All Questions

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
5
votes
1answer
81 views

The verb 'utor' in gerundive constructions

I was wondering about the logic of the usage of the verb utor in gerundive constructions. The following relevant quote is from Woodcock's (1959: 164) A New Latin Syntax: "one can say ad hanc rem ...
8
votes
1answer
1k views

How to say “black market” in Latin?

How does one say "black market" in Latin? According to the OED, this word first originated in English in 1727.
8
votes
2answers
349 views

effeminare = evirare (?)

Assuming that (i) the meanings of vir and femina are indeed opposite and (ii) the meaning of the prefix ex- is quite transparent, why are the verbs evirare and effeminare then synonymous? Are there ...
5
votes
3answers
462 views

How to say “in a certain respect” in Latin?

How does one say the adverbial phrase "in a certain respect" or "in certain respects" in Latin? For example, would whatever under a certain condition is such-and-such, is such-and-...
13
votes
2answers
1k views

What would an election campaign be called in Latin?

Our site has its first election now and the voting period starts in 12 hours. Therefore it is a good moment to figure out some of the election vocabulary in Latin. What would be a good Latin word for ...
7
votes
1answer
131 views

Usage of quidquid: “dominetur piscibus aquatilibus … et quidquid in terra movetur”

In Gen. 1:26 by Sebastian Castellio: ita fatur: Faciamus hominem ad imaginem nostram, nostri similem, qui dominetur piscibus aquatilibus, volucribus aereis, pecudibus, denique toti terrae, et ...
4
votes
1answer
112 views

How do you say “anything is possible” in Latin?

If you wanted to say that anything is possible in Latin, how would you do it? One possibility I thought of was something like: Omne posse I'm not sure that omne quite captures the nuance of anything ...
7
votes
1answer
329 views

Is Greek ἀρά, prayer, cognate with Latin ara, altar?

Is Greek ἀρά, prayer, cognate with Latin ara, altar? Wiktionary had ἀράομαι, with the etymology pointing to a red-linked ἀρά. I created an entry for ἀρά based on LSJ, but I have no source of ...
8
votes
2answers
369 views

Why subjunctive mood in this sentence from a Vatican document?

In this recent question we looked at the following sentence from the apostolic constitution Provida Mater Ecclesia: § 2. Instituta, salvis communibus iuris canonici normis quae ipsa respiciant, ...
4
votes
1answer
120 views

“For all” and “there exists”

The two most common mathematical quantifiers are "for all" (∀) and "there exists" (∃). I wondered how to render them in Latin. Here is my proposal: for all x: pro omnis x for all ...
12
votes
3answers
1k views

Latin for “In war and in peace”

I remember reading long ago a pithy Latin expression for “in war and peace,” or “in war as in peace,” or something to that effect. The idea is that one might say, for example, that a certain truth ...
5
votes
3answers
484 views

Is “Ut facerem sed retro oblitus” idiomatic for “I was going to, but then I got distracted and forgot”?

I translated "I would have done it, but turned and forgot" via google translate, hoping that phrasing would be end up with a more idiomatic latin phrase. Otherwise, how do I convey the ...
3
votes
1answer
57 views

What is “A man only does something that sits easily with his conscience.” translated into Latin?

The infamous and long-discredited legal defence: "I was only obeying orders.", has become almost the traditional excuse for cowardice & brutality. Of the legal (There is a higher moral ...
5
votes
1answer
75 views

What is the meaning of “positive acceptus” in Gauss' Disquisitiones Arithmeticae §131?

From Gauss' Disquisitiones Arithmeticae §131: Sī p est numerus prīmus fōrmae 4n+1, erit +p, sī vērō p fōrmae 4n+3, erit -p residuum vel nōn-residuum cuiusvīs numerī prīmī quī positīvē acceptus ipsīus ...
4
votes
1answer
110 views

What does “Prout necessitas ferat atque experientia suffragetur” translate to in English?

What would this latin sentence mean : "Prout necessitas ferat atque experientia suffragetur" ? No idea... Note: found in this link
5
votes
1answer
410 views

Understanding the sentence “Cum avis volat, alae moventur” from LLPSI

In Cap. X of LLPSI, Ørberg introduces these three sentences: Cum avis volat, alae moventur. Cum homo ambulat, pedes moventur. Cum piscis natat, cauda movetur. While I understand the general meaning ...
4
votes
0answers
69 views

Is “Te id dicente id non fit.” good Latin for “You saying so does not make it so.”?

