Questions tagged [vocabulary]

This tag is for questions concerning the meaning and usage of individual words or a few words in conjunction with each other.

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3
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1answer
223 views

What is “site” in Latin?

I have been using the simple-minded translation situs (fourth declension) for "[web]site", and I have used it to refer to this site, among others. I'm not convinced this is a good choice, as I have no ...
6
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1answer
59 views

Translating 'multos labores subierunt'

I am trying to translate the following sentence: Diu in undis errabant et multos labores subierunt. I am able to translate the first part as: For a long time the ship was wandering in the waves ...
4
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1answer
109 views

Is this meaning of usury coming from Latin?

In this paper there is a quotation from an early 20th century document by an economist (italics in original): No bank should be allowed to charge any such percentage as 7% for its services. The ...
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2answers
108 views

With which verb can I borrow from other languages?

If I want to describe that the word philosophia was borrowed from Greek to Latin, which Latin verb can I use for borrowing? Verbs like commodare and mutuari sound a little weird for this kind of loan. ...
4
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1answer
293 views

Maple trees in Ancient Rome

I was reading about maple trees this afternoon, and I was delighted to find out that the genus name is "Acer", named after the Latin adjective meaning "sharp", because maple wood was firm, sharp, and ...
5
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1answer
81 views

When did “comment” stop meaning “lie”?

A commentum (from comminiscor) is, according to the Elementary Latin Dictionary: an invention, fabrication, pretence, fiction, falsehood At some point, a commentarium (and, I presume, its cognate ...
7
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2answers
472 views

Belonging in the sense of belonging somewhere

What is a Latin phrase to express the sense of belonging to a particular place? How can this be translated from English to Latin?
13
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6answers
560 views

“Mind the gap!”

I am currently in London, and the Underground has been kind enough to repeat this warning numerous times: Please mind the gap between the train and the platform! Having heard the same phrase over ...
8
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1answer
119 views

asustilbar (?): a strange word from the Tractatus de Herbis

There is a following illustration (f. 28r) in the Tractatus de Herbis: (Here is a link to an image with high resolution.) It is written in Wikipedia that "Apparently the artist has confused his ...
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0answers
115 views

What is the relation between -men and -mentum?

When answering this question about incrementum, I recalled the similarity of the suffixes -mentum and -men. If the linked Wiktionary pages are to be trusted, they are etymologically related, both ...
3
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1answer
60 views

How to say pattern recognizer/analyzer or describe someone who can differentiate patterns?

How to say pattern recognizer/analyzer or describe someone who can differentiate patterns? The closest thing that I could find was homo analyticus. Are there any better descriptors available? Homo ...
8
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1answer
403 views

What is the difference between ira and furor?

The words ira and furor are quite similar, but apparently not synonymous. I found myself unable to give a clear comparison of the two words. How would you describe the difference between the meanings ...
2
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1answer
88 views

What is whole grain?

How do you say "whole grain" in Latin? The expressions in Romance languages are fairly similar, and based on them I would guess granum integrum. For example, I might say panem grani integri edere malo....
8
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1answer
401 views

Can infans refer to children who can speak?

The word infans means basically "speechless", as the connection to the verb fari immediately suggests. One specific meaning of this word is a small child (III in the linked L&S entry). I assume ...
5
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1answer
148 views

How to say “lower bound” and “upper bound”?

Lower bound, upper bound, infimum, supremum, minimum, and maximum are concepts in mathematics. I cannot find translations of them in Wikipedia and Latin dictionaries. Here are their translations in ...
3
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1answer
61 views

How to say by/on the basis of?

In mathematics, the following phrase is common: By Theorem 5.6, the function is differentiable. How do I say 'by' in Latin? I don't think 'ab' is appropriate to use here. One way is to put '...
4
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3answers
80 views

Is there a Latin idiom for a set date for an event?

Suppose I have a meeting, a court hearing, or any event that is set by some authority at a specific time in the future. Is there a word for such a "due date"? I don't mean a deadline (see the separate ...
3
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0answers
43 views

Can we find a quotation from an author containing the word μεγαρτός?

