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327 views

Received pronunciation in Ancient Greek

As S. Teodorsson argues in his work on the phonemic system of the Attic dialect, there is evidence that already in the IV century BC, 'popular' Athenian speech underwent changes such as the merger of ...
11
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0answers
114 views

Why is "porticus, porticūs" a feminine fourth-declension noun?

The fourth declension was one of the less common inflection pattern for Latin nouns, and the vast majority of fourth declension nouns are masculine nouns ending in the deverbal abstract noun suffix -...
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94 views

the kiskis and kankan debate: primary sources

There's a very famous story about how in the middle of the sixteenth century the Sorbonne University filed a legal claim to the Parlement de Paris re: the correct pronunciation of qu- in Latin, viz. ...
10
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1answer
339 views

The opposing meanings of the word donec?

I saw that "donec" might mean: "as long as", but it also can mean "till". In a sense those are opposing meanings. let's consider this example: I'm happy as long as there is daylight outside I'm ...
9
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86 views

Which verbs come from *deh₃ and which from *dʰeh₁?

Latin has quite a few prefixed verbs looking like -dō, -dere, -didī, -ditus (condō, abdō, reddō, trādō, ēdō, etc). I'd previously thought these came from the verb dō, dare, dedī, datus (< *deh₃ &...
9
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0answers
85 views

Coordinating positive and negative imperatives

For positive commands, Latin uses the imperative: Da mihi librum "Give me the book." For negative commands, it uses a number of constructions of which noli + inf. is most common: Noli mihi ...
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98 views

Construction with ecce

According to the usual authorities the particle ecce is construed with the accusative in pre-classical Latin, but with the nominative in classical and post-classical Latin. Thus, Lewis and Short: “(...
9
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204 views

edere panem vs. comedere panem

Consider the following minimal pair: edere panem 'to eat (the) bread' comedere panem 'to eat up the bread' When a resultative prefix is present (e.g. com- in comedere), panem is necessarily understood ...
8
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226 views

Why is the infinitive used instead of a genitive gerund (e.g. "consilium ceperunt ex oppido profugere")?

I was wondering about the grammatical reason(s) whereby a(n expected) genitive gerund/gerundive is sometimes replaced by an infinitive. Here are some representative examples of this phenomenon: ...
8
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46 views

How can I use Perseus for Boolean searches?

Encouraged by Joonas Ilmavirta in chat, as ‘Corpus tool questions are a useful thing to have for reference’, I boldly go forth asking this publicly: Does anyone know how to do a Boolean search on ...
8
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0answers
128 views

Just how out of date are the major 19th/early 20th century Latin grammars (G&L, A&G, Bennett)

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, there were a slew of Latin grammars published in English that stuck around are still popular today (in the Anglophone world). A survey of various resources ...
8
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179 views

Is "oppido" (adverb) related to "oppidum"(noun)?

According to L&S, the etymology of oppido (adverb) is adv. etym. dub. where I imagine "dub" stands for something like "dubious". In any case, what can we speculate about the etymology of this ...
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71 views

What is the most helpful dictionary for post-medieval works of philosophy and mathematics?

I need Latin for my natural-language artificial intelligence research, and I've been at it for enough years that I can read Latin well, but need extensive practice with composition. Thus I have ...
7
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61 views

Roman wedding congratulations

How did the Romans congratulate a couple on their wedding day? The concepts of wedding and marriage were not quite what they are now back then, but I assume that celebrations and congratulations were ...
7
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80 views

Accusativus cum Praedicativo

I've been reading The Early Latin Verb by Wolfgang David Cirilo de Melo, where in a footnote he writes: Synchronically, the participle here is best analysed as an elliptical perfect passive ...
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603 views

Is "Every new beginning comes from some other beginning's end" correctly attributed to Seneca (the younger)?

The quote is a fairly well know lyric in the 1998 song Closing Time by Semisonic. In the Wikipedia entry for the song, it claims "The song ends with a quote attributed to Roman Stoic philosopher ...
7
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0answers
68 views

Was deliberately bad grammar ever used for emphasis in Latin?

