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25 views

Can I label an admission as an “ex post facto mea culpa” in this case?

I would like to perform a mea culpa and "admit" that I'd given advice that in hindsight might have been suboptimal as it didn't sufficiently address all possible future outcomes. So calling ...
8
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2answers
182 views

“£30,000? Murders have been committed for a lot less.”

In an old TV-prog. (1950s), "The Annals of Scotland Yard", old cases were dramatised with a narration from distinguished criminologist, the late Edgar Lustgarten. One of these, from the ...
4
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1answer
111 views

“Washington, DC” in latin

Is there a more-or-less commonly accepted translation of "Washington, DC" (i.e., the city, but I would assume the same word would work for the state) in contemporary-latin? I'll happily use ...
5
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1answer
920 views

frater < “fere” + “alter”?

Is the etymology of the word frater from fere (almost) + alter (another), in the sense that a brother is more closely related to his sibling than another, unrelated person? St. Isidore's Etymologies (...
6
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2answers
666 views

Quidquid veto non licet, certe non oportet

I'm trying to translate this sentence, but I'm not sure how. It looks like either veto is the dative (substantive?) meaning 'old', or it's the verb veto, 'I stop from happening'. With 'non licet', I ...
7
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1answer
1k views

What is “capult”?

There is a Tertullian quote in one of the editions of Gibbon (see the asterisked note here for the original). Nam proximè ad lenonem damnando Christianam, potius quam ad leonem, confessi estis labem ...
1
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0answers
52 views

On the (necessary or typical?) relationship between double accusative and causation

I was wondering if there is a syntactic/semantic generalization that can account for the so-called "double accusative" predicative frame in Latin (verbs with person & thing (docere ...
7
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1answer
283 views

Is ὀργίζω, to anger, cognate with ὄργια, a secret rite or ritual?

Is ὀργίζω, to anger, cognate with ὄργια, a secret rite or ritual? Wiktionary has a red link from the uncommon modern word to a not-yet-existing page for the ancient word (with accents). It seems at ...
4
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0answers
112 views

On the alleged ambiguity of the Ablative Absolute “Mutatis mutandis”

According to the wikipedia entry of Mutatis mutandis, "Mutatis mutandis is a Medieval Latin phrase meaning 'with things changed that should be changed' or 'having changed what needs to be changed'...
6
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2answers
543 views

Translating the title of a thesis about energy storage into Latin

How do I translate the title of my dissertation thesis into Latin? Energy storage: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells, Renewable-Hydrogen integration for home usage Here is my best try: Energy praeclusio: ...
9
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2answers
715 views

Word order in Virgil's Aeneid - why so scrambled?

I can understand why Virgil would like to use standard devices like chiasmus and synchysis to create poetic effect in the Aened. But sometimes the word order is scrambled up so much, I can't work out ...
5
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1answer
64 views

iuvare ut + subjunctive

In English, I might ask you to "help me [to] do" some task. Would the most (classically) idiomatic Latin equivalent be an ut clause (e.g., "iuva ut faciam ...")? My only reason for ...
4
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2answers
97 views

Is “evidenter” the correct translation for “obviously!”?

I've searched the forum but found no answer to my question. How would one say obviously in Latin? As in answering a question with a "it's option b, obviously!" Online dictionaries have given ...
6
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1answer
51 views

Words for dogs, puppies, and small dogs in koine, and their connotations when applied to humans

Modern Greek has σκύλος for "dog," which is derived from ancient σκυλαξ, meaning "puppy." The generic word for a dog in ancient Greek was κυων. There is also a diminutive κυνάριον, ...
3
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2answers
211 views

Sentence with gerund or gerundive and infinitive

I'm trying to translate the following: [...] quem autem valorem aliter nisi appropinquando cognoscere non datur. Which comes from Euler (De Serie Lambertina/e). But I'm having trouble sorting out ...
1
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1answer
91 views

How to translated preposition + ing in Latin?

How to translate sentences like "before doing X" in Latin since ante requires an accusative?
1
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1answer
84 views

Suffixes and different stem words in transversarium and transversus?