I ran into this this morning, and had an exchange in comments with the other answerer (after answering myself). The word μεγαρτός, I'm fairly certain, means "envied", being the -τος verbal adjective ...
3
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1answer
366 views

Is there a Latin word for a deadline?

Is there a Latin word for "deadline", a predefined point in time before which some assignment must be complete? I have heard the literal translation linea letalis, but there are also words like ...
3
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2answers
179 views

How has the meaning of constitutio changed?

The latest Nuntii Latini mentions the Spanish constitution in relation to the Catalonian independence movement. It appears that in contemporary Latin a constitution is simply constitutio. Judging by ...
6
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1answer
542 views

How do you say “We stand upon the shoulders of giants” in Latin?

I would like to translate "We stand upon the shoulders of giants" to Latin. I don't know how to say "shoulders", "giants", and "upon", but I do not trust Google Translate.
5
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2answers
4k views

What’s the Latin word for “information”?

I'm creating a Latin quiz game and want to know the best word/noun for “information”. The word will be used as a title for an information/welcome page on my quiz. I searched the word on the internet ...
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0answers
50 views

Comparing citizens and subjects

There is a difference between a citizen and a subject. Roughly, a citizen holds some power in the state (through voting or otherwise), whereas a subject is subordinate to their leader and has no say. (...
5
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2answers
1k views

What does [ὀλίγου] ἐμαυτοῦ ἐπελαθόμην actually MEAN?

The first sentence of the Apology of Socrates is: Ὅτι μὲν ὑμεῖς, ὦ ἄνδρες Άθηναῖοι, πεπόνθατε ὑπὸ τῶν ἐμῶν κατηγόρων, οὐκ οἶδα· ἐγὼ δ' οὖν καὶ αὐτὸς ὑπ' αὐτῶν ὀλίγου ἐμαυτοῦ ἐπελαθόμην, οὕτω ...
3
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2answers
328 views

How to translate piazza?

I am looking for a Latin translation of the Italian word "piazza". Specifically, I would like to have a Latin word to describe the various piazze in today's Rome. I have found a couple of ...
3
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1answer
145 views

“ita” used for “adeō”

I'm reading Goffaux's 1823 Latin adaptation of Robinson Crusoe (it turns out there are FOUR nineteenth-century Latin adaptations of Robinson Crusoe!) and came across the sentence: Attamen propius ...
7
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1answer
478 views

Latin for “Teaching man”

How would you say "teaching man" in Latin, in the same way as "homo sapiens" (thinking man) or "homo economicus" (economic man)? It would be for an essay discussing modern education and the role of a ...
3
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1answer
217 views

Earliest Latin expressions for a honeymoon

The only Latin translation I found for "honeymoon" or "wedding trip" is iter nuptiale. It is a sensible translation, but I could only find very recent uses. (Google search results are personalized, so ...
5
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1answer
43 views

Meaning of “signo solito”

What is the meaning of signo solito? For example: The arrangements were explained to Jem by interpreters "skilled in Latin and in Turkish," and being satisfied, he confirmed the Hospitallers' plans ...
5
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1answer
80 views

Acknowledging Message, e.g. “Copy that” or “Roger”

In English there are certain phrases, like "copy that" or "roger" that are used to confirm that a message was received, especially in radio communication. What would be a good Latin term or phrase to ...
4
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1answer
98 views

Does Latin have an animal-based term for “coward,” like “scaredy-cat” in English?

In English, a lowbrow way to call someone a coward is to call him or her a "scaredy-cat" or "fraidy-cat." Apparently, somewhere along the way cats got a reputation for being easily frightened. ...
4
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3answers
356 views

Can “gēns” be used to exclude outsiders, as in English “Gentile”?

I'm examining a work by Tertullian, Adversus Iudaeos, and in it he uses the word "gentibus" in a way that seems to indicate peoples or nations: Hunc enim oportebat pro omnibus gentibus fieri ...
5
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1answer
70 views

Can “sequi” be used to indicate that I “follow” an argument?