In English, we can sometimes use deliberately incorrect grammar for effect in speech. The first example that comes to mind is a more colloquial example: I ain't never going to do... When I hear this ...
7
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172 views

On the syntax of some datives in a beautiful Ciceronian structure

I was wondering if you would like to share your thoughts on the grammar of the datives in the following texts from Cicero. The second example is a very interesting one provided by Kingshorsey in an ...
7
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81 views

Is there a pre-Christian Roman story of "coming to faith"?

Is there a story in the Roman literature of someone previously not believing in the traditional Roman gods or a specific deity within their pantheon but later, after a vision or another experience, ...
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200 views

Greek: unattainable wishes about the present

This is a question about how a specific type of unattainable (counterfactual) wish about the present is expressed in Greek. I'm looking for a good way of translating sentences like the following into ...
7
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0answers
114 views

When did acronyms first appear?

Acronyms are abbreviations that are read as whole words rather than letter by letter — or in other words, they are words formed from initials of a phrase. "NATO" and "laser" are two examples. I ...
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0answers
225 views

"Purissimum penem" in Suetonius's Life of Horace

Suetonius, in his Vita Horati, reports that the emperor Augustus jokingly referred to Horace as a purissimus penis: Praeterea saepe eum inter alios iocos purissimum penem et homuncionem ...
7
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115 views

In Confessions I.18, does Augustine clearly indicate the physical death of an enemy?

In Augustine's Confessions, I.18, he writes: et certe non est interior litterarum scientia quam scripta conscientia, id se alteri facere quod nolit pati. quam tu secretus es, habitans in excelsis ...
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44 views

Translation of specific sentence in Latin

I would like to know how could I say something like "Make yourself at home, but remember you aren't" in Latin. It is a quirky thing a Brazilian friend says a lot (I've translated it to ...
6
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0answers
59 views

Dominus vobiscum / omitted copula in subjunctive mood?

In Catholic liturgy, there is this ubiquitous expression used to join or precede important prayers where the priest salutes the assembly by wishing (or so I think) that the Lord be with them: Dominus ...
6
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1answer
131 views

"Look at the bright side" in Latin

When something "bad" happens to someone, a comforting message from another person my be "Look at the bright side: (at least) ...", then describing something positive that this &...
6
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0answers
61 views

Syllabification of "anhelo"

I'm setting some writing of St. Augustine to music, and it includes the word anhelo ("I long for"). I'm wondering whether an-he-lo or a-nhe-lo is the preferred way to divide it into ...
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29 views

How did people describe flags and banners using Latin?

This is my first time on the forum, so If there's any tips to get my question answered feel free to share. I have been working on a Minecraft resource pack that changes the Latin setting, hopefully ...
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92 views

Accusative case marking of subjects in infinitival clauses

The present question is based on a previous discussion with Draconis and on a previous question raised by Joonas. The Accusativus cum Infinitivo (AcI) construction is often regarded in linguistics as ...
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0answers
65 views

How was the Concept of Price-Wage Inflation Expressed in the Roman World?

Inflation bedevils capitalist economies. Despite the power of Rome, the low-wage slave-economy, and a single currency (quite an achievement), the Roman World suffered from inflation. This happened ...
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83 views

Semantic link between πόνος and πονηρός?

Πόνος means toil or suffering, while πονηρός, derived from it, can mean either that someone toils under oppression or else is knavish, base, or evil. What is the semantic link between toil/suffering ...
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63 views

Does the indefinite pronoun/determiner "quă" only exist as an enclitic?

I recently learned that there is an indefinite determiner and pronoun quă used in the feminine nominative singular and neuter nominative/accusative plural with the sense "any(one)" (...
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0answers
73 views

What was the use and frequency of use of Latin "mactāre"?

In What are the key differences between the main Latin verbs meaning "to kill"? we saw a lot of verbs meaning "to kill" and the differences between them. The fun part of it is that ...
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265 views

How old is Ecclesiastical Latin Pronunciation?

Salvete, I have trying to research how old the Ecclesiastical Pronunciation of Latin is. To be more precise, I mean the Italianate pronunciation, called 'La Pronuncia Scolastica' in Italian. Many ...
6
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126 views

How does Homer say "finger" and "leg?"

