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11
votes
2answers
1k views

Deliberately ambiguous translation of “Songs of the wild dog”

I am translating the phrase "Songs of the wild dog" into Latin, and I have the following: Canti Cantus Canis Feri For context, this is the title of a music album I am working on. Aside ...
6
votes
0answers
65 views

Semantic link between πόνος and πονηρός?

Πόνος means toil or suffering, while πονηρός, derived from it, can mean either that someone toils under oppression or else is knavish, base, or evil. What is the semantic link between toil/suffering ...
5
votes
2answers
182 views

How would you translate the title “A Song of Ice and Fire” into Classical Latin?

I've seen "Carmen Glaciei Ignisque", but I have some doubt with the use of genitive here. Can someone help me find examples from classical works that support the use of genitive? Or find an ...
8
votes
1answer
185 views

“Condere vaginae gladium” – locativus?

Salvete congerrones eruditissimi, modo legi in lexico Latino-Germanico a Henrico Georges confecto (opus Germanicum illi a Lewis & Short conscripto simile atque satis compar) sub lemmate «vagina» ...
4
votes
2answers
500 views

Quem quaeritis?

Different versions of the Visitatio sepulchri, have different line endings. Some use Christicole whereas elsewhere I have seen Christicolae. What is the difference between Christicole/Christicoles/...
8
votes
1answer
186 views

When did Old Latin develop initial stress?

The stress system of Classical Latin is thought to have been preceded by a period of fixed initial stress. When did that earlier system arise, replacing the inherited Proto-Indo-European mobile accent?...
28
votes
1answer
7k views

Why did so many Romans name their children after ordinal numbers?

Why were so many praenomina ordinal numbers or apparently derived from ordinal numbers? A few examples: Octavia Minor (Augustus Caesar's older sister) Octavia Major (Augustus Caesar's older half-...
7
votes
1answer
1k views

Is this word “manuducant” a typo or an obscure word?

I have the following sentence from Euler's De Serie Lambertina (I've already asked half a dozen questions about this paper), and one of the words manuducant (manvdvcant), shown in the snippet below, ...
6
votes
1answer
205 views

Is quod too ambiguous for “that which”?

I'm trying to write a variation of Ovid's phrase "Omnia mutantur, nihil interit" — "Everything changes, nothing perishes". So far I've came up with "quod mutat, non pereat&...
5
votes
1answer
101 views

Translation of Meditations 1.4-5

I've been using the meditations of Marcus Aurelius as practice in reading and translation, and then checking my answers by peeking at a translation by George Long. In 1.4, Marcus Aurelius says: Παρὰ ...
8
votes
3answers
184 views

What type of purpose clause for specifying a substantive gerundive

When using a substantive gerundive, what form would a specifying purpose clause take? For instance: "things to be used for fighting," I would use a gerundive (utenda) and then what? A dative ...
7
votes
1answer
154 views

Why is the subjunctive used in Vergil's Georgics, 3,250?

Vergil's Georgics, book 3, line 250, reads: nonne vides ut tota tremor pertemptet equorum corpora si tantum notas odor attulit auras. Why is the subjunctive mood used here? And what is this ut?
4
votes
1answer
243 views

What is the the etymology and origin of the word/name Calvus?

Doing research (the question was also asked here as well) I came across the name having a French origin meaning "bald". However, I also came across that the name has a connection to the ...
0
votes
0answers
62 views

Did “interpolare” mean “polish up” or “polish among”? Why wasn't sup- used?

Does inter- mean "up" as Ayto vouches below? Is Etymonline wrong that inter- means "among, between"? Why didn't Latin use sup-, the prefix for "up", here? interpolate [...
5
votes
3answers
925 views

Translation of very old tombstone

I'm trying to figure out writing on one very old tombstone that I found near church. The text has some abbreviations so I'm having hard time figuring out which word is being hidden behind ...
1
vote
1answer
51 views

How to say…“ Focus and Persevere”..in classic latin

I am creating a motto on an emblem, and I want to use that phrase.....Focus and Perservere.....in Latin as my motto. Hence the need for the phrase in classic Latin.
6
votes
2answers
364 views

Act 1, Act 2, … in a play, in Greek

In an ancient Greek play, what word would we use to refer to the different acts? Μέρος? Λόγος? Woodhouse doesn't seem to have anything relevant under the noun "act."
3
votes
1answer
83 views

Confusing translation for Euler

In this sentence from Euler's De Serie Lambertina, I'm having trouble deciphering the meaning (§ 20, p. 40): At vero quomodo vicissim series Lambertina ad aequationem trinomialem perduci queat, ...
8
votes
4answers
2k views

Are “μπ” and “ντ” indicators that the word didn't exist in Koine/Ancient Greek?

