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Questions tagged [word-comparison]

For questions about comparing two or more words, not for comparative forms of adjectives.

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4 votes
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Τέλος vs. πέρας

Meanings of πέρας listed in wiktionary: end, goal, extremity All these fall within the scope of τέλος. I would like to understand the nuances of these three meanings (there is no problem with ...
Pavel V.'s user avatar
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8 votes
1 answer
165 views

When/whether to use "ineō" instead of "eō"

I am learning Latin for the first time this year, and I have a question about the usage of the verb 'eō', I go. The textbook that I am using, Henle Latin 1st Year, lists 'eō' as follows: eō, īre, ...
Jacob Lockard's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
240 views

Is there any difference between "minime" and "minume"?

Prompted by cnread's answer to another question, I wanted to ask: is there any difference between mĭnĭmē and mĭnŭmē? The linked L&S entries do not offer any obvious commentary. A quick corpus ...
brianpck's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
783 views

Difference between αὐτός and οὗτος

In the sentence οὗτος λέγει ὅτι αὕτη τὸ βιβλίον γράφει translated by "He says that she is writing the book." would the meaning change if οὗτος was substituted by αὐτός thus forming the sentence αὐτός ...
Alexandre Daubricourt's user avatar
9 votes
2 answers
4k views

What is the difference between "lux" and "lumen"?

Latin has two common words for "light": lux and lumen. What are the differences between these two words? Are there any contexts in which one would be appropriate while the other would not? It would ...
brianpck's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
616 views

About the difference between the enclitic "ne" and the non-enclitic "ne"

So, I know that -ne is an enclitic to express a yes/no question. But, the "Ne", as a non-enclitic, as I understood it, could also be a word question. In "Ne....annon" or "Ne....necne" Meaning Is it....
Quidam's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
233 views

Difference between Sententia and Opinio?

Could you give some examples of sentences showing the difference between Opinio and Sentencia? Aren't both good translations for "opinions?" "Through" and "opinion" seems to be translated by both: ...
Quidam's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
454 views

Meanings of cibus, and cibi

The dictionary I use tells me that Cibus, could mean "food", or "meals" or "dishes", and many other related meanings. So, I find logical, that, when you have the plural, it means rather meals/dishes. ...
Quidam's user avatar
  • 1,796
4 votes
1 answer
69 views

How do you translate "My potions are too strong for you?"

It is really just the "are too strong for you" I am having trouble with. We haven't gone over how to say stuff like that in class yet. Would you use the superlative?
dionot's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
80 views

Are the two types of lustra distinguishable?

One meaning of the word lustrum is a sacrifice for purification done every five years; another is a house of ill repute. I'd always figured that the two were complete homophones. However, someone ...
Draconis's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
277 views

Difference between "senex "and "senilis"?

What would be the differences in uses of "senilis" and "senex". I know "senilis" is constructed with senex+illis, it should help me, but I don't get it. Thank you.
Quidam's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
148 views

How was 'fissiparus' mistakenly analogized with 'vīviparus'?

Is the Wiktionary entry on fissiparous below correct? Why's the analogy "mistaken"? The compounding makes sense to me? Etymology An adaptation of the New Latin fissiparus, from fissus (“...
user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
2k views

Why is the phrase "horror vacui" commonly interpreted as "nature abhors a vacuum"?

Why is the Latin phrase: horror vacui commonly interpreted as: nature abhors a vacuum? It may well be Aristotle's intended message, given the context, but it seems like a bit of a jump. Doesn't it? ...
voices's user avatar
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15 votes
6 answers
10k views

Is Cola "probably the best-known" Latin word in the world? If not, which might it be?

I found this in an ecological park: Cola is actually a Latin word (a scientific one, referring to the plant), albeit its etymology is African. I am curious about whether it is "probably" the best-...
luchonacho's user avatar
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7 votes
2 answers
3k views

Uter vs. Uterque

The way I learned 'uter' and 'uterque' was as follows. 'Uter' is like the Greek 'πότερος', meaning (in interrogative uses) 'which, of two?' and (in non-interrogative uses) 'either, of two'. I learned ...
Michael's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
220 views

<quality> even for being a <noun>

Salvēte omnēs, hocc erit mihi prīmum rogātum hāc in sēde. Haud dūdum vīdī quendam hominem scīscitārī, quōmodo posset Latīnē dīcī "he has a long tail, even for a cat". Ad quod rogātum cum respondēre ...
Unbrutal_Russian's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
206 views

ἤ = vel or ἤ = aut?

