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8
votes
1answer
176 views

Quem or quid when asking what something is buying?

I am not sure whether to say "Quem emit Iulius?" or "Quid emit Iulius?" if I want to know what Julius is buying. I know the interrogative pronoun should be in the accusative case ...
3
votes
2answers
88 views

“you should know how to do it by now”

How to render the English should when in the sense of "it is expected" rather than hortatory command or "it behooves". Examples to illustrate the meaning I'm looking for: A: "...
7
votes
1answer
248 views

Did Latin ever have a rule of lengthening vowels in monosyllables ending in /s/?

I was surprised by the following portion of "Exceptions to rhotacism", by Kyle Gorman (2012): Latin has a bimoraic minimal word requirement, implemented by a process of Subminimal ...
5
votes
1answer
112 views

How to translate this part of Te lucis?

I am trying to translate part of the Te lucis ante terminum (Revised Latin text) I have trouble translating this: Præsta, Pater piíssime, Patríque compar Unice, cum Spíritu Paráclito regnans per omne ...
11
votes
2answers
752 views

What is the diminutive form of “Insula”?

I recently had to look for various diminutives from latin words, however I got stuck when I had to find the diminutive for "Insula". After many researches on the Internet I came across some ...
5
votes
3answers
431 views

abortio < ab- (away from) + orto (rising)?

Is the etymology of abortio (n.) or aborior (v.) from ab- (away from) + orto (rising), in the sense that it abruptly cuts off the progress ("rising") of something?
6
votes
0answers
96 views

On the syntax of some datives in a beautiful Ciceronian structure

I was wondering if you would like to share your thoughts on the grammar of the datives in the following texts from Cicero. The second example is a very interesting one provided by Kingshorsey in an ...
3
votes
1answer
46 views

Translating “quarente ostium” to English

The official blazon of the University of Nottingham describes ... inscribed with the words 'Quarente Ostium', ... for which I can not find a proper translation. I'm pretty sure ostium here refers to ...
4
votes
0answers
86 views

ad obsidionem urbis vs. ad obsidendam urbem

I was wondering to what extent the two Prepositional Phrases (PPs) in the title of the present question can be taken as functionally equivalent. Consider the following text about Caesar's siege of ...
4
votes
1answer
429 views

Translating “cum chordis corda, cum fidibus fides”

I’m having trouble understanding the following construction: cum chordis corda, cum fidibus fides It is taken from a German manuscript by Dietericus mentioning that the human body should be like a ...
5
votes
1answer
394 views

“Ego me omnium hominum beatissimum tot annos putabam”: Why annos is accusative here?

In the beginners-book "Julia" by Maud Reed we find this sentence: "Non falsa," inquit, "Solon, vir sapiens, dixit. Ego me omnium hominum beatissimum tot annos putabam. Nunc ...
4
votes
0answers
54 views

Why do some sources give the principal parts in a different order, or include an extra, fifth principal part?

Many online sources state categorically that ordinary (non-deponent, non-defective) Latin verbs have four principal parts. It is often also implied that they have a fixed order (1st pers. sgl. ...
8
votes
1answer
130 views

What is the correct way to say “Unknown music from the South” or “Unknown musicians from the South” in latin?

I'm about to publish a series of electronic music releases from three up-and-coming Australian producers/musicians. I thought I'd name the series as a word play or reference to "Terra Australis ...
2
votes
1answer
60 views

So God may be glorified as we serve

Help. Can anyone translate this to Latin? "So God may be glorified as we serve."
3
votes
1answer
67 views

Online classes for learning Classical Latin

Does anyone have any recommendations on online video classes for learning Classical Latin? I have bought courses on Udemy.com, for example, for web development and saw that there are a few different ...
4
votes
1answer
68 views

When did genuine and spurious diphthongs merge?

In Ancient Greek, the diphthongs ει and ου were sometimes considered "genuine" (they descended from ε+ι or ο+υ or the like), and sometimes "spurious" (they descended from ...
4
votes
0answers
134 views

What was the latin command to plunder?

