Questions tagged [vocabulary]

This tag is for questions concerning the meaning and usage of individual words or a few words in conjunction with each other.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
5
votes
1answer
1k views

Do the toes have names in (classical) Latin?

Do the five toes have individual names in Latin? I prefer classical Latin, but other variants are welcome too. I learned the names of the fingers yesterday, but I doubt the exact same names are valid ...
5
votes
1answer
76 views

How to distinguish assistant and associate professors?

Latin has an obvious word for a professor: professor. But what would be good Latin translations for assistant and associate professors? I am looking for two adjectives to go with professor (or ...
5
votes
2answers
166 views

Niti and straining for a stool

The entry for niti in Lewis and Short includes meaning I.B.3: "to strain for a stool". One passage of such use is mentioned: Suet. Ves. 20: Statura fuit quadrata, compactis firmisque membris, ...
4
votes
3answers
182 views

What is on or off topic?

When defining the scope of a site like this one, we need to decide what is on topic and what is off topic. How can I discuss such things in Latin? It can be a pair of adjectives or some other ...
13
votes
2answers
321 views

Is there a Latin word for “respectively”?

I am looking at some English translations of Latin texts (direction which I think is important to highlight), and I'm not sure there is an equivalent word in Latin. Example 1: English: These ...
7
votes
4answers
1k views

What is “time” in “first time”?

Is there a (preferably classical) Latin word for "time"? I mean "time" in the sense it has in "The first time is easiest." or "I can't remember the last time I was here.", not in the most common ...
5
votes
0answers
77 views

Does Latin offer a single word referring back to the preceding *two* names mentioned?

Background. The following is correct standard English: (0) He read the poems of Catullus, Juvenal, Horace, and Virgil. He intentionally memorized only poems of the latter two. The following uses ...
7
votes
1answer
237 views

Is there a Ancient Greek or Latin equivalent to “steely eyed”?

I'm looking for parallel idioms related by vocabulary and/or meaning. This is in reference to a question on Mythology regarding the "gray eyed" translation of an epithet of Athena: Why is Athena “...
5
votes
1answer
55 views

About “joyful news”

I see there's a word for it: laetificum, laetificī. Then, if there's a Latin word for "joyful news," is there also a Latin word for "sad news"?
8
votes
1answer
971 views

What is equivalent of “persona non grata” for a company?

If I wanted to use an equivalent of persona non grata to describe a company with which I would not want to do business, what's the best translation of "company", i.e. in the financial/commercial sense?...
6
votes
2answers
461 views

How would one say “fading away” in Greek and Latin?

In music, the Italian term morendo means "fading or dying away". This fairly transparently comes from morior. But morior to me suggests the moment of death, rather than a gradual decline, and is also ...
9
votes
3answers
1k views

What is Latin (and Greek) for “medium”? (Greek)

The particular sense of medium I have in mind is the one used in Water is a medium of sound propagation. But propagation implies a multiplicity of places, or at least two of them, so that if ...
2
votes
0answers
61 views

Has linguistic agglutination played any provable role in Ancient Greek's conduciveness to complex philosophical ideas and concepts?

My last question received a comment from Joonas Ilmavirta that just made me think about a fantastical, if in any way true, possibility: I would add that Greek tends to favor compound words far more ...
6
votes
1answer
340 views

How to render “'Fun is Good' -Dr. Seuss” in Latin?

"is good" is fairly easy, some form of bŏnum with the verb of being, but I'm having more trouble with the word for "fun". Part I: "Fun" Lūdus was my first thought because it refers to play in the ...
8
votes
1answer
104 views

About Aristotelian ἐπιχαιρεκακία

In this passage from Nicomachean Ethics, Aristotle uses the word ἐπιχαιρεκακία to mean: joy over one's neighbour's misfortune My question is, Does ἐπιχαιρεκακία have a Latin counterpart in either ...
6
votes
2answers
154 views

About αὐτόματος

According to the wikipedia article on this word, it is composed of αὐτός and ματος, which seems to be derived from "the proto-Indo-European *méntis ~ *mn̥téys (“thought”)." My question is simple: Is ...
5
votes
2answers
202 views

Comparing words for resistance

The English word "resistance" is obviously etymologically related to resistentia, and I would like to understand how good of a translation resistentia. To be clear, I mean resistance in the sense of a ...
11
votes
5answers
2k views

A plausible technical term for 'boiler'

I'm looking for a word for 'boiler' as in the phrase 'the ship's boiler nearly burst', but I can't think of anything remotely suitable. Perhaps there is something obvious that I can't bring to mind? ...
4
votes
0answers
92 views

Is Pluto a planet(a)?

