Questions tagged [word-comparison]

For questions about comparing two or more words, not for comparative forms of adjectives.

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παντοκράτωρ - a matter of power or authority?

παντοκράτωρ, pantokrator is generally translated as "almighty," interpreted as a matter of power. I.e. the bible talks about one infinite God, El shaddai. But im curious if we may have been ...
5
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0answers
80 views

ἤ = vel or ἤ = aut?

LSJ says ἤ is a "disjunctive or", but does it correspond Latin's vel ("inclusive disjunction") or aut ("exclusive cunjunction")?
5
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223 views

Etymology of “ingeniōsus” and “ingenuus”

Can someone please explain how these two words, ingenuus ingeniōsus both deriving from gignō, come to mean what they respectively do? BACKGROUND According to Wiktionary, ingenuus is made of in- +‎ ...
5
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226 views

Comparing per- and de- as intensifying prefixes

Both per- an de- can be used as intensifying prefixes. It seems that per- is far more common, but also de- occurs (detritus, defetisci, deplorare…). There is also deperire, where de- seems to ...
4
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0answers
161 views

What is the difference between nego, ignoro, and nescio?

Trying to understand the subtle differences between the three words "nego", "ignoro", and "nescio". This question is not about the meanings in modern English, but the original meanings of the ...
4
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0answers
50 views

Comparing citizens and subjects

There is a difference between a citizen and a subject. Roughly, a citizen holds some power in the state (through voting or otherwise), whereas a subject is subordinate to their leader and has no say. (...
4
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0answers
92 views

Which one is better: “sunt aequivalentes” or “aequivalent”?

If I want to say that two things are equivalent in Latin, I can imagine two ways using essentially the same word: X et Y sunt aequivalentes. X et Y aequivalent. Googling for the first option (...
3
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0answers
108 views

What are the differences between “demens” and “insanus”? Are there any single Latin words (nouns) for “insane person”?

First, I'm struggling with understanding the difference between demens and insanum. My understanding is that demens is an adjective (insane). I've also seen insanum in a few online dictionaries (here'...
3
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0answers
35 views

What are the meanings of servus and minister in ecclesiatical latin?

Reading the answers to another question I thought about the meaning of servus and minister in christian/ecclesiastical latin. It seems to me that in classical latin servus related clearly to the legal ...
3
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0answers
46 views

What are the nuances between ἀποδίδωμι and δίδωμι, especially in this context?

In the following text, how does ἀποδίδωμι add a nuance that would be lost with the simpler δίδωμι? Why do you think Plato chose the former over the latter? If we do a quick search on ἀποδίδωμι in the ...
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115 views

What is the relation between -men and -mentum?

When answering this question about incrementum, I recalled the similarity of the suffixes -mentum and -men. If the linked Wiktionary pages are to be trusted, they are etymologically related, both ...