I am learning Modern Greek on Duolingo, in the hopes that it will help me learn Koine and Ancient Greek, eventually. I have also watched a few other videos, like this one: https://www.youtube.com/...
4
votes
1answer
69 views

Looking for the most accurate translation of “Remember and Persevere”

I'm looking for a nice Latin phrase to put on my college class ring. Being honest: college was a pretty rough time for me, but I've pulled through a lot of hardships and I'm gonna be the first of my ...
4
votes
2answers
404 views

What is the difference in meaning between `nil` and `non` in “Primum non nocere”?

The wikipedia entry for "Primum non nocere" mentions that it's sometimes written as "Primum nil nocere". I realize the shade of difference is probably pretty fine, but is one of ...
6
votes
1answer
152 views

Double accusative in abdico (abdicare cibum aliquem)

In several dictionaries I encountered under abdico (1st conj.): Abdicare cibum aliquem (Plin.) to prohibit the use of any meat as not good (Thomas Thomasius dictionary) Abdicare cibum aliqem (Plin. ...
0
votes
1answer
121 views

How does “ad-” work in adduco and allego?

I'm grappling with the prefix ad- in Latin. I don't know why, but I can't pinpoint its meaning. Or it just feels redundant. Here are some examples of my befuddlement. The ad- in adduco feels ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

Why did Latin prefix a(d)- to vis(um)?

In other words, why didn't visum itself shift to mean "opinion"? What does ad- contribute to this semantic shift? advice [13] Like modern French avis, advice originally meant ‘opinion’, ...
-1
votes
1answer
53 views

How does “send to” mean “allow to enter”?

Ayto doesn't expound the shift from "send to" toward "allow to enter"? I don't understand the "hence". admit [15] This is one of a host of words, from mission to ...
4
votes
1answer
249 views

How did “dis-” contribute to the meaning of “directus”?

Ayto doesn't expound how *addrictiāre shifted to mean "direct something, such as a letter, to somebody". address [14] Address originally meant ‘straighten’. William Caxton, for example, ...
8
votes
0answers
203 views

How would you say “The Etruscan language died two thousand years ago and nobody understands it.” in Etruscan?

What do you think, is "𐌓𐌀𐌔𐌄𐌍𐌀𐌋⸱𐌖𐌓𐌔𐌑𐌉𐌍𐌉⸱𐌋𐌖𐌐𐌖𐌂𐌄⸱𐌇𐌀𐌍𐌕𐌉⸱𐌆𐌀𐌈𐌓𐌖𐌌⸱𐌅𐌏𐌛⸱𐌀𐌅𐌉𐌋𐌀𐌓𐌉⸱𐌍𐌀𐌍𐌀𐌕𐌍𐌀𐌑⸱𐌉𐌍𐌂⸱𐌇𐌀𐌌𐌈𐌉𐌍." (transliterated: "Rasenal ursmini ...
8
votes
2answers
1k views

The best way to say Sinners

I'd like to create an aesthetic with the phrase "Remember that you must die, sinners" - targeted at the viewers. I know the first part is memento mori, but what is the best translation of &...
3
votes
1answer
980 views

Why didn't Latin grammarians ever rectify their Latin mistranslation of “(ptōsis) aitiatike” as “accusare”?

Didn't any Latin grammarian catch their own mistake? If the answer is no, I'm dumbstruck. How did they miss such a giant mistake? Did anyone try to implement and popularize the more correct ...
6
votes
2answers
467 views

Translation of lucis mortiat / reginae gloriae

I am currently in the process of writing a review and I stumbled over these two Latin phrases in the lyrics that make scratch my head a bit. Lucis Mortiat (death to the light) Reginae Gloriae (glory ...
4
votes
2answers
297 views

Why no relative pronoun in ἄνθρωπος ἐξηραμμένην ἔχων τὴν χεῖρα?

Mark 3:1 has: Καὶ εἰσῆλθεν πάλιν εἰς συναγωγήν, καὶ ἦν ἐκεῖ ἄνθρωπος ἐξηραμμένην ἔχων τὴν χεῖρα. In English word order, the final part seems like it would be "a man his hand had had withering.&...
9
votes
2answers
440 views

Meaning of “τρίχας” in Anacreon's Περι Γέροντος

Here's a poem from Anacreon's Odes: ΠΕΡΙ ΓΕΡΟΝΤΟΣ Φιλῶ γέροντα τερπνόν, Φιλῶ νέον χορευτήν. Γέρων δ᾽ ὅταν χορεύῃ Τρίχας γέρων μὲν ἐστιν, Τὰς δὲ φρένας νεάζει. From what I've found, τρίχας is the ...
1
vote
1answer
77 views

