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31 views

“£30,000? Murders have been committed for a lot less.”

In an old TV-prog. (1950s), "The Annals of Scotland Yard", old cases were dramatised with a narration from distinguished criminologist, the late Edgar Lustgarten. One of these, from the ...
4
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0answers
31 views

“Washington, DC” in latin

Is there a more-or-less commonly accepted translation of "Washington, DC" (i.e., the city, but I would assume the same word would work for the state) in contemporary-latin? I'll happily use ...
5
votes
1answer
515 views

frater < “fere” + “alter”?

Is the etymology of the word frater from fere (almost) + alter (another), in the sense that a brother is more closely related to his sibling than another, unrelated person? St. Isidore's Etymologies (...
0
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1answer
214 views

What Benefit is Conferred by the Inclusion of a Gerundive in an Ablative-Absolute (AA) Construction?

In his answer to Q: Can Gerundives be predicates of Ablative Absolutes?, Seb offered a number of examples, the second of which: "quo senatus consulto recitato cum [populus] more hoc insulso et ...
7
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2answers
346 views

What does the phrase “horae subsecivae” mean in the title of a work by philosopher Christian Wolff?

Christian Wolff was a German philosopher in the 18th century who wrote many works in Latin. As part of his work, he wrote a set of three volumes all called Horae subsecivae Marburgenses (Marburg is a ...
2
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1answer
579 views

Two Sappho-related reference requests

As some of you will definitely know, I have been grappling with Sappho for a long time. Lately, I have come to an impasse in a couple places, where I have said all I can without a specific reference I ...
6
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2answers
642 views

Quidquid veto non licet, certe non oportet

I'm trying to translate this sentence, but I'm not sure how. It looks like either veto is the dative (substantive?) meaning 'old', or it's the verb veto, 'I stop from happening'. With 'non licet', I ...
4
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2answers
87 views

What would be good Latin names for modern book categories?

There are various ways to order/group books in a library. By author, in alphabetical order By size By category etc. Concerning 3) we might have the following names in Latin. They might be opera... ...
6
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1answer
1k views

What is “capult”?

There is a Tertullian quote in one of the editions of Gibbon (see the asterisked note here for the original). Nam proximè ad lenonem damnando Christianam, potius quam ad leonem, confessi estis labem ...
0
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0answers
42 views

On the (necessary or typical?) relationship between double accusative and causation

I was wondering if there is a syntactic/semantic generalization that can account for the so-called "double accusative" predicative frame in Latin (verbs with person & thing (docere ...
3
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0answers
96 views

On the alleged ambiguity of the Ablative Absolute “Mutatis mutandis”

According to the wikipedia entry of Mutatis mutandis, "Mutatis mutandis is a Medieval Latin phrase meaning 'with things changed that should be changed' or 'having changed what needs to be changed'...
9
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4answers
1k views

What is a good font for both Latin with diacritics and polytonic Greek

Previous questions and outline of needs Several questions have been asked, especially for polytonic Greeek – especially ‘What are popular fonts for polytonic Greek?’ and ‘Greek font with legible ...
7
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1answer
266 views

Is ὀργίζω, to anger, cognate with ὄργια, a secret rite or ritual?

Is ὀργίζω, to anger, cognate with ὄργια, a secret rite or ritual? Wiktionary has a red link from the uncommon modern word to a not-yet-existing page for the ancient word (with accents). It seems at ...
5
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3answers
173 views

What was the decision regarding this Paris convent in 1561?

This is the decision of the General Chapter of the Dominicans regarding some trouble in the Paris convent in 1561. Fratres vero Antonium Abeli magistrum et Dominicum Sergent ut indignos denegamus, ...
6
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2answers
533 views

Translating the title of a thesis about energy storage into Latin

How do I translate the title of my dissertation thesis into Latin? Energy storage: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells, Renewable-Hydrogen integration for home usage Here is my best try: Energy praeclusio: ...
9
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2answers
681 views

Word order in Virgil's Aeneid - why so scrambled?

I can understand why Virgil would like to use standard devices like chiasmus and synchysis to create poetic effect in the Aened. But sometimes the word order is scrambled up so much, I can't work out ...
8
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0answers
145 views

Is “oppido” (adverb) related to “oppidum”(noun)?