After the Gallic Wars, there existed a commanders order to plunder the cities of the vanquished. What was that Latin command?
10
votes
2answers
2k views

How to say “To serve, not to be served” in Latin?

I would like to know how to translate the phrase "To serve, not to be served" in Latin. It doesn't have to be a word for word translation. But, I want to know the phrase that would give the ...
6
votes
1answer
288 views

Translation of a sentence by Darwin

Multiply, vary, let the strongest live and the weakest die. -- Charles Darwin I translated this sentence by: Crescite, mutate, fortissima vivite, alia morimini. -- Carolus Darwin However, I am not ...
5
votes
0answers
44 views

How do I access the PHI 5.3 corpus through CLTK?

CLTK (the Classical Languages ToolKit) seems to contain several tools to work with the Packhum Latin corpus. However, the actual setup process seems to require the use of several different tools, none ...
3
votes
2answers
131 views

How do you say “one more [something]”?

Answers to the question Latin version of "non ho che un" or "je n'ai qu'un" suggest that English more than one can be translated to Latin as plus unum (even though there ...
7
votes
2answers
386 views

Translation of devom

I'm looking to find the translation of devom. I have looked for a translation online and in dictionaries and come up empty. In Arthur Machen's The Great God Pan he quotes an inscription: DEVOMNODENTi ...
6
votes
1answer
190 views

Imperative of sum - es or esto?

The imperatives of sum/esse (to be) are sg. es/esto and pl. este. When do we use es? And when esto?
4
votes
1answer
154 views

Euler passage translation (Latin in 18th century)

I would like to include a translation of a brief passage from Euler's music text Tentamen novae theoriae musicae (1739) in an article I am writing, but find the original somewhat tricky to work with. ...
5
votes
1answer
91 views

When is quis used instead of aliquis?

I definitely remember that one usually says: si quis veniret … and not: si aliquis veniret. But the recent question about quo quisque est sollertior and similar forms brought the following rule from ...
7
votes
1answer
126 views

What does the Latin name Vectaerovenator inopinatus of the new dinosaur mean?

I just saw in the news that a new dinosaur species was discovered and its scientific name is Vectaerovenator inopinatus. What exactly does this name actually mean as a Latin word? How should I parse ...
6
votes
1answer
220 views

The function of “quo” in “Quō quisque est sollertior, hōc docet īrācundius”

In A&G on indefinite pronouns there are two sentences of a similar structure: Bonus liber melior est quisque quō mâior. (The larger a good book is, the better.) Quō quisque est sollertior, hōc ...
1
vote
1answer
48 views

Carpe sciurum (sieze/harvest the squirrel?)

Would 'carpe sciurum' be a functional translation of 'seize the squirrel'? (As in to 'harvest' or 'pluck' the squirrel?)
10
votes
1answer
447 views

Numbering of persons

It is conventional to number the three persons of Latin and Greek and many other languages so that the first person is the speaker, the second one is the listener, and the third one is anyone else. ...
2
votes
2answers
101 views

Translation request: that which has no remedy, is is already remedied

That is meant to say "that which is unfixable is already fixed" or "if there is no solution, there is no point in worrying about it." (is it ok to ask for a translation like so? ...
6
votes
1answer
148 views

The referent of “illa” in this passage?

What is the referent of "illa" in the passage below from Simon Episcopius's Institutiones theologicae and how would it be translated? Nec dicam operose de Theologiae, quas vocant, speciebus,...
8
votes
1answer
112 views

Roman's color and emotion association

I'm interested in account of colors associated with emotions. It might be an explicit passage by a Roman, sporadic sentences (like: "he became green out of envy) or relics to be found in ...
9
votes
2answers
965 views

Why does Catullus use “odi” instead of “odio” in Catullus 85?

I think the question is straightforward, "odi" to me appears to be the imperative while "amo" is the singular 1st p. Is this some construction I am unaware of with "et"?
4
votes
1answer
150 views

What is “formatting” in Latin?