The difference between transversarium and transversus confuses me, this occurs with processus (masculine) transversus foramen (neutri) transversarium where the endings, sus and sa-ri-um, are ...
4
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0answers
52 views

Names for digits or numbers

How would you say "I write zeroes and ones" or "I need a fiver" or "the number seven" in Latin? There are a couple of cases where in some languages one uses instead of a ...
10
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4answers
1k views

What is a good font for both Latin with diacritics and polytonic Greek

Previous questions and outline of needs Several questions have been asked, especially for polytonic Greeek – especially ‘What are popular fonts for polytonic Greek?’ and ‘Greek font with legible ...
2
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0answers
68 views

Translating Internet vernacular + 'disorder' into Latin

Newbie to Latin here. I thought it might be amusing to translate web slang into Latin, but this raised a few questions. If the accuracy is lacking, please let me know how! LOLUMADCUZUBAD? Turbati ...
5
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1answer
94 views

Seize your future

What would "Seize your future/the future" be in Latin? I've got Carpe futurum, but my latin is quite poor. I want to use it as a motto for an educational company. I want to use it as it ...
6
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3answers
4k views

How do I say Disney World in Latin?

How do I say Disney World in Latin? I googled it but I’m still not sure. Disney Mundi? Disney Mundum?
6
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1answer
707 views

What construction is “διδαχή?”

There is an interesting early Christian document called the Διδαχή, translated into English as "The Teaching." The word seems to be classical, not just Koine. Is this some kind of more ...
6
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1answer
111 views

Can valeo be used transitively?

Looking through the entry in Lewis & Strong, I couldn't find any mention of the accusative being used with valeo, except as the object of certain prepositions. However, the following use of magna ...
5
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1answer
727 views

Can anyone explain what I did wrong scanning this line of Argonautica?

I was looking over some practice tests and came across this question: What is the scansion of the first four feet of "Atque haec impressō gemuit miseranda cubīlī" Based on my knowledge, I ...
2
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3answers
84 views

What are the best translations of “Take it as it goes” and “go forward in the light/ Ever forward in the light”

For take it as it goes I have this so far "Ut áuferant eam abscedit" or " Accipiant illam" althought I don't know how accurate either is is. For go forward in the light I have &...
5
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2answers
198 views

Participal plunder: How should ‘animum concentū’ and ‘ex aequō dēmulcēns’ be interpreted?

I am assisting someone working on Bonifaccio’s work on dance, and the following quote from Lucian (The Dance) came up, here with my translation attempt (only on the Latin part) and notes to the same: ...
10
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0answers
77 views

Why is “porticus, porticūs” a feminine fourth-declension noun?

The fourth declension was one of the less common inflection pattern for Latin nouns, and the vast majority of fourth declension nouns are masculine nouns ending in the deverbal abstract noun suffix -...
4
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0answers
58 views

What does “Mus. Reg. Gall.” stand for?

Gibbon, at the end of a note detailing the imprinting on a medal, has "(Mus. Reg. Gall.)". I have found other references outside Gibbon, and have gotten (maybe) as far as "Mus. Regis ...
7
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1answer
193 views

Maria mater Domini

The phrase "Maria mater Domini" appears in Pseudo-Papias Fragment X (A fragment attributed by J.B. Lightfoot to Papias of Lombardy, 1040s–1060s, author of the Elementarium Doctrinae ...
5
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1answer
163 views

Flee or chase, the meaning of fugere?

In reading Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles, I find the following passage: Dum tamen ea geruntur, Argonautae nōn intermissō remigandī labōre mox ē cōnspectū hostium auferēbantur, neque prius fugere ...
2
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2answers
107 views

TRANSLATION “In the midst of the darkness, the light persists”

What would be the most correct translation into Latin of the phrase: "In the midst of darkness, the light persists", I have found on some sites: IN MEDIA TENEBRIS LUCEM PERDURAVERIT, but I ...
5
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3answers
181 views

What was the decision regarding this Paris convent in 1561?

This is the decision of the General Chapter of the Dominicans regarding some trouble in the Paris convent in 1561. Fratres vero Antonium Abeli magistrum et Dominicum Sergent ut indignos denegamus, ...
6
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1answer
86 views

Who minted this Roman coin, celebrating the sentencing of Vestal virgins?

