Questions tagged [word-comparison]

For questions about comparing two or more words, not for comparative forms of adjectives.

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4
votes
2answers
112 views

Difference between Sententia and Opinio?

Could you give some examples of sentences showing the difference between Opinio and Sentencia? Aren't both good translations for "opinions?" "Through" and "opinion" seems to be translated by both: ...
7
votes
3answers
1k views

What is the difference between niger and ater?

L&S gives descriptions of niger and ater, but the difference is is not clear to me at all. Both mean black, but there appears to be a difference in nuance — as practically always when two ...
6
votes
1answer
499 views

When to use ae vs a for plurals?

I'm reading Familia Romana book and encountered these 2 sentences. Corsica et Sardinia insulae magnae sunt. And Brundisium et Sparta oppida magna sunt. Why does the ae changes to a and vice versa?
4
votes
1answer
79 views

What is the relation and history of 'si' and 'sic'?

Lewis and Short tell me that sic comes from si by adding the particle -ce. I can understand sice wearing down to sic, but I do not quite understand how I am supposed to understand the meanings of the ...
5
votes
0answers
223 views

Etymology of “ingeniōsus” and “ingenuus”

Can someone please explain how these two words, ingenuus ingeniōsus both deriving from gignō, come to mean what they respectively do? BACKGROUND According to Wiktionary, ingenuus is made of in- +‎ ...
7
votes
1answer
1k views

Distinguishing house from home

The common word domus can mean both "house" and "home". How can I make a distinction between a house and a home in Latin? For example, I might buy a house but it doesn't feel like ...
12
votes
1answer
671 views

Comparing ius sacrum and fas

I would like clarification on two related divine and legal terms: ius sacrum and fas. They can both be translated as "divine law", but I do not think they are the same thing. I have an idea of what ...
6
votes
1answer
199 views

Two levels of 'and'

What I am looking for is best illustrate by an example, so please excuse the detour. In Finnish there are two words for "and": "ja" and "sekä". When used together, "...
10
votes
1answer
179 views

Lonely vs. alone

A person is alone when there are no other people around. A person is lonely when the presence of other people is missed. Neither implies the other; you can be lonely but not alone or alone but not ...
3
votes
2answers
375 views

What is the difference between “enim” and “quia”?

Consider the following two phrases: noli timere: exaudivit enim Deus vocem pueri de loco in quo est (Genesis 21:17b) et benedicentur in semine tuo omnes gentes terrae, quia obedisti voci meae (...
5
votes
2answers
197 views

Comparing words for resistance

The English word "resistance" is obviously etymologically related to resistentia, and I would like to understand how good of a translation resistentia. To be clear, I mean resistance in the sense of a ...
6
votes
1answer
199 views

<quality> even for being a <noun>

Salvēte omnēs, hocc erit mihi prīmum rogātum hāc in sēde. Haud dūdum vīdī quendam hominem scīscitārī, quōmodo posset Latīnē dīcī "he has a long tail, even for a cat". Ad quod rogātum cum respondēre ...
4
votes
2answers
188 views

What is the difference between etiam and enim?

In Latin etiam and enim seem to have pretty similar meanings. I notice that both Greek and Latin seem to use connective words like this a lot, I suppose because they had no punctuation, so they serve ...
3
votes
0answers
108 views

What are the differences between “demens” and “insanus”? Are there any single Latin words (nouns) for “insane person”?

First, I'm struggling with understanding the difference between demens and insanum. My understanding is that demens is an adjective (insane). I've also seen insanum in a few online dictionaries (here'...
6
votes
1answer
653 views

Can we finally know the difference between these words?

There seem to be four different Latin words, all of which are common, and all of which seem to mean exactly the same thing, "finally": tandem denique demum postremo Is there any difference ...
6
votes
1answer
176 views

Euler passage translation (Latin in 18th century)

I would like to include a translation of a brief passage from Euler's music text Tentamen novae theoriae musicae (1739) in an article I am writing, but find the original somewhat tricky to work with. ...
2
votes
1answer
137 views

Res vs Obiectus

What is the difference in meaning between Res and Obiectus (is it merely a matter of Language evolution Classical vs Medieval)? As a meaning I am interested in that which (the thing that) is related ...
1
vote
1answer
208 views

About the difference between the enclitic “ne” and the non-enclitic “ne”

So, I know that -ne is an enclitic to express a yes/no question. But, the "Ne", as a non-enclitic, as I understood it, could also be a word question. In "Ne....annon" or "Ne....necne" Meaning Is it....
7
votes
1answer
230 views

Difference between 'urbe' and 'oppidum'?