Is "Te id dicente id non fit." good Latin for "You saying so does not make it so."? There are a couple of things I am not sure about it. When the participle is in ablative ("...
6
votes
0answers
280 views
+50

How things change in Latin

After having provided an answer to Draconis’ question ( Did Latin have any ergative verbs? ), I was wondering about the (very subtle?) meaning differences involved in triads like {aperit/se aperit/...
9
votes
1answer
224 views

What evidence is there for the classical pronunciation of zeta?

As I learned it back in introductory Greek, there's significant debate in the classics community about whether Classical Greek Ζ was pronounced /dz/, /zd/, /zz/, or something else. What evidence is ...
7
votes
1answer
203 views

Tellus' “briny robes”

I read in Keats' Hyperion: [...] No, by Tellus and her briny robes! (Hyperion, 246) Tellus is a Latin goddess, her Greek counterpart being Gaia. I am looking for the Greek or Latin source of the ...
9
votes
1answer
404 views

What is the ancient Greek word for apprenticeship?

I'm looking for an ancient Greek word that denotes a trainee craftsman's regime of study under a master, I found the word μαθητεία but I'm unsure if that is a word in ancient Greek or only in modern ...
5
votes
1answer
345 views

In Matthew 27, why does the Vulgate call the graves of people who were resurrected along with Jesus “monumentum”, but Jesus's grave “sepulchrum”?

In Matthew 27, why does the Vulgate call the graves of people who were resurrected along with Jesus "monumentum", but Jesus's grave "sepulchrum"? Matthew 27:53 says, in Vulgate: ...
14
votes
5answers
9k views

Learn Ancient Greek or Latin first?

I am in the beginning stages of thinking about learning both Ancient Greek and Latin. During my initial research, I have encountered some people saying that learning Latin first is what is commonly ...
15
votes
1answer
380 views

Is there any rule for determining whether a verb beginning with ε- will augment to η- vs ει-, or must all verbs' behaviors be memorized?

For instance, the verb ἐλευθερῶ augments to ἠλευθέρουν in the past, whereas the verb ἔχω augments to εἶχον (not ἦχον as might have been predicted).
5
votes
1answer
120 views

Were iuvenēs expected to squander the family fortune?

Within the familia there are inevitable tensions between members of the various hierarchies that govern it: fathers and sons, men and women, slave and free. As a servant of two masters, adulescens and ...
5
votes
1answer
171 views

Latin justification for the English word tradent

I was reading the following thread https://forum.wordreference.com/threads/tradent.3819293/ - There it is stated that the English word tradent, according to the OED means Chiefly in Rabbinic Jewish ...
6
votes
1answer
669 views

Is there a (cultural, religious etc?) reason, why equus and aequus are nearly homophones?

Equus: (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈe.kʷus/, [ˈɛ.kʷʊs] Aequus: (Classical) IPA(key): /ˈae̯.kʷus/, [ˈae̯.kʷʊs] Is this similarity coincidental or do they have a common origin? Are there any specific ...
7
votes
1answer
431 views

Translate “I will cast my shadow” into Latin

I want to translate I will cast my shadow into Latin. This phrase is inspired from a poem by Horace, that has the line: Pulvis et Umbra Sumus My interpretation of this is that we are simply our ...
10
votes
3answers
321 views

Is translating texts from Latin really necessary to learn the language?

I know that translating texts from Latin is the traditional way to learn the language (and for many people the main goal), but I think that being able to translate a piece of text, however complicated ...
9
votes
3answers
4k views

Could one consider using Latin as a daily casual language these days?

I just saw a video asking like how would one say I just had an avocado toast and thought about some of the new stuff that didn't exist back then. How would we integrate new words into the Latin ...
5
votes
1answer
148 views

Homeric hapax legomenon ἐγγεινομαι — is it not real?

There is a 2018 thesis by Alexandra Kozak, "Le Dictionnaire des hapax dans la poésie grecque archaïque, d'Homère à Eschyle," freely downloadable from https://tel.archives-ouvertes.fr/tel-...
11
votes
1answer
293 views

Received pronunciation in Ancient Greek

As S. Teodorsson argues in his work on the phonemic system of the Attic dialect, there is evidence that already in the IV century BC, 'popular' Athenian speech underwent changes such as the merger of ...
15
votes
2answers
873 views

Is the usage of “id est” in Latin exactly like the usage of “i.e.” or “that is” in English?