I would like to adapt the proverb dē gustibus nōn est disputandum ("there's no accounting for taste") to refer to formatting—the layout of text on a page, the font selection, the use of ...
6
votes
1answer
338 views

How to say “Happy Sabbath”

In our community we use to say "Happy Sabbath" or "Have a Blessed Sabbath" which have the same sense like "Shabbat Shalom", regarding to Saturday as the day of rest. What ...
10
votes
1answer
147 views

What is the closest Latin equivalent to the modern conception of “(nuclear) family”?

When translating the word "family" into Latin it seems obvious to go to "familia". However, multiple sources (most quoting Richard Saller) tell me that "familia" derives ...
2
votes
1answer
91 views

¿Was “grosso modo” popularised from Latin or Italian?

Grosso modo is a phrase of Latin origin, meaning "approximately". The phrase has been adopted in many languages (like English, French, Dutch, etc), as the referred link testifies. The ...
2
votes
1answer
100 views

Space Force Motto: Semper supera or semper supra?

This came up recently and as far as I understand it, supera is correct, not supra. Partly because supera has the dual meaning of above (preposition) and space, or celestial (neutral noun). Supra on ...
3
votes
1answer
75 views

What are the meaning of these sentences? Christiani victores obsessi

I am trying to translate the chapter titles of four chapters in a medieval source, Caffaro's De Liberatione Civitatum Orientis. Here is the full table of contents: Here are the four chapters I wish ...
4
votes
0answers
31 views

French certification for Latin

I have been learning Latin on my own for many years and would like to teach private lessons. For this it would be useful to have a level certification or examination results. Is there anything like ...
4
votes
4answers
213 views

Latin version of “non ho che un” or “je n'ai qu'un”

At least Italian and French have an idiomatic way to say "I have only one friend": Non ho che un amico. Je n'ai qu'un ami. Finnish has the same thing: "Minulla ei ole kuin yksi ystävä....
2
votes
0answers
51 views

Translation of natus est in morte

I thought this means born in death but I’m not sure. Can anyone help me out I never studied Latin seriously
2
votes
1answer
81 views

participium coniunctum vs. ablative absolute of transitive deponent verbs

I was wondering why the "active meaning" and the transitivity of deponent perfect participles like cohortatus in (1) are not (?) preserved in the Ablative Absolute in (2). Why is it the case ...
3
votes
1answer
70 views

How can a computer tell the difference between I and J?

Most modern editions don't distinguish vocalic I from consonantal J. Most of the time, this doesn't create any real ambiguity. However, for certain purposes it can be useful to know the difference: ...
10
votes
2answers
1k views

Does Latin have any words for specific numbers apart from the numbers themselves (akin to the English “dozen”, for example)

In English, many numbers have specific words that denote them, distinct from the number itself. For example "dozen" means group of 12; "gross" means 144; and "score" ...
4
votes
0answers
102 views

Are any phonemic distinctions not represented in Latin?

Latin orthography seems to have been relatively phonemic. In other words, if long vowels are marked somehow (macrons or apices), there seems to be a straightforward mapping between letters and ...
1
vote
0answers
71 views

What is the meaning of “cin” in the phrases “petras omnes cin cum…”?

So I've been trying to figure out the Latin lyircs in "Hellfire" from the video game Final Fantasy XV. It's really hard to make out what they're saying, and the only part that I've managed ...
4
votes
1answer
164 views

Latin influences in Spanish

Spanish has a lot of influences from Latin. One of them is the -ar, -er, and -ir verbs. Accordding to http://spanishlinguist.us/2013/10/the-origins-of-spanish-ar-er-and-ir-verbs: ""Latin’s -...
7
votes
4answers
358 views

Does D/L variation go back to a dl cluster?

As outlined here in “Indo-European *d, *l and *dl” by Tim Pulju, there’s a hypothesis going back to Hamp 1972 that the l in Latin lacrima and d in the archaic variant dacruma both represent a dl ...
3
votes
1answer
53 views

A list of common different spelling-variants

The beginner (like me) might occasionally find a word he is not familiar with. It is usually easy to retrieve the base-form (nom. or stem for a verb) and find it in a dictionary. Even more, there are ...

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