Judging by Lewis and Short (and other sources), planeta means a wandering star and was borrowed from Greek. Apparently the word is post-classical, and the classical expression is stellae errantes/...
7
votes
3answers
410 views

What to call a book review?

This earlier question asked about translating a sentence about book reviews. Translating the concept correctly was unimportant, since the question was about syntax and pronouns. In my answer I gave ...
2
votes
1answer
361 views

What to call an old people's service home?

When an elderly person is no longer capable of or willing to live on their own, they can choose to move something I would call a "service home"1. Such institutions offer a variety of services: ...
5
votes
3answers
431 views

Can aliquis function as an adjective?

Aliquis is typically a pronoun, but can it also function as an adjective like aliqui? For example, aliqui homo currit versus aliquis homo currit.
20
votes
3answers
2k views

What is the most common classical Latin word that we don't understand?

I assume that we do not know the meaning of every single word attested in classical and older Latin (literature, inscriptions, and other material). If this assumption is false, it makes this question ...
12
votes
2answers
2k views

Latin words for various types of diets (carnivore, vegetarian, vegan, etc.)?

Does Latin have words for the various types of diets, e.g., "vegetarian," "vegan," etc.? St. Thomas Aquinas, seemingly referring to what we today would call a "vegan," says (Summa Theologica II-II q. ...
6
votes
1answer
495 views

What does the -met ending mean in “vosmet” or “temet”

I don't understand where vosmet and temet came from. I know vos and te as pronouns, but what is the -met ending? Is that from some other language? Is it used anywhere else? It seems irregular. Why ...
8
votes
1answer
259 views

Why does 'a' change to 'i' in verbs derived from 'habere'?

The verbs derived from habere usually have an 'i' in the stem rather than an 'a'. For example, adhibere, exhibere, inhibere, and prohibere, leading to the modern English verbs adhibit, exhibit, ...
8
votes
1answer
1k views

What verb is wine made with?

Which verb did the Romans use for making wine? I can imagine saying vinum facio/conficio/primo and maybe some other options as well. Different verbs might emphasize different aspects or steps of ...
10
votes
3answers
306 views

What would the singular of a tribes-people like Caledonii be?

This map names a lot of tribes-people. The one in Scotland is called "Caledonii". I'm assuming "Caledonii" is the plural form of the people. I've also seen other maps where the land is called "...
8
votes
1answer
200 views

“User” in Greek in the English technical sense of the word

As I don't have an English Greek dictionary myself, I was wondering if anyone could tell me how I could translate the word "user" into Ancient Greek in its technical sense used on sites such as this ...
14
votes
1answer
837 views

Did Romans distinguish between black and blue?

Did the Romans distinguish between black and blue? Or, more generally, what do we know about their color system? I was wondering because many of the modern Roman languages use either Arabic or ...
8
votes
1answer
296 views

Putting a mobile phone in airplane mode

Having flown quite a bit over the last few months, the vocabulary is fresh in my mind — but only in English. How can I say "my mobile phone is in airplane mode" in Latin? There are a couple of ...
7
votes
1answer
93 views

“Ad populum” idiom

Is "ad populum" ever seen as an idiom for "popular", or can it only mean "to the people"? For example, if something is considered popular, would "ad populum" be an acceptable phrase to use?
11
votes
3answers
338 views

Can “alea” refer to a physical die, or only the game of dice?

(Inspired by this question.) The common English understanding of Caesar's famous "alea iacta est" is "the die is cast", using a metaphor from the throwing of a (physical) die. The ...
4
votes
1answer
594 views

How would one say “Unite/unify and conquer”?