There was a question a little while back on the English SE asking about the "plural form of i.e." (unfortunately, it got closed because the author didn't clarify what they meant). While I was trying ...
4
votes
1answer
96 views

How do you say “Forum Friends” in Latin?

In English, if you have people you are friends with from a forum (online or otherwise), you could call them "forum friends". How would you say this in Latin? Can you decline forum as a ...
11
votes
1answer
498 views

In Vulgate Lk 22: 62, “Et egressus foras Petrus flevit amare.”, it says. How to understand “flevit amare”?

I know "flevit" means "wept" and "amare" means "to love", but the Greek text is "ἔκλαυσεν πικρῶς", which means "wept bitterly". If I parse ...
6
votes
2answers
450 views

In Vulgate, Matthaeus 4:23, it says “et prædicans Evangelium regni”. Shouldn't it be “regno” (dative) rather than “regni” (genitive)?

In Vulgate, Matthaeus 4:23, it says "et prædicans Evangelium regni". Shouldn't it be "regno" (dative) rather than "regni" (genitive)? He was talking the gospel TO the ...
5
votes
1answer
127 views

recordor + genitive?

In the Vulgate, Gen 8:1, we have Recordatus autem Deus Noë, cunctorumque animantium, et omnium jumentorum, quæ erant cum eo in arca, adduxit spiritum super terram, et immunitæ sunt aquæ. I would ...
7
votes
2answers
122 views

How would you say “don't let up” in latin?

I'm trying to find a translation for this phrase, with the meaning of "don't let up" to be similar to "don't stop," or "don't give up," or "don't give in." ...
8
votes
1answer
111 views

What are the precise meaning of “in-law” terms?

What is the exact definition of the in-law terms? Note that Latin terms do not necessarily align with English terms. For example, Latin patruus, and avunculus are both English "uncle" (on ...
9
votes
1answer
757 views

Why did Cicero use The Royal “We”?

Thanks to Ben Kovitz who, in Q: "gerund + genitive" vs "gerund+accusative" ("scribendo epistulas" vs "scribendo epistularum"), pointed out Cicero's referring to ...
4
votes
2answers
224 views

Why is intereo not declined like habeo?

Why is intereo not declined like habeo? I thought all verbs ending in -eo were second conjugation. However, the 3rd person singular if habeo is habet, but the 3rd person singular of intereo is interit....
4
votes
2answers
146 views

Dealing with 2 genitives “The farmer's daughter loves the waters of the forest”

Would the right translation be this? Filia agricolae aquas silvae amat Is this correct? I feel that I'm missing something since the order of the words could be anywhere and then you would just assume ...
5
votes
2answers
103 views

The idea of In versus On in Latin

The Latin word "in" is conventionally given in vocabularies as meaning "in or on" but it seems mean more like "associated with" because it mean attached to or bunch of ...
12
votes
5answers
2k views

How to say “I am falling in love with this language”?

What I currently have for this is probably a literal translation: In amor cum haec lingua cado Thank you 🙏
5
votes
4answers
528 views

“gerund + genitive” vs “gerund+accusative” (“scribendo epistulas” vs “scribendo epistularum”)

So far I was thinking the way of saying "He spends time in writing letters" (example from A&G) might be terit tempus scribendo epistulas or terit tempus scribendis epistulis. But can ...
6
votes
1answer
92 views

What role does “municipatum” play in this sentence?

The abbot Berno of Reichenau, in the opening sentence of his Prologus in Tonarium, some time between 1021 and 1036, called himself the following: licet parvus meritis, servus tamen Dei Genitricis ...
3
votes
3answers
378 views

Is “dentibus” ablative in “Lupus collum ovis petit dentibus…”

In Cap. IX of LLPSI Pars I, Ørberg tells the story of a black sheep wandering into the forest where it's confronted by a wolf. The wolf finds the sheep alone in the darkness of the forest, and the ...
8
votes
2answers
1k views

How do you say “good morning” in Latin?

Are there different ways to say good morning in Latin? Would bene mane be okay?
4
votes
0answers
39 views

How do you phrase didactic statements in Latin?

In English, if we want to state rule or some didactic principle, we use the indefinite article. So, for example, we might say "A car drives on the right side of the road." meaning that we ...
15
votes
1answer
762 views

Was avē truly pronounced with an “unspelled /h/”?

According to the etymology at Wiktionary, avē derived from a Punic word with an initial /h/, and was pronounced as such in the Classical period even though the word was spelt without. Is this claim, ...

15 30 50 per page
1
2 3 4 5
88