LSJ says ἤ is a "disjunctive or", but does it correspond Latin's vel ("inclusive disjunction") or aut ("exclusive disjunction")?
Geremia's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
154 views

παντοκράτωρ - a matter of power or authority?

παντοκράτωρ, pantokrator is generally translated as "almighty," interpreted as a matter of power. I.e. the bible talks about one infinite God, El shaddai. But im curious if we may have been ...
Rey Kabrom's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
1k views

Comparing 'ita' and 'sic'

Both ita and sic mean roughly "so" or "in such way". I know they are not identical and I have a relatively good feeling of their respective meanings, but I couldn't quite put my finger on the ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
181 views

Was there any difference between "grātĭa" and "făvor"?

The Lewis & Short dictionary defines gratia as: grātĭa, ae, f. gratus; lit., favor, both that in which one stands with others and that which one shows to others. I. Favor which one finds ...
Charlie's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
500 views

How to choose correct word variants?

I asked a question earlier. For some time now, it's occured to me that a pattern is forming: All my questions about the Latin language are basically the same. The subjects change, but the underlying ...
voices's user avatar
  • 441
3 votes
1 answer
121 views

What is the difference between "return" and "yield"?

In the Python programming language, "yield" and "return" are keywords with specific meanings. A function can either yield a result (sending that result back and then continuing to work), or return it ...
Draconis's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
586 views

Is there a difference between 'pluvia' and 'imber'?

It occurred to me yesterday that I know two Latin words for rain: pluvia and imber. However, I don't seem to know how these two words compare to each other, and the L&S entries offer little help. ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
11 votes
2 answers
1k views

What is the difference between "novi" and "scio"?

Latin has at least two words that straightforwardly translate to English "know": novi (perf. of nosco) scio Plautus combines the two pleonastically: nec vos qui homines sitis novi nec scio Here'...
brianpck's user avatar
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4 votes
0 answers
260 views

What is the difference between nego, ignoro, and nescio?

Trying to understand the subtle differences between the three words "nego", "ignoro", and "nescio". This question is not about the meanings in modern English, but the original meanings of the ...
Ambroise Rabier's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
176 views

What is the difference between ingenitus and innatus?

When discussing things "running in the blood", I suggested the word ingenitus for "innate", while Tom Cotton preferred innatus. Is there a difference in meaning between these two words? The second ...
Draconis's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
2k views

How do extra and ultra compare?

The adverbs (and prepositions) extra and ultra are somewhat similar but not identical. While I can read the two dictionary entries and get an idea what they mean, I don't feel that I fully grasp how ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
14 votes
2 answers
1k views

Does mentula ("penis") derive from the same root as mens ("mind"), and if so why?

The Latin word mentula isn't properly defined in the Lewis & Short dictionary, but it does show up on Latin-Dictionary.net and Wiktionary. Both those dictionaries define mentula as "penis". But ...
ktm5124's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
629 views

What was the most common and generic word used in classic Latin that meant "to speak" or "to talk"?

Nowadays in Spanish the verb used for "to speak" or "to talk" is hablar, which comes directly from Latin fābŭlor, meaning: 1 to talk familiarly, to chat, to converse 2 to invent a story, to make ...
Charlie's user avatar
  • 2,219
14 votes
5 answers
3k views

Saints: sanctus or divus?

I was in Bologna last week, and a couple of churches had an inscription about their dedication to a saint. To my surprise, they used the word divus instead of sanctus. For example, a church may be ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
740 views

What is the difference between "enim" and "quia"?

Consider the following two phrases: noli timere: exaudivit enim Deus vocem pueri de loco in quo est (Genesis 21:17b) et benedicentur in semine tuo omnes gentes terrae, quia obedisti voci meae (...
luchonacho's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
283 views

-ne as an Indication of Fear in a Question

I was recently taking a sort of multiple choice quiz on just general Latin knowledge, and I came upon one question that threw me for a loop, so to speak. The question asked which of the options best ...
Sam K's user avatar
  • 3,998
20 votes
6 answers
3k views

Was "oscŭlum" a cultured word in Latin?