According to L&S, the etymology of oppido (adverb) is adv. etym. dub. where I imagine "dub" stands for something like "dubious". In any case, what can we speculate about the etymology of this ...
1
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1answer
87 views

How to translated preposition + ing in Latin?

How to translate sentences like "before doing X" in Latin since ante requires an accusative?
4
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2answers
85 views

Is “evidenter” the correct translation for “obviously!”?

I've searched the forum but found no answer to my question. How would one say obviously in Latin? As in answering a question with a "it's option b, obviously!" Online dictionaries have given ...
2
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0answers
60 views

Translating Internet vernacular + 'disorder' into Latin

Newbie to Latin here. I thought it might be amusing to translate web slang into Latin, but this raised a few questions. If the accuracy is lacking, please let me know how! LOLUMADCUZUBAD? Turbati ...
5
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1answer
48 views

Words for dogs, puppies, and small dogs in koine, and their connotations when applied to humans

Modern Greek has σκύλος for "dog," which is derived from ancient σκυλαξ, meaning "puppy." The generic word for a dog in ancient Greek was κυων. There is also a diminutive κυνάριον, ...
6
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1answer
225 views

Ethics of Spinoza - est ut

Spinoza, Ethics, De Deo, Propositio 33, Scholium 2: Quare non est ut in hoc absurdo refutando tempus consumam. William White translates it: Therefore it is not worthwhile that I should waste time ...
5
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1answer
59 views

iuvare ut + subjunctive

In English, I might ask you to "help me [to] do" some task. Would the most (classically) idiomatic Latin equivalent be an ut clause (e.g., "iuva ut faciam ...")? My only reason for ...
12
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1answer
2k views

What declension is the name, Aeneas?

How would you decline this noun? It can not be 1st, 2nd, or 3rd declension. Also, how would you say "of Aeneas", which is genitive case?
10
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1answer
157 views

What is the earliest example of the monophthongisation of 'oe'?

Salvete amicae amicique, I have read lots of sources that state that in the 3rd Century AD. people started pronouncing the diphthong 'oe' as /e:/. However, I can't find any evidence - what I am ...
3
votes
2answers
207 views

Sentence with gerund or gerundive and infinitive

I'm trying to translate the following: [...] quem autem valorem aliter nisi appropinquando cognoscere non datur. Which comes from Euler (De Serie Lambertina/e). But I'm having trouble sorting out ...
2
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1answer
81 views

Suffixes and different stem words in transversarium and transversus?

The difference between transversarium and transversus confuses me, this occurs with processus (masculine) transversus foramen (neutri) transversarium where the endings, sus and sa-ri-um, are ...
7
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1answer
318 views

In what sense is a university (universitas) a whole?

The word for a university in many languages (not Finnish though!) comes from the Latin word universitas. The word appears to mean roughly "the whole", but one might also analyze it along the ...
8
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2answers
267 views

Material for learning new poetic meters

I like metric poetry, and sometimes I want to broaden my horizons by learning a new poetic meter. This has proven quite difficult, because the descriptions in many guides are quite terse. For example, ...
7
votes
2answers
1k views

How can we distinguish “Si vis pacem, para bellum” translations?

On Wikipedia it is said that Si vis pacem, para bellum means "If you want peace, prepare for war". But I think that It also seems like "If you want peace, prepare war". What makes ...
3
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0answers
45 views

Names for digits or numbers

How would you say "I write zeroes and ones" or "I need a fiver" or "the number seven" in Latin? There are a couple of cases where in some languages one uses instead of a ...
7
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4answers
289 views

On Macrons and Vowels

Reading LLPSI, I made a list of the proper nouns with macrons in the first lesson of the first chapter: CAPITVLVM PRĪMVM Rōma Eurōpa Germānia Hispānia Āfrica Nīlus Rhēnus Dānuvius We encounter with ...
9
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2answers
1k views

How to say “fit” in Latin?

The English word "fit" has a number of different uses, and that makes searching difficult. I am looking for a verb or phrase to be used in a sentence like this: The souvenir does not fit in ...
24
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3answers
8k views

What is bullshit in Latin?