I have found that LLPSI uses oppidum to describe cities (at least in the early chapters) while Duolingo uses urbe. What is the difference, and which should I usually use?
3
votes
0answers
35 views

What are the meanings of servus and minister in ecclesiatical latin?

Reading the answers to another question I thought about the meaning of servus and minister in christian/ecclesiastical latin. It seems to me that in classical latin servus related clearly to the legal ...
1
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0answers
36 views

Romans and Ancient Greek language [duplicate]

Is there evidence in the inscriptions, that Romans have realised, that Hellenic languages are very close to theirs own language!? It seems to be that the distinguish was applied to the Etruscan ...
8
votes
2answers
895 views

What is the difference between “lux” and “lumen”?

Latin has two common words for "light": lux and lumen. What are the differences between these two words? Are there any contexts in which one would be appropriate while the other would not? It would ...
4
votes
1answer
79 views

Τέλος vs. πέρας

Meanings of πέρας listed in wiktionary: end, goal, extremity All these fall within the scope of τέλος. I would like to understand the nuances of these three meanings (there is no problem with ...
8
votes
1answer
126 views

When/whether to use “ineō” instead of “eō”

I am learning Latin for the first time this year, and I have a question about the usage of the verb 'eō', I go. The textbook that I am using, Henle Latin 1st Year, lists 'eō' as follows: eō, īre, ...
14
votes
2answers
2k views

Pulvis aut Favillae in 'Dust and Ashes' in the Book of Job?

The famous phrase "Dust to Dust, Ashes to Ashes" does not come from the Bible but from the English Burial Service of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, reading: "we therefore commit his body to the ...
9
votes
1answer
2k views

Prae- & Ante- (before)

The prefixes prae- and ante- both have the same meaning of 'before' in place or time. Why is the existence of both words necessary?
6
votes
2answers
3k views

What is the difference between suus and eius?

What is the difference between the possessive adjective suus (his, hers, its, theirs) (and its declensions) and the genitive, possessive pronoun eius (of her, of him, of it)? Can these words be ...
2
votes
1answer
149 views

Is there any difference between “minime” and “minume”?

Prompted by cnread's answer to another question, I wanted to ask: is there any difference between mĭnĭmē and mĭnŭmē? The linked L&S entries do not offer any obvious commentary. A quick corpus ...
12
votes
2answers
728 views

Does mentula (“penis”) derive from the same root as mens (“mind”), and if so why?

The Latin word mentula isn't properly defined in the Lewis & Short dictionary, but it does show up on Latin-Dictionary.net and Wiktionary. Both those dictionaries define mentula as "penis". But ...
7
votes
1answer
427 views

Difference between αὐτός and οὗτος

In the sentence οὗτος λέγει ὅτι αὕτη τὸ βιβλίον γράφει translated by "He says that she is writing the book." would the meaning change if οὗτος was substituted by αὐτός thus forming the sentence αὐτός ...
11
votes
1answer
15k views

Most accurate Latin word for “book” in this context

The English word "book" has many potential Latin translations, such as liber, monumentum, carta, codex, and volumen. If, in this context, the book refers to a textbook or collection of stories, what ...
3
votes
1answer
138 views

Meanings of cibus, and cibi

The dictionary I use tells me that Cibus, could mean "food", or "meals" or "dishes", and many other related meanings. So, I find logical, that, when you have the plural, it means rather meals/dishes. ...
4
votes
1answer
51 views

How do you translate “My potions are too strong for you?”

It is really just the "are too strong for you" I am having trouble with. We haven't gone over how to say stuff like that in class yet. Would you use the superlative?
3
votes
1answer
69 views

Are the two types of lustra distinguishable?

