) means "to share with another, to communicate, bestow, impart". The English verb impart comes from this. What does the prefix in- mean ...
3
votes
1answer
137 views

Redundancy of “quo” with “de”

Passage: “Quo de genere mortis difficile dictu est.” Cic. Amic. 12 English translation (from Loeb): “It is hard to speak of the nature of his death.” French translation : “Quant à la nature de sa ...
3
votes
1answer
51 views

Description of Eurus in Ovid's Metamorphoses

Here's a quote from Ovid's Metamorphoses 1.61-2, where he talks about Eurus, the east wind: Eurus ad Auroram Nabataeaque regna recessit Persidaque et radiis iuga subdita matutinis I've translated it ...
3
votes
2answers
151 views

Translate fictional location and book into Latin

I'm not an English speaker and I don't know many definitions and "big" words in that language, so forgive me for speaking like a barbarian. I have no knowledge of Latin, but I want to make some ...
2
votes
2answers
73 views

Why is Novarupta feminine?

Today is the anniversary of the Novarupta eruption, the largest volcanic eruption of the 20th century. Nova rupta is of course good Latin for "new broken thing", where the thing in question is ...
2
votes
1answer
75 views

sentence analysis - usage of ambo

In the beginning of the first Dialogue ("Surrectio Matutina") in Linguae Latinae Exercitatio of Juan Luis Vives we read: Beatrix: Jesus Christus exuscitet vos a somno vitiorum. Heus pueri estis ne ...
16
votes
3answers
1k views

Is any animal neuter in Latin?

The word animal itself is neuter in Latin, but at least all of the common animal species seem to be masculine or feminine (or common gender): canis, feles, equus, pardus, leo/leaena, lupus/lupa, ursus/...
2
votes
1answer
82 views

19th century Latin textbooks?

What textbooks were used to teach Neo-Latin in primary, secondary, and higher education schools during the 19th century?
2
votes
1answer
112 views

Res vs Obiectus

What is the difference in meaning between Res and Obiectus( is it merely a matter of Language evolution Classical vs Medieval)? As a meaning I am interested in that which (the thing that) is related ...
5
votes
2answers
94 views

What does “aut asphodelos aut nullus” mean?

Would anyone be able to tell me what "aut asphodelos aut nullus" means. I've tried automatic translators without success. This is a tag from a 1942 novel by Michel Innes (who went in a lot for that ...
5
votes
0answers
93 views

How old is Ecclesiastical Latin Pronunciation?

Salvete, I have trying to research how old the Ecclesiastical Pronunciation of Latin is. To be more precise, I mean the Italianate pronunciation, called 'La Pronuncia Scolastica' in Italian. Many ...
3
votes
0answers
60 views

What is a “camarilla” in Latin?

The Spanish word camarilla means a group of conspirators meeting in secret to manipulate the political leadership. It's been borrowed into English, as well as quite a few other Romance languages, ...
4
votes
2answers
91 views

Is there an explanation for this word order?

This website has the Liturgy of the Hours online. The closing prayer for Laudes and Vespers is (line break mine): Dominus nos benedicat et ab omni malo defendat et ad vitam perducat eternam. ...
7
votes
2answers
179 views

Subjunctive with adverb “quam”

Passage: “Quam autem civitati carus fuerit, maerore funeris indicatum est.” Cic. Amic. 11 My translation in English: «Moreover, how dear he was to the citizenry was indicated by the grief of his ...

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