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Questions tagged [word-choice]

For questions concerning how to choose the correct word from a selection of similar-looking alternatives

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Quidquid vs quæcumque

Both quidquid and quæcumque are ways of translating English whatever or all things that [sth.], but is there any difference in meaning in that specific context? I have a vague notion, not based in ...
Rafael's user avatar
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3 votes
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152 views

Do imperatives trigger reflexive pronouns in Latin?

In English, imperative verbs have "invisible subjects": syntactically, they act like there's an invisible pronoun in the subject position. This is why we see look closely at yourself instead of *look ...
Draconis's user avatar
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2 votes
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72 views

Differences between φρονεω and νοεω

What is the difference between the meaning of these two words? How is it different when I φρονεω vs when I νοεω? So far as I understand it, νοεω is from the νους or καρδια, and φρονεω is from the φρην....
Phillip's user avatar
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2 votes
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Adverbial numeral for the "teen"s

I noticed this numeral while reading Regulus, the Latin version of the Little Prince. In the scene that the businessman shows his sum of stars, he says: Cinq cent un millions six cent vingt-deux ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
152 views

General vs specific "mors" and "vita"

To my understanding, words like vita and mors can either refer to the general concepts of life and death ("life is precious", "remember death") or to specific people's lifespans or ...
Draconis's user avatar
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1 vote
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74 views

Is *musica* a *scientia* or an *ars*?

If I understand correctly, ars would correspond to nowaday's "technical sciences" whereas scientia would correspond to "theoretical sciences". Therefore, which word would best ...
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1 vote
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204 views

Why does "Oedipus Rex" most commonly have a Latin rather than Greek title?

Nearly 2500 years ago, Sophocles wrote the Greek play Oedipus the King. It was originally titled Oedipus Tyrannus in Greek. Yet today, it is almost universally known as Oedipus Rex. Why and when did ...
Ray Butterworth's user avatar
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How would I say something along the lines of "no kicks no glory", "no kickstart no glory"

The intention is to point out that there is no glory in starting your motorcycle with electricity. Starting up your engine by kicking your kickstart is the one true and pure way. I tried to figure it ...
Max Ohert's user avatar