This coin is part of a presentation done by University of Glasgow in relation to a seminar on coinage and numismatics. The coin is introduced in a video done by the Hunterian Museum, and I have found ...
6
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1answer
240 views

Regency of πίνω in Anacreon's ode Πάντα πίνει

The following poem is from the Odes of Anacreon: ἡ γῆ μέλαινα πίνει, Πίνει δὲ δένδρε’ αὐτήν Πίνει θάλασσα δ’αὔρας, Ὁ δ’ἤλιος θάλασσαν, Τὸν δ’ἤλιον σελήνη. Τί μοι μάχεσθ’ ἑτῖροι, Καὐτῷ θέλοντι πίνειν; ...
4
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1answer
120 views

Usage of perfect infinitive (“Res mihi nondum comperta est, itaque sufficiat leviter admonuisse alios de hac quarta causa”)

In Kepler's Strena, seu de Nive Sexangula we read: Res mihi nondum comperta est, itaque sufficiat leviter admonuisse alios de hac quarta causa. which I translate as: This thing is not yet ...
4
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1answer
129 views

A process now in progress, with no agent

Suppose I want to say: Maybe your appetite is a sign of returning health. One possibility: Fortasse orexis tua sānitātem portendit revertentem. I'm not sure that revertor carries this metaphor as ...
2
votes
1answer
119 views

Latin for “Stand upon the heavens” and “Surpass the gods”

How can I translate following sentences to Latin: Stand upon the heavens and Surpass the gods, both having somewhat close and similiar meanings in English. I am looking for something that reflects ...
4
votes
1answer
81 views

What exactly does “incipientem” mean in this phrase?

Salvete, From the Vulgate, Acts 23:27: 27 virum hunc conprehensum a Iudaeis et incipientem interfici ab eis superveniens cum exercitu eripui cognito quia Romanus est "This man, being taken by ...
7
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1answer
389 views

What form is 'numerārī'?

In chapter X of Orberg's Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata there is this sentence: Piscēs numerārī nōn possunt. From the context I would translate this as an infinitive. But the infinitive should be ...
1
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1answer
41 views

How should this infinitive clause and this ut clause translate?

The sentence from Euler's De Serie Lambertina I'm working on now has the following form: Praesenti autem forma hanc seriem exhibere est visum, ut litterae A et B inter se permutabiles evaderent, ita ...
3
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0answers
59 views

Protego Causa in Sanctus and In causa Sanctus

How can I say "I'm in a saint cause"or "a noble cause". Like studying for example, or acquiring knowledge in science is a noble cause, so I can say that I'm pursuing or I'm in the ...
2
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2answers
73 views

On the formation of perfect passive infinitives

I Think I understand why the passive infinitive of " amo " is not " esse amatus" : "being loved" is not perfect ( without any play on words). So we need something else ...
5
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1answer
200 views

Verb + esse + predicate nominative

Pueri debent esse boni Habitus vero mediocritatis intelligitur esse liberatio hominis a dispositionibus subiectibilibus Why are boni and liberatio nominative? It seems to me that they ought to be ...
2
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1answer
66 views

Translation Request, English to Latin

How can I translate this sentence to Latin, "Man in the palace! Remember death, live with fear of death. Leave us alone." I translate like that but... I don't know, I guess, I did a mistake. ...
4
votes
2answers
71 views

How to translate “there are few absolutes”?

In order to translate the sentence "there are few absolutes" into Latin I thought about: res absolutae paucae sunt. I introduced the word res since I did not find a latin substantive that is ...
3
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1answer
52 views

What are the Roles of “Quin” and “Sit” in “fieri non potest quin sit”?

In the question on Sherlockian logic, Batavulus, in his answer gave an alternative translation of the clause "it must be believed"/ "one must believe it", which is: "fieri ...
3
votes
2answers
120 views

Usage of fugio as an idiom to mean forget

I am confused how fugio is used grammatically when it is used idiomatically to mean forget. In Latin the regular word for forget is dedisco (to unlearn). However, usually the Latins used various ...
1
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1answer
49 views

Putting the virus in its place!

My schooldays Latin is very rusty! please help with translating 'pneumonia and the virus are losers' Sunt should go at the end? Victus should be plural and accusative? Thank you!
7
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1answer
371 views

Why is “Onus” in the Dative Case?

North & Hillard Ex. 211: a general addresses his soldiers as an approaching enemy is about to encircle them. The following is to be translated into Latin: "But since the enemy are already ...

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