One meaning of the word lustrum is a sacrifice for purification done every five years; another is a house of ill repute. I'd always figured that the two were complete homophones. However, someone ...
5
votes
1answer
106 views

Difference between “senex ”and “senilis”?

What would be the differences in uses of "senilis" and "senex". I know "senilis" is constructed with senex+illis, it should help me, but I don't get it. Thank you.
7
votes
1answer
195 views

Relation of cuncti and cunctare?

I know the word cuncti/ae/a means "all", but then I came across the word cunctare or cunctari, alternatively, which means "to hesitate". Do these two words share a common etymology to some extent?
3
votes
2answers
320 views

How to choose correct word variants?

I asked a question earlier. For some time now, it's occured to me that a pattern is forming: All my questions about the Latin language are basically the same. The subjects change, but the underlying ...
2
votes
1answer
90 views

How was 'fissiparus' mistakenly analogized with 'vīviparus'?

Is the Wiktionary entry on fissiparous below correct? Why's the analogy "mistaken"? The compounding makes sense to me? Etymology An adaptation of the New Latin fissiparus, from fissus (“...
17
votes
6answers
9k views

Is Cola “probably the best-known” Latin word in the world? If not, which might it be?

I found this in an ecological park: Cola is actually a Latin word (a scientific one, referring to the plant), albeit its etymology is African. I am curious about whether it is "probably" the best-...
2
votes
1answer
864 views

Why is the phrase “horror vacui” commonly interpreted as “nature abhors a vacuum”?

Why is the Latin phrase: horror vacui commonly interpreted as: nature abhors a vacuum? It may well be Aristotle's intended message, given the context, but it seems like a bit of a jump. Doesn't it? ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

Uter vs. Uterque

The way I learned 'uter' and 'uterque' was as follows. 'Uter' is like the Greek 'πότερος', meaning (in interrogative uses) 'which, of two?' and (in non-interrogative uses) 'either, of two'. I learned ...
5
votes
0answers
80 views

ἤ = vel or ἤ = aut?

LSJ says ἤ is a "disjunctive or", but does it correspond Latin's vel ("inclusive disjunction") or aut ("exclusive cunjunction")?
6
votes
0answers
66 views

παντοκράτωρ - a matter of power or authority?

παντοκράτωρ, pantokrator is generally translated as "almighty," interpreted as a matter of power. I.e. the bible talks about one infinite God, El shaddai. But im curious if we may have been ...
5
votes
1answer
338 views

Comparing 'ita' and 'sic'

Both ita and sic mean roughly "so" or "in such way". I know they are not identical and I have a relatively good feeling of their respective meanings, but I couldn't quite put my finger on the ...
4
votes
2answers
99 views

Was there any difference between “grātĭa” and “făvor”?

The Lewis & Short dictionary defines gratia as: grātĭa, ae, f. gratus; lit., favor, both that in which one stands with others and that which one shows to others. I. Favor which one finds ...
15
votes
2answers
6k views

Do *Mundi* and *Mundum* mean different things?

I came across this expression in the book: The Invisible Man, (H.G. Wells) Griffin contra mundum...with a vengeance From my very basic knowledge of Latin (I'm a Bio. student) I take it that contra ...
7
votes
2answers
306 views

Comparing quicumque, quilibet, quisquis, quivis

The pronouns quicumque, quilibet, quisquis and quivis have a somewhat similar meaning, roughly "anyone". What exactly are their differences? The dictionary entries I have seen do not provide a clear ...
10
votes
2answers
591 views

What is the difference between “novi” and “scio”?

Latin has at least two words that straightforwardly translate to English "know": novi (perf. of nosco) scio Plautus combines the two pleonastically: nec vos qui homines sitis novi nec scio Here'...
3
votes
1answer
45 views

What is the difference between “return” and “yield”?

In the Python programming language, "yield" and "return" are keywords with specific meanings. A function can either yield a result (sending that result back and then continuing to work), or return it ...
7
votes
1answer
229 views

Is there a difference between 'pluvia' and 'imber'?

It occurred to me yesterday that I know two Latin words for rain: pluvia and imber. However, I don't seem to know how these two words compare to each other, and the L&S entries offer little help. ...