Multiple singular nominatives as a collective subject

Can multiple singular things act as a collective subject? I am trying to understand the following expression from Horace: fama decus divitiis parent So, fama and decus are both singular nominatives. ...
4
votes
3answers
150 views

Translating “The joy of understanding is the highest/greatest pleasure”

I'm self-taught Latin student and I wanted to translate the following sentence: The joy of understanding is the highest/greatest pleasure. I used the word "highest" there because I wanted ...
4
votes
2answers
425 views

Tables of Greek expressions for time, place, and logic

I'm trying to build my vocabulary in koine using flashcards, and so far have had pretty good success attaining a decent level of reading fluency, e.g., I can get through the first couple of chapters ...
6
votes
2answers
153 views

What does causa procurans mean?

What is the definition of the expression causa procurans, and who may have been the originator of the term? I found this expression used by a number of people, but I haven't been able to find it ...
1
vote
1answer
81 views

How do you say “improving” or “to improve” in Latin?

How do you say "improving" or " to improve" in Latin?
4
votes
1answer
79 views

Can someone please help me translate the slogan “conservatism, consistency, materiality, full disclosure” into Latin?

I am setting up a university society for accounting. The accounting conventions are "conservatism, consistency, materiality and full disclosure". Can someone who speaks Latin, kindly ...
10
votes
1answer
748 views

How to pronounce “Roterodamus”?

The adjective roterodamus means “of Rotterdam” (the city in Holland). To lovers of Latin, unless they entertain an unusual interest in Dutch geography, the word is familiar probably primarily because ...
6
votes
1answer
151 views

Where does -ι- come from in derivatives of ἅλς (ἁλιάετος, ἁλιαής, ἁλιανθής)?

Many compounds or derivatives of the Greek word ἅλς hals "salt, sea" seem to be built on the form ἁλι- hali-: ἁλιά(ι)ετος "sea-eagle", ἁλιαής "blowing seaward", ἁλιανθής &...
3
votes
1answer
42 views

Create new word: super + portare

I want to create a new word by analogy to "support" with the prefix super-. According to Google the modern English word "support" comes from Latin supportare and is composed of sub-...
5
votes
2answers
89 views

Silly question. Need a translation for a character name. Are you familiar with “Firefly”?

I'm rolling a character-sheet and I'd like to call the fellow Browncoat, lIke the fans of Firefly. I think it would be Fulvus Tunicus for a reddish brown coat as a name but (for reasons too ...
7
votes
3answers
418 views

Why is the first person singular the citation form?

In both Latin and Greek, the most common citation form for a verb is the first person singular present indicative active. In other words, dictionaries will generally be indexed by amō and λύω rather ...
7
votes
1answer
136 views

What is the difference between ἀρχαῖος and παλαιός?

What is the difference between the two adjectives ἀρχαῖος and παλαιός? In particular, what word would fit the best to mean "history" between ἀρχαιολογία and παλαιολογία?
3
votes
1answer
112 views

What is the word for knowledge in Greek?

I read that there are two version depending on intrinsic value. So that it is either intellectual knowledge or divine knowledge, knowledge from within. And is there a difference between Ancient Greek ...
6
votes
1answer
748 views

Why the π in ἀπιεῖ?

I wanted to pick a -μι verb to use as a paradigm to memorize for Homeric and koine, so I thought I would use ἀφίημι. I looked up the present-tense conjugation on U Chicago's morpho utility, and then ...
3
votes
1answer
46 views

Scansion of a Greek line from Babrius 20

In Babrius fable 20 it says: θεῶν ἀληθῶς προσεκύνει τε κἀτίμα. The piece is written in Choliambic style, and I can't figure out how to scan this line. The problem is that there are two consecutive ...
5
votes
4answers
449 views

How close is modern Italian pronunciation of sounds to Ecclesiastical Latin pronunciation?

I know that Ecclesiastical Latin uses Italianate pronunciation. My question is if there are any significant differences between pronunciation of modern Italian sounds vs. pronunciation of ...
1
vote
0answers
25 views

Can I label an admission as an “ex post facto mea culpa” in this case?

I would like to perform a mea culpa and "admit" that I'd given advice that in hindsight might have been suboptimal as it didn't sufficiently address all possible future outcomes. So calling ...
8
votes
2answers
182 views

“£30,000? Murders have been committed for a lot less.”

In an old TV-prog. (1950s), "The Annals of Scotland Yard", old cases were dramatised with a narration from distinguished criminologist, the late Edgar Lustgarten. One of these, from the ...

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