The Spanish language has two words for kiss: Beso, from Latin basium. Ósculo, from Latin oscŭlum. The second one is very seldom used, and only in literature as it is a cultured word. Nonetheless, it ...
Charlie's user avatar
  • 2,219
4 votes
1 answer
477 views

Pairs like quot/tot and quantum/tantum

There seem to be a lot of pairs of words in Latin where a "question" starts with qu- and the corresponding "answer" by t-. For example: quot/tot, quantum/tantum, qualis/talis, quotiens/totiens. The ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
135 views

Comparing the etymologies of the adjective and participle 'latus'

What are the etymologies of the adjective latus ("wide") and the participle latus ("carried")? I had assumed that they are the same and the participle just started a new life as an adjective after a ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
50 views

How does ancient and modern arbitration differ?

There is a legal thing called arbitration in modern world, and the Romans seem to have had the word arbitratio. I wonder whether the modern arbitration and the Roman arbitratio (and the related words ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
10 votes
1 answer
4k views

Prae- & Ante- (before)

The prefixes prae- and ante- both have the same meaning of 'before' in place or time. Why is the existence of both words necessary?
andersj's user avatar
  • 101
9 votes
2 answers
8k views

Anima vs. Animus

I keep mixing up animus and anima, and it seems their meanings overlap somewhat. For example, Wiktionary gives the following: animus: mind, soul, life force; courage, will anima: soul, spirit, life; ...
Expedito Bipes's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
184 views

Politically (in)correct Latin

I am looking for an example of a pair of adjectives or nouns (broadly defined) in classical Latin which mean the same thing but one is considered rude and the other one polite. I could list several ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
601 views

How to translate machine learning?

Machine learning is a roughly method where a machine learns to perform a certain task by learning on its own. The machine gains experience and can solve a very specific problem intuitively. It is not ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
118 views

A polite word for female facilities

What would be a good Latin word for "women", "ladies", "female(s)", or the like when I want to indicate the gender designation of a sauna or a toilet? In English I would choose "ladies", or perhaps in ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
339 views

Different registers of urination

In English and Finnish (and probably most languages) there are different verbs for urination to be used under different circumstances: clinical: urinate, mictuate; virtsata childish: pee, wee; ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
12 votes
1 answer
6k views

What is the difference between Spiritus and Anima?

Both spiritus and anima seem to have the definition of soul, but it is mentioned on numerous sites that they are different from one another. What is the difference?
slsl3079's user avatar
  • 345
5 votes
1 answer
2k views

Different levels of friends

Are there Latin words for friends of different depth? A more shallow friend might perhaps be called "mate" or "pal", and a deeper one "friend". Perhaps a shallow friend could also be called "...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
180 views

A rough comparison of different derivatives of plere

There seems to be a large number of verbs derived from plere, all meaning "to fill" to some extent: plere, supplere, complere, implere, explere, opplere. I understand that replere means "to refill" ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
53 views

What are the nuances between ἀποδίδωμι and δίδωμι, especially in this context?

In the following text, how does ἀποδίδωμι add a nuance that would be lost with the simpler δίδωμι? Why do you think Plato chose the former over the latter? If we do a quick search on ἀποδίδωμι in the ...
ktm5124's user avatar
  • 12.1k
14 votes
2 answers
3k views

Pulvis aut Favillae in 'Dust and Ashes' in the Book of Job?

The famous phrase "Dust to Dust, Ashes to Ashes" does not come from the Bible but from the English Burial Service of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, reading: "we therefore commit his body to the ...
Johan88's user avatar
  • 1,095
1 vote
0 answers
165 views

What is the relation between -men and -mentum?

When answering this question about incrementum, I recalled the similarity of the suffixes -mentum and -men. If the linked Wiktionary pages are to be trusted, they are etymologically related, both ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
634 views

What is the difference between ira and furor?

The words ira and furor are quite similar, but apparently not synonymous. I found myself unable to give a clear comparison of the two words. How would you describe the difference between the meanings ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
4k views

Are "vir" and "virgo" etymologically related?

Are vir and virgo etymologically related? St. Isidore says, in his Etymologies p. 242, that virago and vir are related: A ‘heroic maiden’ (virago) is so called because she ‘acts like a man’ (...
Geremia's user avatar
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