The English-Greek dictionary by Woodhouse translates finger as "δάκτυλος." However, the Homeric dictionary by Cunliffe doesn't have this word, and searching in the text of Homer doesn't seem to turn ...
6
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0answers
100 views

What is the etymology of Ἁμαδρυάς (Hamadryas)? Is the second alpha actually long?

I am trying to find more information about the formation and pronunciation of the Greek noun Ἁμαδρυάς, taken into Latin as Hamadryas. L&S transcribes the second a of the Latin form with a macron: ...
6
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0answers
149 views

What do we know about Homer's pronunciation?

Nowadays, most classicists seem to teach a reconstructed Ancient Greek pronunciation, imitating how an Athenian would have spoken in the fifth century BCE. On top of that, there's solid evidence for ...
6
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0answers
294 views

How things change in Latin

After having provided an answer to Draconis’ question ( Did Latin have any ergative verbs? ), I was wondering about the (very subtle?) meaning differences involved in triads like {aperit/se aperit/...
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0answers
77 views

Latin name of "Roman Dodecahedron"?

There are some 200 archaeological finds known under the name "Roman dodecahedron". There is no accepted or convincing explanation about their purpose and they have not been identified in any text. ...
6
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0answers
67 views

παντοκράτωρ - a matter of power or authority?

παντοκράτωρ, pantokrator is generally translated as "almighty," interpreted as a matter of power. I.e. the bible talks about one infinite God, El shaddai. But im curious if we may have been ...
6
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0answers
83 views

What does Geryon have to do with singing?

One of the Labors of Heracles involved a three-headed giant named Geryon (Γηρυών). I've never seen an explanation for this name, but at first glance it would seem to be connected to γηρύω "to sing" (...
6
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0answers
213 views

How did σσ differ from σ?

Varro mentioned in this answer: I think it's highly likely that originally Greek σσ had a distinct sound from σ which made it a closer match to a foreign [ʃ] than σ would have been, which is why it ...
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0answers
118 views

Did Alexander the Great change the meaning of "Hellenes"?

The Hellenistic era was launched by Alexander the Great, and his death is usually defined as the starting point. The Greek word Hellenes (Ἕλληνες) was in use before, during, and after the Hellenistic ...
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97 views

About Sappho Edmonds 69 Lobel-Page 54 Campbell 54: why the emendation of the participle?

The manuscript tradition for the fragment in the title gives us: ἔλθοντ' ἐξ ὀράνω πορφυρίαν ἔχοντα προϊέμενον χλάμυν For reasons of meter, deleting the ἔχοντα is basically mandatory. However, why ...
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102 views

What was the classic term for "damnatio memoriae"?

The Wikipedia article on the subject notes that the term damnatio memoriae, referring to the relegation of a person's name to oblivion, as if they never existed, is a neo-Latin expression first ...
6
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0answers
598 views

How did "glutaeus/gluteus" come from Greek "gloutos"? Would "glutiaeus" be more correct?

In anatomy, the muscles of the buttocks are referred to collectively as the "glut(a)eal muscles" in English, and are individually given the following Latin names: glut(a)eus maximus, glut(a)eus medius ...
6
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0answers
618 views

What is the word for "reason" and what resonance does it have in Roman culture?

I find it interesting that the French expression avoir raison shares an etymology with the English words "reason" and "rational". In a post-truth political era, it is refreshing that the French ...
6
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0answers
226 views

Reviewing the evidence of the spirantization of β (betacism) in Greek

I originally submitted this question to the Linguistics beta site, and those users recommended that I ask anything related to Greek here. Although I understand that it is impossible to assign a ...
6
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0answers
145 views

About l. 13 of Sappho 31 Campbell / 2 Edmonds

I was updating the critical note to my blog post on this poem and inspecting Bergk's huge critical note when I saw that, concerning this line, he proposes «ἀ δέ μ' ἴδρως κακχέεται», maybe even «ἀ δὲ ...
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62 views

What is this extra source for Sappho 31 Campbell / 2 Edmonds?

I just noticed that Campbell, listing sources for Sappho 31 Campbell / 2 Edmonds, besides Longinus, mentions also P.S.I. (v. fr. 213B). I looked on PSI online, but nothing with the number 213 in its ...

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