If a statement is blatantly wrong or shows lack of interest in the truth, one can call it bullshit in English. But how about Latin? Is there something more strong and colorful than falsus? I am not ...
6
votes
1answer
473 views

“How do you do?”

How to ask "How do you do?" in Latin. Quomodo te habes, is it common? What other common greetings for the "How are you?" exist? I have seen: Quomodo es? Quid agis? Quomodo te habes?
11
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3answers
808 views

How to decline a whale?

The Latin word cētus (a whale or some other major sea creature) behaves peculiarly. In singular it is a normal-looking masculine cētus, but in plural it is a neuter cētē. The ...
5
votes
1answer
82 views

Seize your future

What would "Seize your future/the future" be in Latin? I've got Carpe futurum, but my latin is quite poor. I want to use it as a motto for an educational company. I want to use it as it ...
6
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3answers
4k views

How do I say Disney World in Latin?

How do I say Disney World in Latin? I googled it but I’m still not sure. Disney Mundi? Disney Mundum?
6
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1answer
106 views

Can valeo be used transitively?

Looking through the entry in Lewis & Strong, I couldn't find any mention of the accusative being used with valeo, except as the object of certain prepositions. However, the following use of magna ...
6
votes
1answer
120 views

How do I negate an ut clause of result?

Ut clauses of result are excellent for saying "so ___ that". But what if I wanted to reverse this and say "not ___ enough to"? For example, tam strenue laborābam ut epistolās centum scripserim means "...
1
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1answer
51 views

Natural or unflavoured products

There are a number of different flavours of, say, yogurts, and one of them is plain, without any added flavours besides what is needed to make the yogurt. In English this flavour seems to be often ...
3
votes
3answers
83 views

What are the best translations of “Take it as it goes” and “go forward in the light/ Ever forward in the light”

For take it as it goes I have this so far "Ut áuferant eam abscedit" or " Accipiant illam" althought I don't know how accurate either is is. For go forward in the light I have &...
6
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1answer
693 views

What construction is “διδαχή?”

There is an interesting early Christian document called the Διδαχή, translated into English as "The Teaching." The word seems to be classical, not just Koine. Is this some kind of more ...
3
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0answers
56 views

Did Frontinus mention siphons?

On a rather informative website on aqueducts, I came across the following passage: Frontinus is another classical author who wrote about aqueducts. Around 100 AD he was supervising the aqueducts of ...
10
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2answers
2k views

How is Latium pronounced?

The Merriam Webster definition gives the following pronunciation: \ˈlā-sh(ē-)əm\. But this doesn't sound right to me. I have never heard the consonant 't' pronounced this way in Latin. Which leads me ...
11
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3answers
492 views

Where does Pliny, or any ancient author, write about a stilus plumbeus?

Researching the history of the pencil the German speaking web is full of quotes that attribute to Pliny the mentioning of a stilus plumbeus as the historical and etymological source for the word ...
1
vote
1answer
36 views

Pliny, Naturalis Historia Bk II, first para., “conplexus”

Pliny, Naturalis Historia Book II, paragraph I: Mundum et hoc—quocumque nomine alio caelum appellare libuit cuius circumflexu teguntur cuncta, numen esse credi par est, aeternum, inmensum, neque ...
3
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0answers
86 views

What is the etymology of the Scythian word “hezios” meaning “covered”?

Pliny the Elder claimed, in the 6th book in the 19th chapter of "Naturalis Historia", that the name "Causasus" comes from Scythian "kroi hezios" meaning "snow-...
13
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1answer
199 views

Can a verbum deponens go along with an accusativus?

In Plinius I encountered: "Confitentes iterum ac tertio interrogavi supplicium minatus" Is supplicium some sort of accusativus belonging to minatus, which comes from deponens minor? If a form is ...
5
votes
1answer
191 views

Why did Romans think of novissimus as last?

In the letter of Plinius to Tacitus about his and his mother's flight, there is the following sentence: multi ad deos manus tollere, plures usquam iam deos ullos aeternamque illam et novissimam ...

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