We all know the principle of divide and conquer: divide et impera I was wondering (kind of as a joke) what would be the appropriate translation of "unite and conquer" or "unify and conquer" (...
5
votes
1answer
243 views

A verb for Googling in Latin

In English "Google" has become a verb meaning "to search using Google". In Finnish the name "Google" is not a valid verb, so it has been modified to "googlata" which is conjugated regularly. How ...
9
votes
1answer
275 views

Term for urban planning?

So while there is a plethora of words regarding features of urban planning in Latin, is there an actual term or phrase for the act of planning a city? "Urbs designans" and "inventio urbica" seem like ...
8
votes
2answers
726 views

What's the best translation of “vindice” in Met. 1.89?

I was translating this verse, and although I came up with several candidates for translating vindice, I am still not sure about the intended meaning. Aurea prima sata est aetas, quae vindice nullo, ...
5
votes
2answers
1k views

A word for income tax

I suddenly realized that I don't know how to translate the English word "tax" to Latin. What would be the best Latin word for "tax(es)" in the sense of income (salary) taxation in the modern world? I ...
5
votes
1answer
163 views

Do any common/barnyard Latin animal names start with vocalic I?

Like with this question, I'm looking for common or barnyard animals attested in the Classical period, but Late Latin or early Medieval Latin that has a good case of going back to the Classical period ...
11
votes
2answers
5k views

Are there any subtle differences in the greetings, “Ave” and “Salve”?

When greeting someone, are there any subtle differences between "Ave" and "Salve"? Can both be used to greet and respond? E.g. Marcus: Ave, Cicero. Cicero: Salve, Marce. Or, vice ...
10
votes
3answers
1k views

Do any Latin animal names start with Q?

Ideally I'm looking for common or barnyard animals attested in the Classical period, but Late Latin or early Medieval Latin that has a good case of going back to the Classical period would suffice. I ...
3
votes
1answer
331 views

Does “matrimonium” ever refer to a polygamous or homosexual relationship?

Matrimonium is the standard term in Roman legal parlance for "matrimony", along with the related term nuptiae, "wedding." My question is simply stated: In Roman classical antiquity, either by legal ...
6
votes
1answer
218 views

How can I combine apis and genu?

I'd like to combine the words "apis" and "genu" into an English word that means something like "pertaining to the bee's knees". My guess would be something like "apigenual", but I have no idea if ...
8
votes
2answers
568 views

English “Master” vs. “Mister” translated in Latin

I'm writing a novel in which Latin-speaking students at Oxford in 1560's are talking. In English, they'd be referring respectfully to gentlemen who weren't noblemen as "master," and noblemen as "lord....
2
votes
1answer
216 views

Is “mesnomer” the Latin equivalent of the English word “misnomer”?

At first, I thought "misnomer" was an English word adapted from Latin (still learning, as you can see). Yet, it seems it does not exist in Latin. According to Wikipedia: From Anglo-Norman mesnomer, ...
8
votes
1answer
4k views

What is “philosophy” in Latin?

The Latin word I would use for to translate "philosophy" is philosophia. But this is a transliteration of a Greek word. Is there an originally Latin word for "philosophy"? The closest word I could ...
8
votes
2answers
568 views

Attack From All Sides

Is there a term in Latin for an attack from all sides, similar to the English gauntlet? I need the translation to be as short-and-sweet as possible, as it's for a short title: The Gauntlet (that's it)....
6
votes
1answer
322 views

Is “vicepraesidens” valid for “vice president”?

This phrase appeared in Nuntii Latini last December: In causa erant discordiae inter praesidentem et vicepraesidentem ortae. Is vice- a good prefix in Latin, and does it really produce the same ...
7
votes
2answers
10k views

What's the most idiomatic way to say, “thanks, you too”?

We were discussing this question in the chat room, and came up with the possibility, gratias similiter, but we are not sure whether it's idiomatic. The context is this. Let's say a co-worker says to ...
8
votes
1answer
846 views

Was the term “firmamentum” used outside of Christian or Jewish texts?

In a common Jewish or Christian view of the world, the sky is a support for something. I don't recall much of anything about this, but I know that explains the English term firmament. However, did ...

1
7 8
9
10 11
14