I would like to know if sequor can be used to translate a sentence like the following: Do you follow my argument? The linked L&S entry does not have anything equivalent, though it does ...
14
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1answer
470 views

Bullying vocabulary

I am not familiar with any mentions of bullying in Roman literature, so I would like to ask for good words for the phenomenon in classical Latin. I would like something that is suitable for bullying ...
5
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1answer
495 views

Graciliscenda - Quid significat?

"Bene mane ante speculum in graciliscenda corpus exercitia incumbens susurrulum quendam excogitaverat." Found in Alexander Lenard's translation of 'Winnie the Pooh.' Probably a compound word, but my ...
5
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1answer
235 views

Emeo – possibly misspelled word

What does word emeo mean? As in: "Heri, ad tabernam eō. In tabernā sunt trēs rēs quārum amō duas sōleās et unam mensam. Habeō trēs denariōs, sīc ego emeō mensam sōlum quod sum nōn dīvīnitās" ...
3
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0answers
26 views

Are there meaningful differences in meaning and usability between 'calculare' and 'computare'?

Is there any meaningful difference, from the point of view of classical philology (not from the point of view of contemporary usages and dictionaries which more or less seem to consider them synonyms) ...
4
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1answer
328 views

Is there a word for a typo?

Yesterday in our chat it turned out that we didn't know a Latin word for a typo(graphical error). For example, I typed lingarum instead of linguarum. What would be a Latin word to describe a mistyped ...
5
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1answer
943 views

What does “tellus” mean?

What does the word tellus mean? In the research sites we see the word "Earth" as meaning, but there is an article that cites the Latin word as "sense of the way of man".
5
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1answer
393 views

What is an entrepreneur?

I am looking for a Latin word for "entrepreneur" or "self-employed" or something in that direction. My question is two-fold: Was there a word in classical Latin for someone who owns their own ...
9
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3answers
1k views

Are there Latin words for hair color?

English words like "brunette", "blonde", and "redhead" refer to people of a particular hair color. Are there similar words in Latin? It is easy to express hair color in English or Latin with several ...
3
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1answer
143 views

What is a digit?

Is there a good Latin word for a digit or figure? I might want to say that the sum of the digits of 43 is 7 or that an actor was paid a six-figure salary for a movie. It occurred to me that I don't ...
5
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1answer
362 views

Source and meaning of ἀεί ὁ ἄνθρωπος ἀριθμητίζει?

In the preface to the first edition of Essays on the Theory of Numbers, Dedekind writes: "In this sense which I wish to express by the word formed after a well-known saying ἀεί ὁ ἄνθρωπος ...
5
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2answers
1k views

How to say “Time The Devourer”

I already think I know how to say this but looking for a more definitive answer. Tempus Edax Rerum is my thought?
5
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1answer
1k views

Is there a good word for vacation?

It occurred to me that I don't know a good Latin word for a vacation. I don't mean a celebration, or any religious or other public event, but just a period of time I have decided to take off work. The ...
12
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2answers
496 views

Is there an exclusive word for octopus in Ancient Greek?

I was having the great "octopuses vs. octopi" debate with a scientist friend the other day, and decided to check the lexicon. The only entry I could find relates the word to measurement, either of ...
5
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2answers
184 views

What is a joke?

What is the best Latin word for a joke? By a joke I mean a short funny story, like one starting with two or three people entering a bar. It doesn't have to be a single word. I know some joke words (...
8
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2answers
153 views

Translating “understand” in a conversation

What is the best verb to be used in phrases like "I'm sorry, I didn't understand" or "Did you understand?" in Latin? In English one might use "understand" or "get", in Italian perhaps "capire" is the ...
7
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2answers
973 views

Are there any Roman/Latin equivalents of the English interjections um, huh, uh, etc.?

Listening in to any conversation, one will quickly realize that people don't always know what they are going to say when they start speaking. This causes them to say things like "ummm," "uhhh," or "...
8
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2answers
2k views

What is the correct Latin prefix for 'two-and-a-half-times'?

Question. What is the latin prefix for "2½ times" ? Remark. The question asks for the correct analogue of the prefix "sesqui-" which, of course, is the prefix for "1½ times".

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